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favorite wargames?

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CIDIC
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Joined: 12/31/1969

just currious what are your favorate wargames? what do you guys play?

zaiga
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Joined: 12/31/1969
favorite wargames?

I'm not a wargamer. The closest thing to a wargame I've played is Axis & Allies, that was years ago, the old edition. I liked it back then, and had some fun playing it. There are interesting mechanics, but there were some balance issues, some of which, I believe, have been fixed in the new edition.

However, my main gripe was the turn structure. If you played a game with 5 players you had to wait for like half an hour before it was your turn again. That's something that I do not find acceptable these days. I think it would have been easy to fix by breaking up player's turns in smaller chunks, but alas, they didn't go that route in the new edition.

I also played Wallenstein once, but I think it's a bit too far fetched to call that a wargame, as combat is only a relatively minor aspect of the game, and it's pretty simple, though the cube tower is enormously cool.

johant
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Joined: 12/31/1969
favorite wargames?

i have played the new A&A a couple of times.
It takes too long to play it. It sucks with 5!!!
I think that its best suited for 2 players.

Tried A game of Thrones once, seems much better.

The main problem with wargames is that it takes to long to play them....

OrlandoPat
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Joined: 10/16/2008
I'm going old school on you...

Okay, this is really old-school, but there's a great war game called "CLS". CLS is short for "Column, Line, and Square", the (primary) military formations during the Napoleanic wars.

The game itself was (I believe) created back in the early 70s and is now in the public domain. You have to get your own miniatures to play, and it takes between 2 and 6 hours to play a full game, but it really is a lot of fun.

The coolest thing is the simultaneous action. At the start of each "turn", everyone writes their orders. Once all orders are written, you start moving the figs according to the orders written. There are rules (of course) to help you resolve how the units interact when they come within gunshot or melee range of each other.

That's probably my favorite wargame, and it inspired the simultaneous movement that occurs in Ice Lake.

However, if you're not going to play that, go pick up Richard Borg's Memoir '44. It's a lot of fun and gives you a good feel for the history involved as well.

We actually looked at publishing a wargame last year. A local gamer had devised a system that was very simple and elegant. Sadly, he wanted 50% of the retail cost. Ah well.

- Pat Matthews
Live Oak Games
www.liveoakgames.com

ACG
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Joined: 12/31/1969
Re: I'm going old school on you...

OrlandoPat wrote:

The coolest thing is the simultaneous action. At the start of each "turn", everyone writes their orders. Once all orders are written, you start moving the figs according to the orders written. There are rules (of course) to help you resolve how the units interact when they come within gunshot or melee range of each other.

That's probably my favorite wargame, and it inspired the simultaneous movement that occurs in Ice Lake.

My war game also has simultaneous actions, though it's probably a little simpler. In the full-blown game, people have 15 seconds to commit to two actions to be performed in sequential order (write them down). If you can't think of two actions, too bad: you only get however many you could write down. They are then performed in alternating order for players A and B, A1B1A2B2 or B1A1B2A2 -- flip a coin to determine who goes first in case the order matters.

I had originally toyed with one action per round instead of two, but I found that often made things too simple. I may add it back in as a variant. But I think the simultaneous actions are one of the most unusual facets of the game.

ACG

OrlandoPat
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Joined: 10/16/2008
Number of Orders is an interesting design point

How many orders you can write is an interesting design point. If you give players too many it can really bog them down and send them into Analysis Paralysis. If you give them too few, it feels like you're just taking turns.

In CLS, certain armies get more "commands" than others. It's typically between 1 and 4. In Ice Lake, I let players write as many "orders" as they like - but they have to follow all of them. That's a great solution, but it only works on something light and limited.

Two seems like a good number, depending on the complexity of the actions allowed, and whether you allow opportunistic fire.

It's no fun, for example, to write "change to column" and "advance", if you aren't allowed to actually attack once you get where you're going.

What genre is your war game?

ACG
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Joined: 12/31/1969
favorite wargames?

Nothing really fancy -- just tokens representing guys with guns. You've got a bunch of soldiers which are basically little tokens with arrows on them, the arrow indicating the direction the soldier is facing. An action can be move without rotating the arrow, aim (rotate the arrow), or shoot. There is no opportunitistic fire -- well there is in the sense that if a unit finds himself with an enemy unit right next door at the end of a round, he can try to shoot him during the next round if the enemy doesn't move away or shoot him first!

Soldiers look in the direction their gun is pointed. If they can see an enemy who is shooting at them, they have a 50% chance of dodging the bullet. However, if they aren't, they're automatically hit and eliminated. First player to eliminate all the enemy soldiers wins.

In a more advanced version of the game, there are 10 different types of soldiers: the basic soldier from the basic game plus 9 other classes of soldiers (each of which has an advantage and a disadvantage: for instance: X can shoot twice as far but can't move as fast, Y dodges 75% of the time but has only range 1 instead of 2, Z can shoot over walls but can be inaccurate, etc.). The type of soldier is only revealed if the soldier performs an action restricted to a certain type or types (so if the guy shoots over a wall the player is forced to turn the tile over and show the opponent the type of soldier). One of the more controversial types (and one I may remove) is the so-called "suicide bomber" (I need to think of a better name!) -- acts like a normal soldier but can sacrifice himself to destroy all units in the square he is facing.

I haven't tried test playing it yet, but it seems fun playing at home against myself.

Incidentally, when you have multiple orders around in my game, everything gets executed to the best of the unit's ability -- you can't countermand them. If something gets in the way (the unit gets shot, a guy builds a wall in between, etc.) the action either doesn't occur or doesn't have the outcome you'd expect. There's a case where a prospective target can move before the shot takes place and the shot winds up knocking out a friendly unit behind the target -- friendly fire is a definite problem in this game.

ACG

larienna
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Joined: 07/28/2008
favorite wargames?

My favorite war games is "bells of war".

The scale of the map make the strategic manuver interesting. The basic rules are not too much complex.

The disadvantage is that first, it takes time. Second, since it is a WW2 simulation, it is always the same story with the same map. So there is a lower replay value.

Kreitler
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Joined: 12/31/1969
Re: I'm going old school on you...

OrlandoPat wrote:
The coolest thing is the simultaneous action. At the start of each "turn", everyone writes their orders. Once all orders are written, you start moving the figs according to the orders written. There are rules (of course) to help you resolve how the units interact when they come within gunshot or melee range of each other.

Task Force Games' Star Fleet Battles has a similar system (at least, it did way back in the 80's when I played it regularly). Sadly, I'm such a horrible tactician that pre-plotted turns with simultaneous movement pretty much spelled defeat for me on a regular basis. Nevertheless, I loved the game.

I don't know if it qualifies as a war game, exactly. It's certainly some sort of "naval fleet sim", at least. :)

Mark

koshianok
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Joined: 01/28/2009
favorite wargames?

I’m don't think it counts as a true wargame, However, I used to really enjoy playing Battletech. Constructing giant mechs and then battling them was very cool. I also really liked playing Warzone. A very streamlined, fast moving system skirmish level combat.

Xaqery
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Joined: 07/26/2008
favorite wargames?

Back in the day I used to play lots of War games. Panzer by Yaquito was the one we played the most. I liked it alot.

Rick-Holzgrafe
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Joined: 07/22/2008
favorite wargames?

I'm not a fan of "true" wargames. But I enjoy some of the more "euro-like" games. My favorite is A Game of Thrones; I also play Memoir '44, Wallenstein, and Twilight Imperium 3. With the exception of Memoir '44, which focuses on tactics on single battlefields, these games include elements such as economy, supply and resource management, and politics. In Wallenstein and TI3, these non-tactical elements outweigh the tactical. For example in TI3 it's possible (though unusual) to play and win without ever fighting a battle, garnering points instead by climbing the tech tree, managing trade, and annexing uncontested planets.

A Game of Thrones includes heavy amounts of tactical battle along with the other elements. Battles and tactics are greatly abstracted, and (I suspect) wouldn't satisfy the cravings of the bazillions-of-infantry-chits crowd. But one featur of AGOT that I really like is the simultaneous placement of orders. All players give orders to their armies simultaneously, by placing face-down order tokens next to each army. When all have been placed, all the order tokens are turned face-up; only then can you see what orders others have placed. After that, the orders are executed serially in a sequence that I won't bother to detail here. It's a very tense game!

dete
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Joined: 12/31/1969
favorite wargames?

would you consider RISK?

several buddies back from highschool still play it so we play it
when I'm down there.

Man, even though we are in our late 20s to early 30s we
play like freakin immature kids, taking it so personally.
many fights have broken out. thankgoodness only verbal.

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