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What would be a good card stock?

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Anonymous

Good card stock?

I'm wanting to print a few decks of prototype cards and my local printer doesn't have a good variety of paper, but he has the capacity to use the paper I furnish.

I'm wanting to order some paper (I'm new to this) that is similar to the 'feel' and thickness of Yu-gi-oh cards. I'm designing my cards in Adobe Illustrator and there will be color on both sides.

What thickness of paper should I use?

Should it be glossy on both sides?

Any good companies to order them from?

I would appreciate any help.

thx

VeritasGames
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What would be a good card stock?

Nominally you want to use a 300 gsm playing card stock, but other than that, I'd suggest a 14 point C2S.

Problem is, most copy shops won't trust things much heavier than 110 pound card stock in their machines. So this latter stock is what I use for playtest. 65 pound card stock is borderline acceptable if you use card sleeves.

Anonymous
What would be a good card stock?

Ideally, you would want to find a supplier of actual playing card stock (assuming you want to pay through the nose for the materials). Failing that, you will have to settle for some kind of non-laminate, non-opaque card stock.

I have used Wausau Exact Index 110# heavy card stock in prototypes where I wanted cards that looked and felt like real playing cards. That stock printed up and finished about as well as could be expected from a non-playing card stock. The thickness was a little more than the typical playing card stock when using 1.5 mil laminate on either side. Your printer will most likely use a varnish, so that won't be a problem and you will end up with something very close to the cards you mentioned.

Going this route, you will lose the advantage of having the opaque core of a playing card stock, but a fairly busy card back design that covers the entire card will help conceal the face of the card when held in hand. Most games don't require a full 100% opaque card stock.

Playing card stock has another advantage over regular card stock. Playing card stock is made from layers that are laminated together, which helps the card stock resist peeling from the center. Normal card stock may show peeling before a playing card stock would. My prototypes haven't yet after many playings, but it's something to watch out for.

VeritasGames
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What would be a good card stock?

He was asking about making prototypes, and most people don't sell small quantities of playing card stock. If they have sample sheets in the back storeroom they are in small quantities. Most of the playing card stock vendors I've talked to sell the stuff by the truckload and generally in large sheets or rolls.

phpbbadmin
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What would be a good card stock?

Fred,

It may be too late, but did you check this thread:?
http://www.bgdf.com/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&t=2462&highli...

I would contact Protoparts and explain your situation, he may be willing to give or sell you some samples to see if the sheets will work with your printer's equipment.

-Darke

Anonymous
What would be a good card stock?

No, it's not too late. I'm an old man (38 years) who has been making games for 15 years and haven't made the move to production yet. So, I got time.

Well, I made one move in January '91 and after getting rooked, I saw what strangely resembled my game in the Walmart's and Kmart's of the world about 10 months later under a different name. Therefore, I would like to start production myself.

Thanks for the links and advice.

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