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A Kickstater Game

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questccg
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So having shelved "Quest AC 2" permanently has driven me to start thinking about A GAME that will be ATTRACTIVE to the Kickstarter community. That's right, my GOAL is to design a game that 1,000+ backers will want to play.

This is a challenge, since we know that Kickstarters Backers are an odd bunch and designing a game for them is well... difficult.

Take Dan Kriss as an example:

$35k [Cancelled]: Amazing Video

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/dannkrissgames/cthulhu-the-great-ol...

$8,500 [Unsuccessful]: Pretty awesome video also

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/dannkrissgames/arkham-nights-lovecr...

$18k [Successful $27k]: A strange video

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/dannkrissgames/cthulhu-the-great-ol...

$12k [Succesful $57k]: An awesome video too

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/dannkrissgames/new-cthulhu-bicycle-...

So just studying Dan's efforts leads me to believe that the video, while entertaining, are not the reasons why people choose to back a project. It seems people are MORE interested by the GAME - and how interesting or unique the game is...

Dan demonstrates that if you FAIL, TRY, TRY again! :)

So I wonder what makes for a MORE successful campaign. Please SHARE your thoughts on this matter...

Rob Huber
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a noble goal!

...but could the lesson from the examples you set out not also be that if the goal was 250 backers they would have found success out of the blocks?
Not only that but there is nothing that would keep a successful game with a goal for 250 from reaching 1000+ backers. If that game was designed such that some pretty fun stretch goals follow that 250, all the better.
Also if you bring a game with only 250 backers to completion, you will have the good will of 250 people and a track record as a Kickstarter winner, neither of those are easy to come by or anything to sneeze at.
I guess it seems to me that if you define success as becoming "The Beatles" you might end up in the unfortunate position where you would mistake ending up as "The Yardbirds" as a failure. (Clapton, Page and Beck seem to have done alright for themselves coming out of it anyway.)

$.02

questccg
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Backers strategy

The truth of the matter is that 250 backers seems to be the norm. If you can be successful with that many backers, well that's not too bad.

And like you said, having stretch goals that are simple but EFFECTIVE is another way to attract MORE backers.

I think it's a simple formula: offer more of the game for the same price.

This is like saying BUY this at "$25.00" and if we get 1,000 backers you will get twice as many cards in the set. If we do the math, sure more backers means more money - but more CARDS implies greater COST. So it's kind of a trade-off (this for that).

Anyhow that's my thinking and where I hope to take my next game.

It is rather embryonic at the moment - because I'm not sure how the game will play out. And there is a reason for that: I had a Video Game in mind and have come to the realization that IF I can make some money with a Table Top version first, well then do that FIRST ... and later if there is still interest create a Video Game...!

Soulfinger
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I've never once watched a KS

I've never once watched a KS video for a tabletop game. Are they in the business of video production? No, nor do I need a virtual sales rep. I mostly look at the grammar in the listing. If they can't string together clean, concise sentences then the product is bound to be rife with problems. I have also passed up on a lot of KS projects because I see geek enthusiasm but no evidence of business savvy.

I also prefer sustainable business plans over one shot wonders. For example, I was thrilled to back Reaper's initial Bones offering, as it funded moving their production facility from China to the States and grew their market share -- not to mention twenty cent miniatures for me. I hate pie charts that show zero percent of the money set aside for profit and growth, because that either means that they are inflating their production estimates or that they are creating a game with zero plans for support, expansion, or community. There's no real business plan, just a myopic mission statement. I truly wish that I'd had enough money to back Soda Pop's last SDE game, because I trust the manufacturer to craft a solid product that will receive further expansions, and I am thrilled with their generous customer support (my daughter lost our dice for the original SDE game, and they shipped us out a free replacement set).

Of course, if you want to satisfy most backers, just have a good shtick and amazing artwork with excellent graphic presentation . . . or involve an Internet celebrity. Personally, I'd love to see an Oglaf RPG.

I think the lesson learned from your examples is, don't do yet another Cthulhu game. At this point, I want to run a KS to build a time machine so that I can go back and kill HP Lovecraft and William Seabrook and prevent this supersaturation of what used to be two of my favorite genres. Then again, I'd probably return home to find Biff waxing my car and dozens of movies and board games about haunted Nazi tanks or a horror pantheon based on Stephen King's The Mangler.

Rob Huber
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1000 backers

More power to you! I am from Chicago and we were literally built on the principle, "Make no little plans; they have no magic to stir men's blood."
I will happily watch, learn, and throw my two cents in if you ask for them.

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