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Single fold vs. Quad-fold boards [More]

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Anonymous

Personally, I prefer to work with the single-fold boards as attaching the graphics to them is much less complicated. I normally print the graphics for my games at Kinkos and apply them in one full piece to a board using spray mount. With the quad-fold board I either have to print the graphics in four sections or cut the pieces apart with an exacto knife. It's much too time consuming and tedious. It also doesn't look as good. (At least, my results don't)

Up until very recently, I had been using a cheap checkers set for my game boards. It was a 14" x 14" single-fold board that sold for $3.50 at Walgreens. It also game with a nice box that could be spray painted silver to compliment my game's sci-fi theme. Unfortunately, the manufacturer (Cardinal) has now switched to a very flimsy board which no longer suits my purposes. As such, I'm now looking for another source for cheap single fold game boards.

I recently e-mailed Tom from Protoparts to see if they would be willing to eventually carry single-fold blank game boards with boxes. I was told that if there is enough interest, he would order some. In any event, if you are interested, I would suggest e-mailing protoparts at protoparts@hotmail.com and let them know.

Anonymous
Single fold vs. Quad-fold boards [More]

I believe there is another BGDF user that has a large number of "monopoly-style" boards that are left over from a game that he had printed. No one ever specifically asked if they are single-fold or quad-fold, but it sounded like single fold (the old monopoly standard). The thread where the beards are discussed is here.

Anonymous
Single fold vs. Quad-fold boards [More]

Alternatively, it really isn't terribly hard to make a good quality single fold board (quad-fold boards are a little trickier). If you're already good at spray mounting your game artwork onto the face of the board, then you already have the skills you need to make the rest of the board. Here's a really quick method that would work:

Materials Needed:
1 sheet chipboard as big or bigger than the finished board size
1 roll hinge tape (also called bookbinders tape)
1 roll backing paper at least 1.5" longer and wider than the finished board size
1 dowel, .25" square (optional)
1 roll painters tape, minimum 2" wide
Spray mount (which you already have)
Ability to press board firmly and smoothly (which I assume you already have)

Get a sheet of single or 2-ply chip board (also called pressboard or box-board). It is produced in a single thickness and then laminated together to form varying thickness based on the number of plies used. Single ply is typically used for making boxes. 2-ply is an ideal thickness for good sturdy game boards or tiles. 3 or more ply is available but is very thick and would prove a challenge to cut evenly.

Once you have chip board, cut out two pieces of equal size that are the width of your game board and 1/2 the length minus .25" (for the gutter). For a 20x20 board (for example), you would need a length of 1/2(20-.25) = 1/2(19.75) = 9.875". For a 20x20 board you would need 2 boards that are 20 x 9.875.

Next place the boards so that they line up perfectly with a .25" gutter between them. I suggest using a .25" square dowel as a spacer to ensure exact and even spacing. Use the painters tape to hold the two pieces securely (be sure the painters tape isn't longer than the board). Remove the spacer dowel and flip your board over. Cut a piece of hinge tape that is 1.5" wider than the board and apply to the board so that it is centered on the gutter and has .75" hanging off either end. Press firmly down, but do not crease into the gutter. Flip board back over and fold extra tape that is overhanging the board back onto the front of the board. Be sure it is tight around the edge of the board. Press this part firmly into the gutter.

Cut a piece of backing paper that is 1.5" wider and longer than the finished size of your board (you want to leave .75" to wrap around the board). Trim the corners at 45 degree angles about .25" from the corners of the board. This will leave less material to fold under when wrapping the backing onto the face of the board. It should look like this:

At this point you are ready to adhere the backing to the board. Using your spray mount, evenly coat the backing and apply so that the board is in the middle. Carefully and evenly fold the overhang around to the face of the board. Once done, press flat and smooth using whatever method you use currently when applying the facing. I use two 2'x2' pieces of 3/4" plywood (hardwood facing so it is smooth) and wax paper to line them (in case any glue bleeds out). I then pile on a few hundred pounds of regular free weights and leave it overnight.

Now you're ready for the facing! Note that the unfaced boards may curl slightly until the facing is put on, which will equalize the forces of the backing on the board core. If you want to produce a lot of boards of the same size, you can contact a paper manufacturer to precut an order of chipboard for you to the size you need. Just be sure of the thickness you're getting before you pay for the full order! Ask for a sample.

Best of luck to you!

nosissies
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Joined: 07/26/2008
Single fold vs. Quad-fold boards [More]

Nice instructions Steve, Thanks!

Any chance we can comission similar instructions for set-up boxes?

Also, one other question... what do you recommend for backing paper on the board? Can you point us at any online suppliers?

Thanks!
Tom

Anonymous
Single fold vs. Quad-fold boards [More]

Thanks! It's funny that you ask about set-up boxes. One card game that I'm looking to submit to a publisher soon would benefit from the graduation from a tuck box to a set-up box (higher implied value if a game comes in a set-up box than a tuck box). I'm looking into making a set-up box for it now! I'll let you know what I come up with.

As for the backing paper, I just posted a glossary that includes a few terms about paper and cloths available. Essentially, unless you want an expensive board, stay away from book binders cloth. It's great stuff and looks VERY professional, but it's also expensive. I've seen it from $5-15 for enough to do one board.

Art supply stores have a ton of paper products. Basically any good quality paper can be used. Just stay away from construction paper or anything else that cracks easily and won't handle the repeated folding and unfolding. Art stores also usually have a variety of really cool art and hand made papers that would realy make the backing look professional.

For my own use, I picked up a few rolls of good quality colored banner paper. Each roll was $5, but will do literally dozens of boards.

nosissies
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Joined: 07/26/2008
Single fold vs. Quad-fold boards [More]

Just to complete the hijacking of this thread ...

Personally I very much appreciate the set-up box for card games, I have a few and they hold up so much better than the tuck boxes. (Rage, Mu, Bang!) The only frustration is that they are more likely to open and spill their guts, thus they get a rubber band right away.

which makes me think, why not include the rubber band with the game? why not imprinted with the game logo? A quick google for "custom rubber bands" and there are tons of vendors lined up to sell these to you :-)

ok, enough of that. Let us know if you manage to create a set-up box. I've seen instructions before, but none that I'm as comfortable with as I am with your board assembly instructions.

peace,
Tom

Anonymous
Single fold vs. Quad-fold boards [More]

Here's a follow up for anyone making their own game board. Folding the corners can be a bit tricky because of the thickness of the board material. Here's a tip that I learned from bookbinding.

Step 1:
Fold backing material that overlaps the board onto the front of the board. This can be tough, especially considering the length of the fold. Do it slowly and smoothly and you should be OK.

If you're folding over the flap that will cover part of the gutter, remember to crease the backing into the gutter.

Step 2:
Crease backing material that extends beyond the corner down onto itself, flattening it. Use your fingernail to really flatten the crease.

Step 3:
Fold back small amount, folding from the corner of the board and out. Apply small amount of adhesive but NOT spray adhesive, that would get everywhere. Use stick glue or something similar.

Repeat steps 2 and 3 for the other corner created by the fold in step 1. Then repeat steps 1-3 for the opposite (parallel) side of the board so it looks like this:

Note that in this example, the left and right edges have been folded over to the front. The top and bottom edges remain to be folded over.

Step 4:
Fold down remaining sides. Corners should form nice angles from roughly the corner of the board inwards at a nearly 45 degree angle.

Here's a sample of how the finished corner looks with the facing applied:

I would definately suggest practicing this a few times until you have a feel for it.

DSfan
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Joined: 12/31/1969
Single fold vs. Quad-fold boards [More]

Wow, SiskNY.

Very nice job with the instructions, maybe someone (Drakehorse...) should make a how-to forum with instructions on how-to make different, board game related objects. (I.E. Box making, Board making etc...)

-Justin

Anonymous
Single fold vs. Quad-fold boards [More]

nosissies wrote:
Any chance we can comission similar instructions for set-up boxes?

Sure, here you go!

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