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Cards and Board possibilities

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Trickydicky
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Joined: 12/31/1969

I've been trying to put together a couple of nice prototypes for two of my games, and I haven't completely decided on methods for doing such. I have a couple of questions in general and about the protoparts stuff.

CARDS

Each of these games have around 75+ cards in them. Thus far I have them on 110 weight cardstock, that I cut out in straight lines. This works ok, but I'd like something better. I've thought about buying cheap playing cards and printing my cards on labels that fit right on top of the cards. This seems like a lot of work for 150+ cards. Are the protoparts card sheets a heavier card stock than 110? Are they more like playing cards or like cardstock? Has anyone used them and found they can hold up to a number of games without too much wear and tear?

BOARD

In one of these games the board is made up of tiles with 7 hexes in a circle (1 in the center and 6 around the edges). This hexes are laid out like a "Settler's" board. The cardstock I have it on doesn't work well at all. I've bought some old games, in order to cut up the game boards and print and cut stickers to fit on them to make my tiles. This too seems like a lot of work (there are 24 tiles in the game). Can you run the Protoparts boards through a printer? How big are each of the quadrants (since I will actually be cutting them into my tiles)? How easy is it to cut them?

Any info would help.

Thanks

VeritasGames
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Joined: 08/01/2008
Cards and Board possibilities

You are going about this the wrong way. Why are you carving up hexes when games with hexes are readily available and when blank hexes are available.

Full page gloss labels are available for inkjet printers. Get one. Get some hexes. Overprint each hex symbol so that it is slightly larger than the hex it has to fit on OR underprint the colored part and give each hex a black edge which you overprint a little larger. Printing slightly larger than you need (either with the image proper or with a border) you will make registration with the hexes a lot easier.

Cut out the label a bit larger than the hex. Mount the hex. Then trim with an exacto knife.

It's easiest to buy a game with hexes, but there are sites selling blank hexes (use the archives).

Take the gloss labels. Mount them. Then use a little matte or gloss plastic sealant.

---

Re: cards, they are designed to go through inkjet printers. The cards are NOT coated (not like photo paper, more like card stock), so your cards will come out like they do on uncoated paper. Ask someone who has bought them, but I _think_ they are actually on playing card stock. They are designed to print and punch out (so you don't have to cut them apart). Re: wear and tear, use collectible card game sleeves.

Anonymous
Cards and Board possibilities

Have you tried a search here for blank hexes? I know it has been mentioned in the past (with links, most likely).

From what I have seen, the protoparts cards are on card stock very close to 110# and are micro-perfed to separate (be very careful!!) and look just like cards.

Card holders are a great way to prototype withouh having to laminate your cards. They will keep them in great shape and will be very easy to make changes to the cards (or replace them with new cards).

Trickydicky
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Joined: 12/31/1969
Cards and Board possibilities

Thanks for your help so far.

In regards to the hexes I think I didn't explain myself well. I need 7 hexes that are connected together. These hexes make up one tile. It is important that each tile is completely together but also separate and moveable from all other tiles. I don't think that laminating individual hexes would be worth it since I would then have to connect seven of them together some how. This is why I am planning on cutting them out. Single hexes don't really me any good.

Are there any cheap games that have a tile layout like I've described (1 hex surrounded by six others, all of them connected to each other on 1 tile)?

The card game sleeves is a great idea. That way I wouldn't even have to print on anything other than paper. I could just slip the paper in on top of a regular card.

Thanks for your help so far.

VeritasGames
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Joined: 08/01/2008
Cards and Board possibilities

If you print cards on paper you'll need to put a normal card in the sleeve as well. Plain paper and card sleeves just don't shuffle well.

Re: the other hexes -- do they need to be secret (shuffled face down) or are they always face up. If they are always face up, then our ideas still work. You can just mount multiple hexes onto a piece of clear laminating film from and back. It'll still keep you from precision cutting the hexes from stiff board.

If you are hellbent on doing it, get the material that they frame and back prints on at a craft store. It's called "matting material". It's not hard to cut through, but it's pretty stiff. That's probably your best best for something that's easy to cut but sturdy.

Trickydicky
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Joined: 12/31/1969
Cards and Board possibilities

The tiles are shuffled and put face down. They are also moved and manipulated by the players through the game. One of the reasons I want them nicer than my 110# tiles is that it is just a pain in the butt trying to move them and get them to fit back together each time.

Re: framing Mats, duh!!!!!!
My dad has a side job/hobby of framing pictures. He has framing matts everywhere. Why didn't I think of that before? Thank you for seeing, what to me should have been obvious!!

Thanks

Anonymous
Cards and Board possibilities

Trickydicky wrote:

Are there any cheap games that have a tile layout like I've described (1 hex surrounded by six others, all of them connected to each other on 1 tile)?

Attika has 22 tiles that are exactly what you described. I wouldn't necessarily say that it's "cheap". On sale at funagain it is $22.95.

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