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Stray thought... partially self printing.

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Stony
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Joined: 06/24/2010

When producing a game, you need to consider the costs of producing the various parts, and even the rules handbook will add some costs. This cost will reflect itself onto the final price of the product in the stores, as the producer want XX% profit on top of the bare costs. The distributor also adds XX% to the price. And the final store does so too. So the rather small cost of producing the rules, will add up to be a somewhat significant cost to the game.

My thought is, what if the game simply provided a URL for the latest edition of the rules, somewhere on the publishers website. Most people nowadays has an internet connection, and if they havn't got a printer, they usually will be able to get access to one.

This could potentially decrease the game price, and the consumer may choose to simply keep a digital version of the rules, and even if he decides to print it, the combined cost will most likely still be below what he would have to pay for the profesionally printed rules including profit for the various links in the publisher-consumer chain.

Is it worth a thought?

Dralius
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Joined: 07/26/2008
Stray thought... partially self printing.

It is certainly an interesting idea, I am not sure it would fly. The printing of rules is possibly the most inexpensive part of the game and the purchaser may only save $.60 in the end unless you getting into something fancy which they could not produce cheaply at home anyways. The convenience of having the rules come with the game is worth that price too me. I suspect that Joe Average would feel the same.

Anonymous
Stray thought... partially self printing.

and another minor thought is the fact "most people have internet"... most does not entail all and if i bought a game a was told in order to play i have to print my own 30 page rulebook in order to have the rules on hand for a game at a different location than home (playing at the local game/comic shop) i probably would not keep purchasing the game from that company.

just a thought

Hedge-o-Matic
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Joined: 07/30/2008
Stray thought... partially self printing.

I agree. The rulebook is by far the cheapest component, and to have to print out your own copy in order to play would be unreasonable. It also has the disadvantages of both the distributed marketing model and the print and play model of doing business. Not a good combo.

Still, if you went the other way around, and offered up professionally produced componanat kits for print-and-play games, that'd be something else, something better than full print and play.

Anonymous
Stray thought... partially self printing.

Quote:
Still, if you went the other way around, and offered up professionally produced componanat kits for print-and-play games, that'd be something else, something better than full print and play.

interesting concept, so like D&D modules for D&D maps & everything or for Customizable Card Games (not collectible types as the chance for piracy or distribution would lower the value) new sets of cards (perhaps 12-18 cards on a pdf) alot of players use card sleeves anyways so the thickness in one would be the same as their play decks just missing the back artwork...

good thought hedge, haven't really seen alot of first party support on that concept yet but could help the smaller distribution help drive their products into the market using a secondary less expensive route.

Anonymous
Stray thought... partially self printing.

Long time lurker. First time poster...

Stony-
You're better off removing things like scorepads, pencils, and dice from a game or substituting cheaper components where possible than shipping a game with no rules.

Most (good) game companies now offer PDF rules online so players have access to updates and errata, as well as a sales tool, but unless your game is a collectible card game, you're best off shipping the game complete in the box.

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