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Six words about zombie games

(I've had some medical problems that have distracted from writing about games lately, but this should be of interest.)

According to tweetdeck, one of the trending:worldwide topics on twitter not so long ago was 6 word stories. In the past few months I've asked people to say 6 words about game design, programming, wargames, stories in games, casual games, and innovation (and plagiarism) in games.

This time the challenge is this: say six (interesting or amusing) words about zombie games.

Six words about innovation or plagiarism (or both) in games

Six words about innovation or plagiarism (or both) in games

According to tweetdeck, one of the trending:worldwide topics on twitter not so long ago was 6 word stories. In the past few months I've asked people to say 6 words about game design, programming, wargames, stories in games, and casual games.

This time the challenge is this: say six words about innovation or plagiarism (or both) in games.

Cooperative games

I recently listened to episode #16 of the “Ludology” podcast, about cooperative games. As usual the discussion between Ryan Sturm and Geoff Englestein was quite interesting. And it made me reflect again on a cooperative game I designed recently and played several times, but which I put aside because it doesn’t work suitably.

February Miscellany

Thoughts about some game-related topics that are not long enough for separate blog posts.

The Fundamental Differences between Board and Card Games and How Video Games Tend to Combine Both Functions

What are the fundamental functional differences between boardgames and card games? I’m not sure how important this question is from a game player’s point of view but it’s certainly important for game designers (even for video game designers). The obvious physical format is important, but now that we can convert physical non-electronic games to electronic formats the lines are less clear. More importantly, each type of game emphasizes or encourages different kinds of challenges and gameplay, regardless of the physical format.

Some distinctions between types of war-related games

One of the disadvantages of writing articles for magazines, such as “Against the Odds,” is that it can be literally years from the time it is submitted to the time it is published. I recently sent ATO an article about different kinds of war related games, and I’m going to briefly categorize its 4,000 words in 400.

I will not respond to any comments here, sooner or later the full article will be published.

Joe Angiolillo’s taxonomy of war related games:
● Games about war
● Wargames
● Simulations

Games about war
● no connection with reality
● symmetric

What do we mean by "elegance" in games?

When someone says a game is "elegant", what do they mean? I'm not sure, so I've done a bit of investigating.

Is it used much? In my Info Select database, which includes my own notes about game design and teaching, and material that I've scraped off the Internet about those same topics in the past seven years, there are 84 notes containing the word "elegant" and another 34 containing "elegance". Clearly the term is used a lot in conversations and writin

Six words about stories in games

According to a recent tweetdeck, one of the trending:worldwide topics on twitter was 6 word stories. In the past few months I've asked people to say 6 words about game design, programming, wargames, and casual games.

This time the charge is this: say six words about stories in games (or stories and games, if you prefer).

Depth versus Variety: a Fundamental Change in Game Playing in the Past 30-40 Years

Recently I was discussing via blog posts what depth is in games (http://gamasutra.com/blogs/LewisPulsipher/20111219/9125/What_is_Depth_in... and elsewhere), and then ran across a discussion of how role-playing games have changed since D&D was first published
(http://shirosrpg.blogspot.com/2011/12/i-weep-for-newbs.html#comment-form ). I’ve realized that there is a connection between the two, that what gamers are looking for in games has changed in a fundamental way in the past 30-40 years.

Game descriptions, rules, and mechanics: what are the differences and similarities?

Recently a student in a video game design curriculum posted a note on the IGDA Game Design SIG about an assignment. The assignment was to describe mechanics for a game and he said his instructor had told him he’d written rules instead, with the result being a poor grade. I generally emphasize to students that the rules for a tabletop game detail the mechanics of the game, so the question became “what is the difference between rules and mechanics.” And as I discussed this privately with the student I saw that part of the possible confusion was the difference between description and specification, between the general and the specific.

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by Dr. Radut