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Board Size

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Anonymous

I am in the process of putting together a prototype and was very pleased to discover your website.
Of necessity, my board will have to be as large as possible and I would like to know what the maximum acceptable board/box size would be. Any advice on this score would be greatly appreciated.

zaiga
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Joined: 12/31/1969
Board Size

The largest gameboards of the games that I have in my collection are 4 times A4 format (Andromeda, Union Pacific, Euphrates & Tigris). They can be folded back to A4 format and fit into an A4-sized box.

Perhaps you can go a little bit bigger than that and have a 6x A4 sized board, but I have never seen them so I don

Brykovian
Brykovian's picture
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Joined: 07/21/2008
Board Size

It would depend upon what surface your players will be expecting to play on. I recently bought Eagle Games

Scurra
Scurra's picture
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Joined: 09/11/2008
Board Size

Quote:
17-06-2003 at 06:20, zaiga wrote:
The largest gameboards of the games that I have in my collection are 4 times A4 format (Andromeda, Union Pacific, Euphrates & Tigris). They can be folded back to A4 format and fit into an A4-sized box.

That would be A2 then, would it? (A3 is A2 folded in half, and A4 is A3 folded in half, IYSWIM.)
I would certainly concur that A2 is about as large as you reasonably want if people are to be able to reach across it without trouble.

Anonymous
Board Game Sizes

While Gameboards can be hand wrapped in much larger sizes, they are general run for mass production volumes on a Crathern and Smith Flatboard Laminator with Automatic Spotters.
These machines have a few size restrictions. The largest gameboard to be easily run is 23-1/2" x 23-1/2" This can then be die cut after it has been wrapped and labled to be a quad fold board of 12 x 12" ish.
Most production trivia style games will be a 20" quad fold to 10" x 10"
While monopoly style games will be a single fold 19" x 19".
I agree with above notes that while graphics play a part in game design, there are practical considerations such as sizes of kitchen tables at home play surfaces.
In addition costs of boards increase exponentially when they cannot be machine run. Cheers.

FastLearner
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Joined: 12/31/1969
Board Size

Gameguys, can you folks create European-style folding boards, where there's no gulley/valley on the board when it's unfolded?

Anonymous
Game Board size

I have a game that is basically a grid 40 squares across, with pawns moving from square to square.

My question is, if the game board can be only 24 inches, my squares are going to be pretty small.

What is the size of a typical, generic game pawn, and does my layout seem practical?

Anonymous
Board Size

FastLearner wrote:
Gameguys, can you folks create European-style folding boards, where there's no gulley/valley on the board when it's unfolded?

Yes, we can do that in China. It's just a scored cut on one side with some reinforcement tape under the back layer on the seam.

As far as large boards go, I would try to stay in the magical 20"x20" or 19"x19" zone. That way, you can do a quad-fold board in a 10"x10" box. Having a smaller box is much more attractive to retailers! Remember, shelf space is real estate.

Anonymous
Board Size

Yes, we can do that in China. It's just a scored cut on one side with some reinforcement tape under the back layer on the seam.

As far as large boards go, I would try to stay in the magical 20"x20" or 19"x19" zone. That way, you can do a quad-fold board in a 10"x10" box. Having a smaller box is much more attractive to retailers! Remember, shelf space is real estate.

I have to agree.. I try to stick with 18"X18", this leaves a little room for play in the box and assures that you'll get boxes at a nice prices (since this seems to be the standard...)..
Satori

Oracle
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Joined: 06/22/2010
Board Size

Formula DE uses 2 boards that fit beside each other to get a large board size and relatively small box. The board is around 30x50", but 2 quad-fold boards let it fold to around 12x15.

Jason

NuYawkDawg
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Joined: 08/22/2009
non-standard board

what would be the approximate cost for a custom die-cut board? there are 16 pieces to the completed board and the total size is 20 x 20. there are four large non-perfect hexagons that form the middle, 8 parallelagrams and 4 triangles that form the outer board. they all can go together into a box slightly smaller than 8.5 x 11 including the pawns. would we be better off in the beginning just cutting them out ourselves from foamcore or somesuch? the reasoning behind so many pieces is to provide a somewhat random board for each playing of the game. the hard part was getting the graphics to match up (paths, resources and such).

thanks

Anonymous
Board Size

Die-Cutting is a pretty inexpensive manufacturing process. The only real extra expense would be the creation of the tooling to create the die-cuts. This would be in the neighborhood of $550.00. After that, it's just the costs of materials (chipboard, etc.)

Anonymous
Board Size

There's a link in the web resources for a "German game components" company that has many selections of iregulat board tiles that piece together (pentagrams, triangles, etc.) to create a whole board. It's under the "Sonderangebote" heading (yes, the whole site is in German, but many pictures so that you can find what you need). If you print your pieces onto label shets you could cut them out to fit on these tiles. Not bad for prototyping.

As for board size, I am fortunate enough to have access to a large format printer (prints a max size of A2--roughly 16.5" x 23.4"), but even still I try to limit the size of the board to 19" or 20" since that seems to be the "standard" for most of the types of games that I work on.

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