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Ellison Prestige Die Cutter

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IngredientX
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Joined: 07/26/2008

I'm looking at the Ellison Prestige Die Cutter and its cheaper little brother, the Sizzix die cutter.

Anyone know how well this product works to cut out several cards at a time? The Prestige die cutter has a playing card die available that might suit our needs.

The perforated playing cards Darke is getting us will probably cause me to postpone this decision, but I'm just considering possibilities.

If anyone has personal experience with this that they care to share, I'd be curious. It would help my prototype production process greatly.

Thanks!

FastLearner
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Joined: 12/31/1969
Re: Ellison Prestige Die Cutter

IngredientX wrote:
I'm looking at the Ellison Prestige Die Cutter and its cheaper little brother, the Sizzix die cutter.

Anyone know how well this product works to cut out several cards at a time? The Prestige die cutter has a playing card die available that might suit our needs.
I want the Prestige very much, as the die looks pretty good (I had them fax me the actual outlines, and they're bridge sized). It's pretty pricey, though, so I've held off.

I have a Sizzix now. It works great for punching out circles (which is all I've used it for), but the lack of a card die is quite frustrating. Both my gf and I send them emails every other month or so, asking for a playing card die for it, but so far no luck.

FYI it punches through two layers of laminate, two layers of cardstock, and two layers of chipboard (all sandwiched together with spray glue) just fine. Any thicker than that and I wouldn't be able to slide it in under the cutter, but that thickness is fine. As such I imagine it would be able to cut through about 4 or 5 layers of laminated cards, about 8 or 10 layers of just cardstock cards, and about 6 or so layers of 80# cover stock cards.

Quote:
The perforated playing cards Darke is getting us will probably cause me to postpone this decision, but I'm just considering possibilities.

The die cut sheets will be great for early prototypes (for me), but for later prototypes I prefer to have them laminated (with my Xyron cold laminator), and pre-perfed cards won't help with that.

Quote:
If anyone has personal experience with this that they care to share, I'd be curious. It would help my prototype production process greatly.

Hope that helps.

-- Matthew

Anonymous
Ellison Prestige Die Cutter

I print my cards, cover coated stock, in a color laser printer, cut them to 2.5" x 3.5" and then round the corners with a Lassco Corner Rounder Model 20. It handles up to .5" of cards at a time and measures just like 6" x 9" or 10". I does a beautiful job and sells for around $130.00 or so.

FastLearner
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Joined: 12/31/1969
Ellison Prestige Die Cutter

I've used hand corner rounders and, while of course they take quite a bit of time, I'm perfectly happy with them.

My issue isn't the rounding, but rather in making all of the cards precisely the same size. Shuffling is much harder to do well if the cards are even slightly different sizes, hence my desire for a die... I could have perfectly-sized cards and rounded corners, both at the same time. :)

-- Matthew

Anonymous
Ellison Prestige Die Cutter

This works for me because I used to own a printshop but can work for anyone with just a little networking:

In the University where I teach there is a printshop. I use the printshops guillotine to do it. They let me because they know I know how to operate the machine. But anyone can get perfectly cut cards too. Get to know your local printshop. It is an excellent resource. If you align all the cards next to each other to print them and use a smaller sized paper, all you have to do is set the size in the machine and they will all end up the same size. If you can't do it...they can. Visit the printshop and you will be amazed with the amount of things one can get if only we ask.

FastLearner
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Joined: 12/31/1969
Ellison Prestige Die Cutter

I've used both hydraulic and manual guillotines many times, and have worked in a print shop. Unfortunately most of the time I'm working on my prototypes around midnight, making it considerably more difficult, but I might work out making friends with a print shop again anyway.

In the meantime I'm going to try to create the same effect by building a bit of a jig for my rotary cutter.

Thanks for the good advice!

-- Matthew

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