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Newbie Game Designer Needs Help With Creating Cards.

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Anonymous

Greetings,

I am trying to make a collectible card game, but the problem is I have no idea how to construct the cards myself. I want to make them at home for prototyping. What is the way everyone does this? I want them to be the standard 3 1/2 x 2 1/2 and I'd like them to be plyable as playing cards/magic cards. Any suggestions would be most helpful.

Thanks,

Drimitz

Anonymous
Newbie Game Designer Needs Help With Creating Cards.

Hey Drimitz, you replied to my epic game forum, perhaps your interested in doing a partnership and developing our two games together?

Regarding cards, I used to make a few card games a couple of years ago to play with my brothers and stuff. The only way I did it was to go into Paint or some other drawing program, draw up some cards to fit your measurements (hard I know but I just randomly drew mine until they seemd to work) you can then write in the text and stuff that will on the card, print them off, draw in or paste in or whatever any graphics you want, scan them into your computer and mass produce them.

This is they only way I know how to make cards at home, I hope it helps :D

Cheers,

Tim

NuYawkDawg
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Joined: 08/22/2009
creating cards

howdy and welcome. check the downloads on this site for a great set of card templates. you can print out your cards on cardstock and cut them yourself with a rotary cutter, or wait a bit and order the perferated card blanks, also from this site.

as for the finish you are looking for, i do not think you can get that by doing it at home. maybe using coated cardstock, but with a laser printer the toner flakes slightly and the front of the card discolors the back of the card it is next to in the deck. don't know how an inkjet works with that, don't have one.

hope this helps

Nu Yawk Dawg

Anonymous
Templates.

I have downloaded the templates from here and have made text versions of my cards. I am in the process of getting a good graphics program. Think I am going to go with Paintshop Pro 8. The problem that bothers me is my cards are not shuffable and they don't slide. I have went to the process of printing the front and back of my cards on standard printer paper then putting a core of 110lb card stock in the center. While this is plyable it does not slide. That is the problem in more detail. I use an ink jet printer too.

Thanks for the replies so far.

Drimitz

NuYawkDawg
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Joined: 08/22/2009
Newbie Game Designer Needs Help With Creating Cards.

i think that the extra thickness of the paper on both sides of 110# cardstock is the problem. add to that the thickness of the adhesive and the whole paper/cardstock/paper sandwich is too thick to shuffle. try printing straight to the cardstock, or use a thinner type.

the alternative is to print on plain paper and insert into card protecters. they shuffle fine and you do not have to go through the trouble of cutting cardstock each time you want to make changes.

Anonymous
card stock?

By card stock you mean the 110# right? So should I use a layer of 110# for the front and another for the back? or just use the 110# one sheet for front and back?

NuYawkDawg
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Joined: 08/22/2009
Newbie Game Designer Needs Help With Creating Cards.

no, two layers of cardstock is too much. EITHER print to a lighter weight cardstock OR print to plain paper and use the card protecters. for the prototyping, fast and easy will give you the least headaches.

Anonymous
Thanks.

Thanks for the advice.

daem0n_faust
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Joined: 12/31/1969
Newbie Game Designer Needs Help With Creating Cards.

I think you could paste two sides of your card (front and back)to an index card--thin index card! You could apply very thin glue using brush and dilute the glue in water. Or you could always try to print it on the index card directly. I once made a simple card game by HAND DRAWING the necessary details in 2.5 x 4 in. index cards. Yes it is tedious. For CCG, you could make do with mr. glue.

I also have an idea for a CCG, a political something. But the thing is, how do I get comparisons? I've played V:TES, but my concept is dissimilar. It has more to do with directly running your own government and its departments, trying to accumulate Reputation Points. But, anyway, this isn't my thread.

Anonymous
Newbie Game Designer Needs Help With Creating Cards.

I've been doing more card games lately than boardgames. I bought a ream of cardstock from Kinko's, and I run it through my HP Deskjet printer with no problem. I use 80 lb cover sheet type of card stock (at least, that's what it says on the label), and it works quite well in terms of shuffling and stiffness. I have found it to be a very good compromise between more expensive options and the tedium of trying to use card sleeves. (I tried card sleeves for paper printouts but was unsatisfied. With a Magic card for stiffness, the sleeved cards felt hard to shuffle, but without the card they were too floppy and impossible to shuffle. And then there's the problem of having to swap cards in and out anytime you update the base card set ...)

Before joining this site, I had built my own little template in MS Word. I simply used a table in Word and divided the columns and rows evenly. I found I like a 3 row by 4 column grid the best. In Word, I can import graphics, create text boxes to control my layout, etc. In addition, I can use the exact same template to make fancy card backs -- just run the pages back through the printer.

I hope this helps.

Captain Sky

Anonymous
Newbie Game Designer Needs Help With Creating Cards.

I've been doing more card games lately than boardgames. I bought a ream of cardstock from Kinko's, and I run it through my HP Deskjet printer with no problem. I use 80 lb cover sheet type of card stock (at least, that's what it says on the label), and it works quite well in terms of shuffling and stiffness. I have found it to be a very good compromise between more expensive options and the tedium of trying to use card sleeves. (I tried card sleeves for paper printouts but was unsatisfied. With a Magic card for stiffness, the sleeved cards felt hard to shuffle, but without the card they were too floppy and impossible to shuffle. And then there's the problem of having to swap cards in and out anytime you update the base card set ...)

Before joining this site, I had built my own little template in MS Word. I simply used a table in Word and divided the columns and rows evenly. I found I like a 3 row by 4 column grid the best. In Word, I can import graphics, create text boxes to control my layout, etc. In addition, I can use the exact same template to make fancy card backs -- just run the pages back through the printer.

I hope this helps.

Captain Sky

Aerjen
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Joined: 08/28/2008
Re: Templates.

drimitz wrote:
While this is plyable it does not slide. That is the problem in more detail. I use an ink jet printer too.

Thanks for the replies so far.

Drimitz

If you're just making a prototype and are using the templates from the forum you could stick the cards in card sleeves like they use with Magic e.g. They're called DeckProtectors if I remember correctly.

Captain_Sky wrote:
I tried card sleeves for paper printouts but was unsatisfied. With a Magic card for stiffness, the sleeved cards felt hard to shuffle, but without the card they were too floppy and impossible to shuffle

Have you tried both the soft and stiff sleeves? It makes quite a big difference in shuffling.

NuYawkDawg
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Joined: 08/22/2009
Newbie Game Designer Needs Help With Creating Cards.

i like the use of tables. i use word alot and it just never occured to me to try that. my only problem with that is not getting a poker-sized card. using the 3x3 template lets me have 2.5 x 3.5 cards that fit in card protectors, or just feel right in my hand.

with the 3x4 it looks like 3.5 x 2, more like the cards for a boardgame than a cardgame. and since i am working on both, i'm taking the idea and running. thanks

also in looking around at word i find the autoshapes provide a rounded rectangle. with a little tweaking you can get the corners to fit into the 6x2 template. (no laughing, this was a revelation for me). now to working a word version of that perf template.

game on
Nu Yawk Dawg

phpbbadmin
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Joined: 04/23/2013
hmmm

Deck Protectors (stiff type) + Perfed Card Sheets = Nearly perfect solution for prototyping poker sized cards... *Drools*.

-Darke

sedjtroll
sedjtroll's picture
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Joined: 07/21/2008
Newbie Game Designer Needs Help With Creating Cards.

As he has mentioned before, FastLearner's method of printing to paper (maybe heavy paper) then laminating with Xyron cold laminator makes for very good quality playtest cards.

- Seth

Anonymous
Card game cards

If you're just putting these together for play-testing, don't bother with laminating cards, pasting fronts to backs etc. You'll be spending WAAYYYY too much time just assembling your cards and not actually play-testing your game.

We (my partners and I) simply printed them out onto a 60 or 80 lb. smooth stock and sleeved them into typical deck protectors. Since you will be changing card values, cards, card text, etc. as you play-test, you'll want to be able to switch up a card easily and get back to playing. We even used the different colored Deck Protectors to help us identify each successive test deck. We probably made at least 8 full versions with variations, and our game was a stand alone 120 card game with simple rules - not a CCG which I would imagine could be much more complex.

To set up the files, I use Adobe Illustrator and put 9 cards to an 8.5" x 11" page. The cards butt up against each, and when I cut them out, I simply cut off the excess and make 4 cuts with an exacto. We don't even bother to round the corners (too time consuming).

If you don't have Illustrator, and you want a powerful graphics program, use Photoshop - it does everything, but Illustrator works best for quick card set-ups.

Keep in mind that the idea of a test deck is to get playable cards as fast as possible so you can work out the kinks in your game. Our play test cards had no graphics on them - just text. We used a simple colored background to help visually identify different card types. I even made sure to print them at a very low resolution from my printer to save time and ink.

If you want pretty play-test cards, you'll be spending a lot of time only to find that you'll need to change something later on.

Just so you know, for the finished art mechanical files (final production for print) we scanned all of the black and white art, rendered them in Photoshop, and created the mechanical files in Illustrator.

Hope this helps.

Chris

Anonymous
Newbie Game Designer Needs Help With Creating Cards.

I usually print direct to 110# cardstock. Then i spray this glossy acrylic coating that Krylon makes (look at your local Joann fabrics) for paper and photography. This coating adds a little snap to the cards and lets them slide against each other for shuffling and dealing. Dries in like two minutes. Best when you're running a complete set, instead of modifying a card or two, as the coating can be a bit inconsistant unless you do a bunch at the same time.

-Paul

Anonymous
Newbie Game Designer Needs Help With Creating Cards.

I used to playtest with 110# card stock (non laminated), then I tried laminated 110# stock. The laminated cards shuffle exactly like real playing cards, but doing changes can be very hard.

I have since learned to love prototyping with card sleeves. They shuffle incredibly well when you shuffle cards sideways (side to side instead of end to end). I don't even bother with cardstock for playtesting, I just print out the cards on paper and cut out.

If you're trying to make a finished version to give out or whatever, skip the 110# cardstock core, use a little heavier paper (a good 24# paper) and glue the two halves together back to back. Then laminate (a lot of people will swear by a Xyron type laminator) and cut. That has worked VERY well for me in the past.

Hope this helps.

Anonymous
I did it my waaaayyyy!

For the last few years I have made my cards the same way, I like the way they feel and the way they play. I do my graphic work on the computer using word and a template much like the one offered on this site. I am a member of clip-art.com where hundreds of thousands of clip art are available. I sometimes draw out the graphic and scan it onto the computer. Anyway once I have my artwork and text finished I print them out on printer paper. Next I spray the back of the uncut card sheet with Super 77 Adhesive spray from 3M and immediately place my cards (explained in a moment) onto the back of the card sheet. I let it dry overnight and than use an xacto knife to cut out the cards.

Now, 'the cards' are from the game Pictionary. I have thousands of them and they work perfectly. They are of a great size and have a generic Back that can be used for any game. I obtained the thousands that I have from hunting in the various thrift stores around town. There seems to be a virtual plethora of Pictionary games in the stores selling from .99 cents to 2 bucks. Plus hunting in the thrift stores (second hand stores) you find great components, boards, and yes even ideas for your next big time game. I have used woden cigar boxes to store game components, I have used old wooden picture frames for an outstanding rustic game I designed. I have lots of little do dads that are in a box just screaming for me to develope something they can be used in. LOL OK, enough of touting the thrift store hunting spree! As I said I have used this method for quite a few years and my dozen or so games that use cards have been done like this. I have done a 120 card set in one sitting, ok it took about 5 hours but hey it was one sitting. Who said us game designers are even the least bit sane when an idea hits us square in the Cranium.

Komi

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