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Team games

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Anonymous

Hi there, folks. I just discovered this site and thought I

doho123
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Team games

I

Challengers
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Team games

This is an intriguing topic. I immediately thought of Alpha Centauri (PC game) with its factions, meeting a party mystery. If you had a murder mystery, for example, the "factions" would be the detectives, the suspects and the by-standers. Each faction has a code of honor that would dictate their actions (if people played their roles in the proper spirit.) The suspects and detectives have obvious motives, but if you could come up with something interesting for the by-standers to accomplish, you

Anonymous
Team games

I have yet to play a team game despite owning an unplayed copy of Scotland Yard, but I was interested in your post. What

Anonymous
Team games

A couple more team ideas:

1. How about uneven groups? In a six player game, for example, how about a team of 4 and a team of 2. Say, a team of 4 dwarven miners trying to recover 1 ton of gold from a cave gaurded by two cave trolls, as an example.

2. How about creating sub-groups that recombine to achieve different sub-goals? Achieving goals rewards VPs. And/or each sub-group can shoot for different sub-goals or the same. For example, Doug and Mack race Alice and Carla to achieve goal #1. Then Mack and Alice race Doug and Carla to achieve goal #2. Or, instead... Doug and Mack work on goal #1 while Alice and Carla work on goal #2. Doug and Mack achieve goal #1, then begin on goal #3 while Alice and Carla are still on goal #2.

Scurra
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Team games

I

Anonymous
Team games

Not all group think team games are bad - you should check out "Are you a Werewolf" from Cheapass games. It ranks as one of the best games I

phpbbadmin
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Team games

Regarding Knizia

Anonymous
Team games

i know that Mutant Chronicles the board game is cooperative and so is Hero Quest. I know that these games are RPGs but I wanted to give you some more examples of team games. I for one like the Lord of the Rings Board Game. I would deffinately like to see more cooperative games, as long as they are done right.

Brykovian
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Team games

As an interesting twist on individual/cooperative gaming choices needing to be made by players in a game, I

Dralius
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Team games

Brykovian
An excellent table top territory game with all the features you mentioned already exists, "Diplomacy". It

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Quote:
26-02-2003 at 08:39, Dralius wrote:
Brykovian
An excellent table top territory game with all the features you mentioned already exists, "Diplomacy".

I

Dralius
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Team games

Two or more players can decide to join up for the win. This helps shorten the game when it

Brykovian
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Quote:
27-02-2003 at 10:28, Dralius wrote:

So what Ideas do you have that would make your conquest game unique.

Well, there are a couple of mechanical/concept things that will make one of my pending games ("Shades of Control" is the working title) unique, but I

Anonymous
Team games

In one cooperative game I did, there was a board with pieces that were idenfied by team, but not associated with any one player. There were a set of cards that transformed the state of the board, possibly scoreing points for the moving piece

Anonymous
Team games

Rauros - both ideas sound very interesting ...

dete
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Team games

the best team player game I've played
is actually a simple card game.

The people who taught me how to play it called it Kemp.
tis for 4 players or perhaps 6.

everybody has a partner that sits across from them.
Object is to collect 4 of a kind. 4 kings, 4 eights, etc.
Once you have 4 of a kind, you have to let your partner know
without anyone else knowing.
Because your partner has to say Kemp for your team to win.
If the other team suspects they can make you loose.

So anyway following this model, the game play is so
that each person is busy doing their OWN thing.

You can't talk cause the other players are listening
and watching.

your team will do better if you can read each other
and cooperate. Ultimately you NEED to cooperate to win.

I believe that is the core to a good team game.

Anonymous
Team games

Mille Bornes is actually designed for two teams of two players each, and I think it plays the most fun in that fashion.

The original 'themed' concept is a driver and a passenger in a car.

Kreitler
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Re: Team games

rshipp wrote:

Each player must make their own decisions. Groupthink and tabletalk should not dominate the play of the game.

Each player should, ideally, have a way to contribute to the players´ overall success. using theLOTR model, each player could, for instance, have a special ability, or hold their own set of cards from which they can play to influence the groups´ position.

Players in a cooperative game should be able to work as a team toward a common goal, not just as a set of individuals. This could mean some way of helping a comrade out in a crucial battle, or a way of revealing, in some controlled fashion, some secret information that you´ve learned that can help another player. A simple example of this that comes to mind is the card swapping that goes on between partners in some trick-taking games. Note that I´m talking about ways of helping people out that don´t include just looking at everyone´s hand and pointing out to them on the board what you think their "best" move is.

And finally, all of this led to me thinking about cooperative/competitive games, a.k.a. team games.

Any ideas on where to start? Sports themes seem obvious, but I´m afraid I can´t think how to make them work well. The only other one that has popped into my head is a competition on a factory floor between two assembly lines or something.

Hey Randy,

Cool thoughts. I agree about LoTR...I found it pretty unsatisfying (I think we're in the vast minority, though).

About a year ago, I started working on a fully co-op card game that implements a lot of the features you mention. I've playtested it a few times since then, and it seem to work well.

Here's the basic design and what I learned:

Theme: tongue-in-cheek horror. Each player takes a character card (Ash, Buffy, Celina, Mac, Ben, or Shaun -- all main characters from relatively cheesy horror flicks). These characters are all "camping" when the dead come back to life. They make their last stand in an abandoned cabin, trying to survive until morning. This certainly gives everyone a reason to cooperate!

Gameplay: you play against a 6 minute timer. The first 1/2 of the game is "daytime", the second half "night". Basic gameplay is: on your turn, draw 1 zombie (if day) or 2 (if night) and add it to your "zombie group", then play as many normal cards as you have health points (max 3). Your short term goal is to kill, stun, or dodge zombies to avoid damage. The long term (team) goal is to kill all zombies before morning. Normal cards come in several flavors -- attack, defense, heal, and special. Each character has a special ability that makes him or her more effective with some of the cards. On your turn, you can draw normal cards from any of 3 piles. You draw 1 card at a time. If you don't like it, you can discard it and draw again. If you like it, you play it right away. You can draw as many times as you like until you've played all your cards or decided that you'r done. There are some nuances to these rules, but that's basically it. Any zombies in your group that aren't killed or stunned at the start of the next turn will attack you and do 1 damage apiece.

Here's how these mechanics address your points from above:

Each player must make their own decisions. Groupthink and tabletalk should not dominate the play of the game.
Since you're playing against a timer, tabletalk stays limited: "Don't use the shotgun -- I need it!", and "Oh--use the med kit and heal me!" are about the extent of the planning. Also, since you don't hold a hand, it's impossible to do extended planning (i.e., no "well, I have two moves, but we might need those, so let's use Rob's combat card instead"). However, you will see players avoiding a draw from a pile with a card that fits another player's special ability.

Each player should, ideally, have a way to contribute to the players´ overall success.
Every player can kill zombies -- though some are a bit better at it under certain conditions.

Players in a cooperative game should be able to work as a team toward a common goal, not just as a set of individuals.
There are several ways to help others in the game: ranged weapons like rifles and shotguns allow you to attack zombies in other players' groups; the 'Shaun' character can use defense cards to protect other characters (other characters can protect only themselves); players cannot use "heal" cards on themselves.

Since zombies attack first in a round, it becomes vitally important for players to protect each other, as it's sometimes impossible to incapacitate all zombies in your Group during your turn. I've seen many games end badly when one person kept forgetting to attack a zombie in the group belonging to the next player.

This type of team play is critical to success in this game. In one playtest session, 3 of the 4 players acted as a team, but the last guy had to be the hero, and every time his turn came up, he burned through cards trying to get the best attacks possible. That group never came close to winning...

I hope this helps somehow. I realize this isn't exactly the kind of game you had in mind (killing zombies is a long way from a sports game), but it has a lot of the elements you suggested above.

I hope you post the results of your research when it starts to come together.

Cheers,

K.

Infernal
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Team games

A simple winner condition that would encourage team play but limit table talk is:
The winner is the player who has the higest player score in the team with the highest team score. NB: player score and team score may be two different scores, or may be the summ of all scores for that team.

This may encourage occasional backstabbing in the leading team (but that would harm the victory chances for that team).

doho123
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Team games

I've pretty much found LotR to always devolve into "1 player and 3 others to hold cards". Which has led me to (similarly) believe that there needs to be something else other than just "everyone strives for one goal." There IS some alternate rule for LotR that allows for some individual score based on "things not used" if the player's win, but seems to be against the spirit.

One approach might be like this upcoming game:Shadows over Camelot.
Where everyone is cooperating for a common goal, BUT one player MIGHT be a traitor waiting for the right time to screw over the entire eterprise.

And then there is always:
Betrayal at the house on the Hill Where players are sort of working together until something bad happens.

Another approach that I've got some slight handle on would be something "Survivor-esque," where are working together to, well survive (be it a deserted island, a "lost" island, a dungeon, spaceship, haunted house, whatever), by playing cards to finish goals out of their hand. However, at certain points in the game, all hands are revealed, and the player with the worst hand left is killed, booted, kicked, removed from the game. So, while it is in your interest to "keep the tribe" going communally, it might not be in your BEST interest to help out too much, since you want to try keep your hand better than the rest of the players.

JackDarwid
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Team games

If there's a big goal for all players, it's a team game
but if there's an individual scoring, then it is a competitive game.

A team game (works together), but the game will have an individual scoring (so everyone will do their best to get the score, but always look on the big goal so they don't lose, because if they lose as a team, the individual score is useless).

Is that what this discussion about ?

Then the Al-Cabohne card game comes to my mind. You play againts each other, but if the mafia wins, you both lose. If the mafia don't win, at the end the highest core wins the game.

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