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Professional issues

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PaulS
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Joined: 04/23/2009

Hello,

I'm not sure if this is the right place to post this, so apologies if it's not.

Our Integrated Project at University involved having to create a board game. I've now moved on to the write-ups and one essay I have to write about is professional issues, and the impact of game design on society, i.e. potential offence caused, statutory/industry applicable regulations.

We chose to create a tennis board game, for ages between 9-16.

I was wondering, does anybody here have any pointers for me? Why is it important to consider professional issues, what are the main issues I should focus on?

Dralius
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Joined: 07/26/2008
Wide open subject

PaulS wrote:
I have to write about is professional issues, and the impact of game design on society, i.e. potential offence caused, statutory/industry applicable regulations.

Most board games have the equivalent impact of a insect on a truck window. They soon are wiped away. Visit www.boardgamegeek and see how many of the 30,000 + entries you know. Better yet use the advance search and see how many games you know that were produced before you were born.

Potential impact is incalculable. I know of no game that has actually had a social impact that the designers knew how big it would be. We all hope they will be but most times it’s a pipe dream. If you want to look at games that have made a real impact, Dungeons & Dragons although not a board game is one of the best examples. It has affected media significantly, shaping modern mythology and storytelling by immersing generations in heroic fantasy settings.

As for downfalls, there is always IP disputes that could be a concern. You could use a professional player’s name or tennis association without permission and find yourself with a lawsuit. This is more a publisher’s issue. As a designer it’s not your job to get these permissions. The publisher should pursue rights if they are needed or use generic terms and fictional characters.

Then there are the changing safety regulations that toy and game publishers must keep up on. See the discussion http://www.bgdf.com/node/951

I hope that give you a starting point.

PaulS
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Joined: 04/23/2009
Thank you for your reply, it

Thank you for your reply, it was very helpful and informative!

Jpwoo
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Joined: 03/26/2009
However, game design goes

However, game design goes beyond board games, Making a board game is a practical assignment in a class. As most people will make a roll and move game. But really there is little difference at the core of videogames and board games. The basic goals are the same. to create something interesting that provides either enjoyment or tension.

Fhizban
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Joined: 01/11/2009
Quote:Most board games have

Quote:
Most board games have the equivalent impact of a insect on a truck window.

Best comment on the boardgame industry in 10+ years. 'Nuff said.

gameprinter
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Joined: 08/06/2008
Society will impact your game rather than you it.

Dralius wrote:

As for downfalls, there is always IP disputes that could be a concern. You could use a professional player’s name or tennis association without permission and find yourself with a lawsuit. This is more a publisher’s issue. As a designer it’s not your job to get these permissions. The publisher should pursue rights if they are needed or use generic terms and fictional characters.

Then there are the changing safety regulations that toy and game publishers must keep up on. See the discussion http://www.bgdf.com/node/951

Bingo. Society will have a much larger impact on your game than your game will on it. The new CPSIA safety laws are a nightmare and will result in LOTS of problems if not revamped before they enforce the rules next year. The legal issues alone (even without CPSIA) are mind boggling. Better make sure you know what a "Choke Tube" is before printing a game for kids.

Other bizarre impacts are things like WalMart dictating that you only get 10.5 inches of shelf space, which means your max box interior is going to be 10.25 x 10.25. That affects the size of your board and all your other components.

End of Time Games
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gameprinter wrote:Dralius

gameprinter wrote:
Dralius wrote:

As for downfalls, there is always IP disputes that could be a concern. You could use a professional player’s name or tennis association without permission and find yourself with a lawsuit. This is more a publisher’s issue. As a designer it’s not your job to get these permissions. The publisher should pursue rights if they are needed or use generic terms and fictional characters.

Then there are the changing safety regulations that toy and game publishers must keep up on. See the discussion http://www.bgdf.com/node/951

Bingo. Society will have a much larger impact on your game than your game will on it. The new CPSIA safety laws are a nightmare and will result in LOTS of problems if not revamped before they enforce the rules next year. The legal issues alone (even without CPSIA) are mind boggling. Better make sure you know what a "Choke Tube" is before printing a game for kids.

Other bizarre impacts are things like WalMart dictating that you only get 10.5 inches of shelf space, which means your max box interior is going to be 10.25 x 10.25. That affects the size of your board and all your other components.


I think this is all vary interesting. Is it just me but when I look at games on the shelf at walmart, I'm grossed out by the sheer mundaneness and sameness of the games. What kind of attitude or I'm not thinking of the word I'm looking for so I will use outlook, does it take to conform to such a cloystered mass market. At that level, it seems to me that games loos any unique form or expression from the designer. Unless the designer is a party game fiend who loves those games. Making games for money seems like a voiceless mundane effort. Box color and theme for those games seems bright cheery and empty. I can't stand to walk through the isles in those stores.

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