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card for a game.

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Anonymous

I am making a war game and i am wandering how to make the cards for it. I have index card but there are bigger then reg cards lik pokeman card or yu-gi-oh cards. how can i make card like that, whice are smaller then reg index cards, and smother then idex cards. i have like to mony and i am 13 years old so i cant really do as mush as the adult can. :lol: please help me. ANY idea may do! :wink:

Dralius
Dralius's picture
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Joined: 07/26/2008
card for a game.

Dear Elfcomander

Don't let being 13 years old stop you from making games or the fact that you have little or no money. You have a great tool to help you make all sorts of things, :!: Your Computer :!:

I make all sorts of games using not much more than the software that came with windows 98. You know Word and Paint. Look at the download section for a card template. You can glue them to note card stock or if you have a old deck of playing cards they work even better.

prophx
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Joined: 08/13/2008
card for a game.

Something I found works great is just to print the cards onto paper, cut them out, and put them into card sleeves (like the ones for trading cards or baseball cards). You can find clear sleeves at most sport collectible stores at 75 cents for 100. These work great, but even better are the fancy ones with metallic backing, but they are around $3 for 60. Print on a little heavier paper if you can so there is no bleed through to the back of the card. They shuffle decently and are held in the hand comfortably also.

Anonymous
card for a game.

wow thanx guys! they both sound awesome! thanx Dralius for the confadent. Il make a game if it take years!!! 8) and the card protecter thing ppl use for there "Nice" card itea sounds great! ill cheack the download page Dralius. thanx again! :D

Deviant
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Joined: 12/31/1969
card for a game.

Like Dralius, I design and print all my cards on the computer. MS Paint is better than nothing, but there are much better programs than this out there. You can get the GIMP as freeware on the BGDF here: http://www.bgdf.com/modules.php?name=Downloads&d_op=viewdownload&cid=4 . Like most of these programs, the learning curve is steep, but it is amazing how much time and effort this software can save you in the long run. If you can find an old edition of Photoshop or CorelDraw, these may be better programs in the long run, though.

You can get cardstock (thick paper) for printing at any office supply store, and run it through most home printers. If you find that cutting cards with scissors is too tedious, the same stores sell small cutting boards for as little as $10. I use one of these. It's tempting to use one of those huge cutting boards like the schools have and get ten pages cut in a few chops. Don't. From my experience, this is imprecise to the point where whole pages will be ruined. One page at a time is slow but more rewarding.

Absolutely use a computer to design, but save a backup to CD-RW/disk! The advantages are you can print any number of copies easily, make small changes. Once your game is polished, local printers can take your data and print beautiful cards with a glossy sheen - not Bicycle quality, but good enough to submit to the publishers.

P.S.: If the index cards are too big and bulky, cut them in half. Half an index card is easier to hold in your hand, and more stiff.

SVan
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Joined: 10/02/2008
card for a game.

Index cards cut in half do work and make good fill ins when you need something fast. They can be shuffled, but it is a pain. They also are small, so you can't write too much, or have to write small (which may make it hard to play as well.)

I like the idea about the cardstock and cutting board. I may go that route instead of taking it to the printer on my first beta version.

Yekrats
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Joined: 08/11/2008
The "Gimp"

Deviant wrote:
You can get the GIMP as freeware on the BGDF here: http://www.bgdf.com/modules.php?name=Downloads&d_op=viewdownload&cid=4 . Like most of these programs, the learning curve is steep, but it is amazing how much time and effort this software can save you in the long run. If you can find an old edition of Photoshop or CorelDraw, these may be better programs in the long run, though.

Actually, I used the Gimp for a professional project: Monkeys on the Moon http://www.eightfootllama.com/motm.htm. Layers definately make art projects easier. Though, as you said, the learning curve is somewhat steep.

-- Scott S.

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