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Card game variations

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Anonymous

Wow, just stumbled on this site yesterday... what a tremendous resource!!!

Like everyone else I have been playing games my entire life, but have only recently become interested in creating / modifying my own. However, before I jump in over my head I had a few questions:

If I were to create and attempt to sell a variant (minor rule set changes and adding a board to facilitate play) of a somewhat obscure card game played almost exclusively in Asia, what would be the potential legal pitfalls that I would need to avoid? Are there any US or International laws that I need to be privy to?

To the best of my knowledge it has never been sold as a commercial card game, but is there a way to know for certain?

Thx in advance,
Damon

zaiga
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Joined: 12/31/1969
Re: Card game variations

Damon wrote:
To the best of my knowledge it has never been sold as a commercial card game, but is there a way to know for certain?

There are a lot of commercial card games released these days that are derived from traditional card games. "The Great Dalmuti", "Big Top" and "Anathema" spring to mind and many Rummy variants as well. So, I think that if you are going to publish a commercial variant of a traditional card game you won't get in any trouble, not even when that traditional card game has been already released in commercial form by someone else.

Of course, you should ask yourself what your commercial release of a traditional game would add to the gaming world. Why would someone buy your game, if he/she can play it with a standard deck of cards?

Oh, and welcome to the forum!

- René Wiersma

Joe_Huber
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Joined: 12/31/1969
Re: Card game variations

Damon wrote:
If I were to create and attempt to sell a variant (minor rule set changes and adding a board to facilitate play) of a somewhat obscure card game played almost exclusively in Asia, what would be the potential legal pitfalls that I would need to avoid? Are there any US or International laws that I need to be privy to?

You mean such as Gang of Four?

As a practical matter, I've as Rene notes it's been done many times; I'm not aware of any legal wrangling that has resulted from such.

If I were thinking of doing something of this nature, I'd probably contact Ray Mulford (who designed Big Top and Anathema) and ask about his experiences.

Joe

Anonymous
Card game variations

Thanks for the advice... its exactly what I wanted to hear.

Quote:
Of course, you should ask yourself what your commercial release of a traditional game would add to the gaming world. Why would someone buy your game, if he/she can play it with a standard deck of cards?

That is a great question. I really think that the traditional game's overly complex rule set has kept it from achieving much popularity. Hopefully, with a modified rule set and a board to help facilitate, it will become a more easily playable game.

Quote:
You mean such as Gang of Four?

This game also originates from China, but has not shared the same level of popularity as Gang of Four.

Ill post some info on it once I am further along.

Thanks again,
Damon

Oracle
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Joined: 06/22/2010
Card game variations

Damon wrote:
Quote:
You mean such as Gang of Four?

This game also originates from China, but has not shared the same level of popularity as Gang of Four.

Is it "guess the card game that's popular in Asia" time? :) . How about Big 2?

Jason

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