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Stolen Idea

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Willi_B
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Joined: 12/31/1969
Stolen Idea

I agree with you Mr. Ellis... unfortunately the court has a hard time with intellectual property rights. I guess that's what drives up the lawyer fees.

So allow me to clarify to say this:

Most typical board games aren't going to earn you enough to bother with a patent.

I would still do it for that BIG game or a reusable game idea that you plan to exploit. Maybe it's a personal choice when it comes to this.

And there is no problem with getting a patent later... I don't think Garfield pursued his until many years after.

Chad_Ellis
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Joined: 12/31/1969
Stolen Idea

Willi_B wrote:
And there is no problem with getting a patent later... I don't think Garfield pursued his until many years after.

I'm no expert but my impression was that you had one year from public release of the game.

Willi_B
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Joined: 12/31/1969
Stolen Idea

me either, obviously.... he must have put in soone and only like 6 years later got it to go through.

RookieDesign
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Joined: 12/31/1969
Stolen Idea

Chad_Ellis wrote:
Maybe, maybe not. Patenting isn't cheap and it isn't guaranteed to work, either. We looked into patenting some of the mechanics of Battleground and ultimately decided not to, in part because the cost was large and in part because we were only confident of success for a fairly narrow patent that would not have prevented someone from making a competitive product.

In these days, instead of trying to protect my ideas to the death, I would try to spin them of. Try thinking about Open Licence.

Chad, you could have people freely develop armies from your Battlegroung using the same scale and rules, but when they could do so, they have to refer to you. That will boost out your presence on the market and increase your sales.

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