Skip to Content

Making cards

7 replies [Last post]
Anonymous

How do I make cards to print. Using graphics and such. Any easy templet?

Anonymous
Making cards

You will no doubt get a hundred answers to this question. What I personally find easiest is to simply make tables in MS Word. It's easiest to me because that's what I know how to do; bang out a simple template, and then use a field mergse from a MS Access databse to fill out the particular cards.

Anonymous
Making cards

Probably because of my programming background, I'm currently using XML. XSLT and CSS give me the ability to lay out cards any way I want and feed the card data into it. Then I just load up the cards in my browser and print.

The advantage to XML is that when I've got a good prototype, I can then use the same data file to generate more finished-looking card images with a custom graphics program I will write.

The fun part is cutting them out, since I'm not using dimensions supported by Avery.

Anonymous
Making cards

There are several good threads on this topic (search tool is a great resource) in the Game Production forum.

Just browsing the titles of the threads you should be able to find many related discussion.

Best of luck!!

Anonymous
Making cards

I usually put together all my individual card art using paintbrush (in Windows 9x and above, hit the start button, choose "run" and type "pbrush", followed by enter).

For simple geometric artwork, I just use constructive geometric techniques, which are better detailed elsewhere (although I could whip together a quick tutorial).

For more meaningful or representative graphics, I usually just use Google Images to find what kind of picture I need. Remember, for a prototype, you don't have to pay any royalties. Prototypes are for demonstration purposes only.

Once I've gotten the individual cards done (make sure they're the right size: Most card games use 2.5" x 3.5" cards, and 200 dpi or higher is recommended) I copy and paste them into a large image, big enough to fit 8 on a single page, making sure that for each page, the cards are in the same locations.

Next, I go to my local print shop (Not Kinkos or CopyMax, but an actual print shop: Look them up in the yellow pages), and get some 12 point cardstock precision cut to size. Last time, I was able to get about 1300 cards for $10.00, but your mileage may vary. Make sure you mention that the cardstock has to take whatever kind of ink you're using in your printer.

Now for the clever bit. Print one of the pages on plain paper. Get some post-it or off brand sticky-notes, and (one at a time) cut the sticky strip off, and tape it in the center of one of the card images on your test page. Stick a blank card over the card image, and print the page again, making sure to put it through the printer the same direction as the last time. Et ViolĂ , your cards are precision cut, and fairly well aligned. If you've made sure the card images are in the same locations on each page, you shouldn't have any trouble using the same carrier sheet again and again, although I would only use it once per prototype.

The same techniques can be used for virtually any size card. Make sure you make the images just a hair larger than the cards to completely cover the card, or, if you're comfortable with a white border, slightly smaller. Good luck.

phpbbadmin
Offline
Joined: 04/23/2013
Making cards

thedalek wrote:

Now for the clever bit. Print one of the pages on plain paper. Get some post-it or off brand sticky-notes, and (one at a time) cut the sticky strip off, and tape it in the center of one of the card images on your test page. Stick a blank card over the card image, and print the page again, making sure to put it through the printer the same direction as the last time. Et ViolĂ , your cards are precision cut, and fairly well aligned. If you've made sure the card images are in the same locations on each page, you shouldn't have any trouble using the same carrier sheet again and again, although I would only use it once per prototype.

Interesting technique... You've never had any problems with the cards slipping when you feed them back through? Or perphaps I'm not visualizing your technique correctly..

-Darke

Anonymous
Making cards

Darkehorse wrote:

Interesting technique... You've never had any problems with the cards slipping when you feed them back through? Or perphaps I'm not visualizing your technique correctly..

-Darke

Never had any problems, at least, not in that respect. The sticky notes hold them in place without being sticky enough to tear them.

The one problem I've had is that on very rare occasions, my printer will -think- it's loaded the paper when, in fact, it hasn't. So it'll start printing on nothingness, and actually load the page at a random point afterwards, with nothing aligned at all. This is solved by pre-loading the paper.

I just wish I could try it on a color laser printer, but the local copy centers won't let me put anything through on a carrier sheet.

Oracle
Offline
Joined: 06/22/2010
Making cards

thedalek wrote:
Never had any problems, at least, not in that respect. The sticky notes hold them in place without being sticky enough to tear them.

I'm impressed that the sticky notes are strong enough. I've tried something similar with masking tape, but I put the tape partly over the front of the card and partly on the back paper.

I found it to be too much work, I couldn't get a nice full-bleed card because the tape was in front, and it jammed the printer much too often. It sounds like your method solves the first two of these problems at least.

I've been using business card sheets lately and I was planning to order some of the cards from the protoparts store when I get to the point where I need them.

Syndicate content


forum | by Dr. Radut