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Board/Box Size versus Cost

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Lucas.Castro
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Joined: 10/22/2008

I read in another thread that box size often sets expectations as to the cost of a game. But now I have a question regarding more or less the reverse situation:

Is a 13" x 13" (33cm x 33cm) box too big even for a game in the $60-$80 price range?
Also, are there some special considerations associated with such a box size, with regards to retailers and shelf space?

I ask because the war game I am designing (for up to 4 players) pretty much requires a large board (barring a redesign of squads' sizes and speed). My current idea is to have a board that has 6 panels of 13" x 13" (in a 2 by 3 pattern).

Alternatively, if anyone has any suggestions of how to make a board with more folds, I would love to hear them.

Thanks!

apeloverage
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Joined: 08/01/2008
if you had a board

where there were seperate pieces that the player put together, rather than one piece that folds up, it'd fit into a smaller box and also have the advantage that you could lay the board out in different ways.

gameprinter
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Joined: 08/06/2008
Board size

Your box size is not a problem for a game that sells for $60-80 USD. Your board size might be. We deal with a two different board manufacturers for mounting our game boards. Both of them have size limits of about 23.125 x 33.125 due the equipment used to mount the board. For a 26 x 39 mounted game board, you may have to do two seperate boards that butt up to each other to form the playing area.

For an unmounted board, you may still have issues with the 39" length, since the most common largest sheet size is 28 x 40 and you usually need 1" all the way around to allow for the grippers on the press.

I hope that helps!

Lucas.Castro
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Joined: 10/22/2008
Actually

Actually, both of your responses have been very useful.

I had actually considered making separate boards, and in principle this would work extremely well with my game. The board consists of 11 large hexagon "zones", and each zone contains a grid of smaller hexes as well. Modularity could give me all kinds of fun flexibility (e.g., placing dangerous terrain in some zones, or objectives, etc).

The question that now arises is one of printing/die-cutting: I would go for each "zone" being a modular board, but this means that these boards are hex shaped (with straight edges, not jagged edges from the smaller hexes). However, to put them together, the boards would also have alternating cutouts or protrusions (like a puzzle piece).

I imagine this would have to be die-cut? Assuming all zones have the exact same shape, would this be expensive to produce (compared to a normal, multi-fold board)? And does anyone have any comments/suggestions on cardboard material holding up over time when it goes right to the edge (as I imagine would have to be true in this case, for the pieces to fit together)?

Thank you again for any advice/input.

gameprinter
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Joined: 08/06/2008
Raw Edges

What you're talking about are die cut "raw edged" boards, with no case or label wrap over the edges. This is more common than you'd think and unless players REALLY abuse the pieces, should last for years. I just played a game of Empire Builder (circa 1988) and the die cut, raw edged boards were still great after years of play and a couple years of "barn storage".

As to the issue of cost, it's hard to say. I think you're still looking at an expensive board because while die cutting a board is about the same cost as a folding board, you'll still have to have two sheets printed and have those two sheets setup on press and on the board machines and then collated together to make one set for a game. Again, this will work if you are looking at an FFG/Euro price point of $60-$80. Otherwise, you'll have a board that cost you $5 or more in a game you want to sell for $30.

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