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What makes a game a great deal?

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Dralius
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What makes a game a great deal?

If a game is the best game you ever played and only include a 112 card deck and a set of rules in a box is it worth $20 or more. Some people would never spend $20 on a card game saying it’s a rip off. On the other hand if you have a game with lots of nice bits that is not half as fun can you justify spending $40 or $50 on it? What makes you want to spend your money? While we are at it what is the best cheap game you own or your biggest big buck disappointment?

Just curious

TruMobius
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Joined: 12/31/1969
What makes a game a great deal?

As others will say the Heft factor is a big determining point....does this game feel heavy enough to be worth $20

because its a card game you also look at comprable card games and how much they cost....being one who playes Magic:The Gathering and is used to plunking down $10 for a box of 75 cards (15 of which are not worth anything as they are land) 112 cards for $20 is awseome

After Heft, Production Value comes to mind....this consists things like how pretty is the game parts: box, cards and playmat are probably they things you should focus on if its a card game

the best purchase of a game I made was at a garage sale I bought mancala for 1.00 and with class beads and a wooden board I got more than my monies worth....though the game play is not worth what it was originally priced at

Joe_Huber
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Re: What makes a game a great deal?

Dralius wrote:
What makes a game a great deal?

If a game is the best game you ever played and only include a 112 card deck and a set of rules in a box is it worth $20 or more. Some people would never spend $20 on a card game saying it’s a rip off. On the other hand if you have a game with lots of nice bits that is not half as fun can you justify spending $40 or $50 on it? What makes you want to spend your money? While we are at it what is the best cheap game you own or your biggest big buck disappointment?

A low price will help me to take a chance on a game I'm uncertain of - and occasionally lead to the discovery of a game I enjoy as a result, such as with Willi and Wuehltisch. But really the variability is much moreso in my enjoyment of the game than in the price - a good deal will just cause me to be more willing to take a chance on a game I know nothing of.

For example - Medieval is often pointed to as an overpriced game. I don't disagree - but frankly, if I enjoyed the game, I wouldn't care. I didn't pay to try it, so I don't feel ripped off - but frankly it's not something I would have picked up blind unless it were much less expensive.

Joe

Oracle
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What makes a game a great deal?

I did just pay $20 for San Juan (110 cards and a few tiles) on Saturday. I knew I'd like it; having played it quite a bit on BSW, and I'd planned to get it as soon as the English edition came out, but I was balking at the high price-to-bits ratio.

I finally ended up buying it because I was in the middle of an SoC tournament where one game went on for an hour after all the others had finished.

I knew that was one I could just start playing with a few others from the tournament and still be ready to re-join the tournament at a few minutes notice.

The best bargain would probably be from cheapass. There are a few great games they make. The Big Cheese at $3, Lord of the Fries ($7.50 for the original version, there's a much higher quality one now for $15), and Devil Bunny Needs a Ham ($2.50) come to mind as good bargains. I have a few other 3-player minimum ones that sound like they'll be great, but my game group is too snobbish to play them. They take one look at the bits and say the game doesn't look like it will be fun. Of course, cheapass has a lot of bad games and a good marketing department, so I've bought quite a few that aren't very good which brings up the average cost per good game and makes the good games pretty expensive.

The biggest disappointment was Warcraft: The Boardgame. It was $40, and for the bits included, that seems like a decent price. The game is just very broken and not any fun at all. It takes about 45 minutes of building, manuvering, and minor skirmishes. Then there's one major skirmish that
s about 2 minutes of dice rolling. That leaves one randomly choosen player destroyed and one dominating. After 45 minutes, it's completely random who will win, but it still takes another 45 minutes for the 'winner' to finish winning. It's even worse in a 3-player game. The winner of the battle will still lose by the player who stayed out, so the game goes on for hours of minor skirmishes with everyone having a maximum-sized army and just moving it around until everyone gets so fed-up they walk away from the table.

OldScratch
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Joined: 12/31/1969
What makes a game a great deal?

I think it heavily depends on the players. Some of you might be familiar with Frag from Steve Jackson Games. This game costs about $35, but only comes with a deck of cards, a couple of flimsy poster maps, and some not-even-perforated cutouts for players and counters. Is the game worth it? It's one of the funnest games my group has played. It's totally simple, quick to learn, and fun to play. I think it was a good deal, cause of the amount of fun we have with it, regardless of what came in the box.

zaiga
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Joined: 12/31/1969
What makes a game a great deal?

My best game purchase has been "Lost Cities". It's just a 60-card deck for $17, but I've literally played hundreds of games of "Lost Cities", so that's pretty good value for money in my opinion.

Worst game purchase probably is "Domaine". It's a great box of bits for $35. However, I've played it three times and never enjoyed and I don't think I'll ever play it again.

I also got "Wallenstein", which is another huge box of fantastic bits for $40. This game only got played once, but I mildly enjoyed my first playing of it and I think I might it again sometime in the future.

So, what's good value for money? If it gets a lot of playing time... at least that's my criterium.

- René Wiersma

Verseboy
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Joined: 12/31/1969
What makes a game a great deal?

I think most of us would agree that a game that gets a lot of good play is a good value at almost any price and a game that gets little play, particularly if it just isn't fun (as opposed to a good game you can't find anyone to play with), is a bad value at most price points. Furthermore, it's human nature that people will be more willing to take a chance purchasing a game that is less expensive. The one qualifier I would add to the discussion is that if I pay a lot of money for a game, I'm always going to be a little disappointed if the components aren't up to the standard suggested by the price, even if the game plays well.

Steve

rkalajian
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Joined: 12/31/1969
What makes a game a great deal?

A game, mind you not a very good one, that is very much worth the price is Vampire Hunter. I picked this "game" up for $3 at Toys R Us. Like I said, the game isn't great, but the tower's "night and day" mechanic is just too cool to pass up for $3 (plus price of batteries).

There are a few variations to make the game a little more strategic and less luck driven, and i'm sure people can come up with more to make the game more fun. Once thing for sure is that this game is all about the atmosphere. It can only be played in the dark, so the only light in the room is the eerie blue or orange of the tower in the center of the board.

If you've got a few extra bucks, this game is worth the $3.

OrlandoPat
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Joined: 10/16/2008
Perceived Value

I think it's all a question of perceived value, and that varies depending on the circumstance. Here are my two cents...

For gamers, I'm willing to bet that the perceived value lies primarily in the fun factor and the replayability. That's what lets companies like Cheap Ass Games do so well.

For people giving (or receiving) gifts, I think the value is also tied up in the "wow" factor. You want to see the person open the gift and get excited by the packaging and the components. You don't want "hmm... this looks like it might be fun", you want "wow, look at this!" That takes lots of production value.

Games that can hit both these things (Memoir from Days of Wonder, for example), can command the higher prices and no one really complains.

TruMobius, I've got a funny story about heft. At ToyFair back in February, I had a distributor pick up Ice Lake and say "sorry, it's not heavy enough to sell for $19.95." I laughed and handed him SiegeStones (a wooden board game with stone pieces). He picked it up and said "no, too heavy. The freight costs would be too high."

Anonymous
What makes a game a great deal?

Great heft story!!

Personally, I don't mind paying more for a game that I know I will enjoy and play over and over as many times as I can convince my friends to play. I'm not personally drawn to Cheapass and similar games though I will buy the ones that I think look cool. The Big Cheese was a great buy at $3 and I plan to pick up Kill Doctor Lucky at some point.

For my money, I would rather pay a little more and get the full game experience in a box. Yes, we all have tons of bits around the house and can supply all the bits needed for most games, but each game is its own universe and I like my universes to be complete.

Best percieved deal (good playability and production quality for a good price) for me was Bang!, although the extra $4 for the High Noon expansion brings the price up some. I like card games for less than $12, but I have and would again spend $20 for a card game if I thought it was worth it.

Joe_Huber wrote:
A low price will help me to take a chance on a game I'm uncertain of - and occasionally lead to the discovery of a game I enjoy as a result...

I couldn't agree more. I picked up Friedemann Friese's Landlord! because of it's low price point and it turned out to be a great game. On the other hand, I would spend more for a bigger game that I have played and enjoyed even if the cost seemed to outweigh the "heft" factor.

Zzzzz
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What makes a game a great deal?

I tend to agree with OrlandoPat, in that it is about the preceived value. And I think that the way in which people arrive at this value differs greatly on who is assessing.

If you think about mass consumers and retailers, they take into account the eye-candy, theme and hype of a game, when buying. For the most part, the average consumer will buy a game, no matter what price if theme and hype are "right for them"(Yeah Yu-gi-oh, that is a great game, everyone is playing it, I have to play it too! for an example). I think the average consumer also takes into account the "standard" pricing for similar games. If one type of Risk cost $X, another version that cost $Y better offer me more. Better components, better theme....

When you talk about people such as here at BGDF, we set other criteria that influences our purchase a game. How does it make use of mechanics, is the game play and theme fluid, is it a german style game, does the game get me thinking about design. Not to mention, just the desire to play a mountain of different games....

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