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Taste in a board game??

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Dushanbetea
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Is there anyway to incorporate taste into a board game?

seo
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taste in a game

Interesting question.

I guess you could include some edible components, like jelly beans or something, which can have a variety of flavors. This would mean you have an expiration date on the components, and you'll need to replace those components after a certain number of plays, but I think both things could be done.

Actually, one GDS some time ago was about games with edible components (though taste didn't necessarily have to play a role on that challenge). Here is the link.

There are ways to print scents. I don't know how expensive this might be, and it loses strength with time. But it can be done and it's been used on jigsaw puzzles (I remember my sister had a Ravensburger one with a ship loaded of bananas, and the bananas smelled like real bananas.

gameprinter
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Taste and Smell

seo wrote:
There are ways to print scents. I don't know how expensive this might be, and it loses strength with time. But it can be done and it's been used on jigsaw puzzles (I remember my sister had a Ravensburger one with a ship loaded of bananas, and the bananas smelled like real bananas.

We printed "P.U. The Guessing Game of Smells" a couple years ago for Unknown Games. It's been picked up by Talicor since then. It had a bunch of scratch and sniff cards ranging from skunk to cinnamon. While interesting, it the technology has limitations. For one thing, I thought the smells had that "scratch and sniff" smell in common, which made it harder to determine some smells. For another, I think the smells tend to fade over time - a couple years, for sure, but it's important to note.

I'm not sure how you'd incorporate taste, per se. From a manufacturing perspective, I can't think of a hygenic way to do it. You'd need a disposable component or something that players could lick or ingest. An interesting problem!

bluesea
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Dushanbetea wrote:Is there

Dushanbetea wrote:
Is there anyway to incorporate taste into a board game?

I've always thought there might be a game that could be made using the Wine Aroma Wheel. (see links below)

If you design a game for wine tasting, you might be able to cater to a gift market within the wine tasting niche. It could be a game even centered on tasting real wines at a wine tasting party.

http://www.speiser.com/content/wine-aroma-wheel-evaluation-chart
http://www.goosecross.com/education/tasting_basics.html

InvisibleJon
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Peep War...

Although not intended, taste played an important role in one person's session of my edible war game Peep War.

From http://www.boardgamegeek.com/thread/162840

"The four of us picked our forces, laid out our hexes and supply centers, and began the game: pink chicks with toasted coconut troops, pink bunnies with pear support, purple bunnies with blueberry armies, and my own blue chicks with the dreaded black licorice jelly beans. Black jelly beans were a major component of my strategy – I love them, but I figured they would discourage my opponents from attacking. After all, one of the benefits of victory is the opportunity to eat your opponent’s troops, and I know very few other people with a hankering for the black beans."

The game: http://www.invisible-city.com/play/156/peep-war-2005-revision

Dushanbetea
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thank you thank you

you guys have been helpful... thanks a bunch!

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