Skip to Content

New printer, need advice

15 replies [Last post]
Anonymous

I recently bought an Epson stylus CX4600
I bought card stock paper (110 lbs) and it prints wonderfully on it.
Unfornatualy 110 lbs might not be thick enough.
I looked up the specs. and it says it will print to .27mm
Does anyone know how thick I can go, or how thick .27mm would be in paper pounds?

TargetBoy
Offline
Joined: 08/13/2008
No answers, but another question

Can you buy cardstock heavier than 110lb? That's the heaviest I've been able to find at an office supply store or craft store. Unless you count the 1+mm cardboard for framing pictures, and that is way too heavy to cut easily.

markmist
Offline
Joined: 12/31/1969
New printer, need advice

I have a Epson CX3200. I have been using the 110 lb. card stock. It really is the thickest you can find that will work well in an inkjet. That is, unless the protoparts card stock is better.

The 110 lb. card stock is completely usuable for a prototype and holds up fairly well. I have no complaints about it. I tried using a small laminator to laminate the cards, but you don't really achieve professional grade that way (the cards come out too slick and glossy).

Another option might be to print a separate front and back and paste them together? I have not personally tried it, but it might be worth a shot.

Anonymous
New printer, need advice

I am not sure if you can get more than 110 lb paper from an office supply store. I will stop by the printers tomorrow and check out what they have to say.

TargetBoy
Offline
Joined: 08/13/2008
How I prototype

For things I print myself, I am a big fan of Avery full page labels. This is just a great big, 8.5"x11" sticker that your printer will handle easily. They print as well as or better than cardstock, and you can stick them on whatever you want.

I generally use cereal boxes. The cardboard is the perfect thickness. You can cut it easily but it is thick enough that counters areeasy to handle.

VeritasGames
VeritasGames's picture
Offline
Joined: 08/01/2008
New printer, need advice

1 millimeter = 0.0393700787 inches
1 mil = .001 inches
1 mil = 1 point

.27 millimeters = 0.010629921249 inches

.27 millimeters = 10.6 mils
.27 millimeters = 10.6 points

Epson high quality photo paper is about 10.4 mils thick and is 250 gsm stock. So you can handle something very slightly thicker than photopaper reliably.

110-pound index paper is approximately .0085" (8.5 mils) in thickness.

Now you can handle 10.6 mils and

10.6 / 8.5 = 1.247

So, if my math is right, you can handle a pound weight of card stock about 1.247 times that of 110 pound card stock, or about 137 pound stock.

People DO make 130 pound stock, but it's not common in office supply stores. And, because of the way U.S. pound weights are calculated for stocks, 130 pound of one type of stock may be thicker than 130 pound weight of another kind of stock. If you want to try 130 pound stock, I recommend you acquire a couple of sample sheets.

Or alternately, acquire a couple of sheets of commonly available 65 pound index and glue them together and feed them through your printer.

Now, technically, you can probably handle something a bit thicker than this but you risk a higher percentage chance of ink smears or jamming.

The weight of a stock depends on its density. For instance you could theoretically make 10.6 point stock out of lead and it would weigh a huge amount compared to normal paper.

If you need stock thicker than 110 pound stock going through a typical low end ink jet, I'd recommend using 110 pound stock or photo paper and then laminating it.

I'm sort of stretching my limits of the understanding of printer tech to answer your question, so I may be completely wrong. Take my answers with a grain of salt and don't blame me if my suggestions jam your printer.

Anonymous
New printer, need advice

VeritasGames, thank you. That was exactly the answer I was looking for.

seo
seo's picture
Offline
Joined: 07/21/2008
New printer, need advice

VeritasGames wrote:
I'm sort of stretching my limits of the understanding of printer tech to answer your question, so I may be completely wrong. Take my answers with a grain of salt and don't blame me if my suggestions jam your printer.

Rather than printer tech, I would say paper tech. ;-)

Actually, paper thickness and paper weight are two separate issues, because different papers have different thickness/weight ratios.

Coated papers are usually heavier or less thick (it's up to how you look at it) than uncoated papers, because the coating is heavier than the paper pulp. So a 250gr uncoated paper would be thicker than a 250gr coated paper. Uncoated papers are usually more stiff than coated papers of the same weight.

VeritasGames wrote:
1 mil = 1 point
.27 millimeters = 10.6 points

I'm not sure what points have to do here, but if you mean type measurment points, as in "12 point Times New Roman", then no. I is:

1 mil = 0.07227 points
.27 millimeters = 0.7682244 points
Because 1 inch = 72 points (1 inch = 6 picas, 1 pica = 12 points).

Other than that, I think the core of VeritasGames is perfectly right.

TargetBoy suggestion of full page labels would give you a wider range of cardstock widths, though it adds a bit of extra work.

Seo

VeritasGames
VeritasGames's picture
Offline
Joined: 08/01/2008
New printer, need advice

seo wrote:

Actually, paper thickness and paper weight are two separate issues, because different papers have different thickness/weight ratios.

Right, which is why I said:

"The weight of a stock depends on its density. For instance you could theoretically make 10.6 point stock out of lead and it would weigh a huge amount compared to normal paper. "

I tried to take this into account. The reason I couldn't do it accurately, is that pound weight is not a universal measure, because it's # of pounds per 500 standard sheets, and a standard sheet size actually varies A LOT from stock type to stock type and I didn't have a sheet size calculator in front of me. I think 65 pound index stock, 110 pound index stock, and 130 pound index stock are weights on the same scale of standard sheet sizes, however I'm not sure and therein was the guesswork.

For instance, pound weights of typing paper are NOT directly comparable to pound weights of card stock because the sheet sizes that those papers are ORIGINALLY (not in the stores) shipped in. So you can't readily compare their densities.

Quote:
I'm not sure what points have to do here, but if you mean type measurment points, as in "12 point Times New Roman", then no. I is:

No, I mean "caliper points". Calipers are used to measure the thickness of paper in "mils" or "points" which equal .001 inches. The measurements you listed have NOTHING to do with caliper points. They are type points which are different things.

For paper thickness

1 mil = 1 point = .001 inches

Period.

seo
seo's picture
Offline
Joined: 07/21/2008
New printer, need advice

VeritasGames wrote:
Right, which is why I said:

"The weight of a stock depends on its density. For instance you could theoretically make 10.6 point stock out of lead and it would weigh a huge amount compared to normal paper. "

Ouch! I missed that paragraph. Sorry. :-(

I had no idea how paper weight is measured in pounds. I'm metric. ;-)
Paper weight in grams is based on a square meter, no matter what the size of the original sheet of paper is measured, so I guess our life is easier here when it comes to compare paper weights.

Still, as you correctly said (and I missed in my previous post), paper density makes impossible to accurately deduce paper thickness from its weight, or viceversa.

VeritasGames wrote:
No, I mean "caliper points".

Now I got it. Sorry again. Language issues on my side. This things happen when you're reading/writing in a foreign language. And by "you", I mean me.

I hope you're not upset.

Seo

VeritasGames
VeritasGames's picture
Offline
Joined: 08/01/2008
New printer, need advice

seo wrote:
I had no idea how paper weight is measured in pounds. I'm metric. ;-)
Paper weight in grams is based on a square meter, no matter what the size of the original sheet of paper is measured, so I guess our life is easier here when it comes to compare paper weights.

Pound weight is based on the weight of 500 "standard-sized" sheets of the stock. Unfortunately standard sizes for a given stock vary from a standard size for a different type of stock. So Bible Paper comes in different standard sized sheets from card stock.

It's a nightmare.

Grams per square meter is a much more sensible system.

Mils and Points aren't density measures. They are thickness measures (in thousandths of an inch) and are very commonly used system throughout the world. Oddly enough, I never hear of stock thickness measured in metrics even in countries using the metric system. Stocks are commonly referred to as "14 point cover stock", for instance.

seo wrote:
I hope you're not upset.

Seo

Who's upset? Not me. I just wanted to make sure that nobody tried to use your point measurements, which are for a different field altogether. Caliper Points and Font Points are completely different.

Have a great day.

VeritasGames
VeritasGames's picture
Offline
Joined: 08/01/2008
New printer, need advice

I thought the following link might clarify some of the relationship between a sampling of different stocks. It's got the GSM and Point size of a number of stocks.

http://www.perforatedpaper.com/PaperConversion.aspx

Anonymous
New printer, need advice

VeritasGames wrote:
Caliper Points and Font Points are completely different.

And font points come in two different varieties: printer's points and postscript points, which are slightly different from each other!\

(I couldn't resist adding to the confusion surrounding usage of the word "points".)

seo
seo's picture
Offline
Joined: 07/21/2008
New printer, need advice

SiskNY wrote:
And font points come in two different varieties: printer's points and postscript points, which are slightly different from each other!\

(I couldn't resist adding to the confusion surrounding usage of the word "points".)

If the confusion (I started) wasn't enough, add to the Pica Points the Didot (french typographic) points. Here you have the exact measures of all three points. And this has became totally offtopic now.

Seo

VeritasGames
VeritasGames's picture
Offline
Joined: 08/01/2008
New printer, need advice

Oops, see my last post. I left off the link originally with a sample point vs. index vs. GSM comparison chart.

Deviant
Offline
Joined: 12/31/1969
New printer, need advice

This might take a little time, but here is a quick fix for your problem.

1. Print your game pieces on 110lb cardstock.
2. Glue the opposite side. For best results, smooth the glue with a brush so that it coats the page completely. Work quickly so the page doesn't warp.
3. Carefully glue a second sheet of cardstock to the first. Pat down firmly so there are no air pockets between the two sheets.
4. Put a big, heavy book on the sandwiched sheets. Actually, use several books. Allow to dry completely before removing. This prevents warpage. VERY important!
5. Enjoy your 220lb cardstock!

Obviously, if your pieces need a backing you should print this on the second sheet before gluing them together. I wouldn't suggest printing on anything heavier than 110lb cardstock with a desktop printer, although models vary. My printer manual says not to use anything heavier than 80lb or I void my warranty. Oops! Consider it voided.

I used this process to make map tiles for "The Hunting of the Snark" (check the archives), and a few other games. It works best when the pieces you cut out are fairly small (smaller pieces feel stiffer). If you're interested in a professional-looking game board, however, print on full-page label paper and stick it on matboard.

Syndicate content


forum | by Dr. Radut