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Hex Cards Or Hex Tiles?

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Archimedes42
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Joined: 10/15/2014

Hey everyone. I'm currently looking at creating my prototype for my civ building game 'Age Of Man', which has a lot of hex's!

Like, a lot.

(We're talking 600+tiles.) Obviously, I am going to have a problem with fitting all of these hex tiles into a decently sized box, so I took a look at hex cards. The problem with hex cards is that these hex's are going to be spread out all over the table, with pieces all over them, and some of them will even be moving around. Is this way too unpractical? Or are hex cards some hidden "component gem" that I haven't heard about yet?

Any input at all would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks.

X3M
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Joined: 10/28/2013
Some experience here

I had the same problem.

If you are willing to split up your map into smaller pieces. You could use segments.
There are 2 types of segments.
The basic triangular/rectangle/hexagon segments. Where the hexagons are simply printed on. ASL is an example of rectangle segments.
Or a segment that has complete hexagons ready.

The problem with the second way is that it is a problem to fit them together in certain ways. Maps might have dead spots where not much happens, depending on the game mechanics as well. But a good part is, they can make the map much more solid, the pieces fit better. Even if you only use flat paper or cardboard.

The problem with the basic segments is, they shift more often. And your little hexagons might be cut in halves or thirds. If your game doesn't allow it, the outer parts are left out.

With both variants, you can have custom maps. However, I used the latter since I have maps ranging from 1 segment to 20 segments. And I did not like the idea to have a pile of units dangling half on the map and half on the table.

Examples of the basic, hexagons on hexagons.
http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-booPKQbQWbQ/UUkcMlGmXPI/AAAAAAAAAjk/dpMPb3fbAG...

http://www.kjd-imc.org/wp-content/uploads/three-level-hex-map.png

Example of complete hexagons in one segment.
http://www.mathematische-basteleien.de/maghex03.gif

Archimedes42
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Thanks, But...

Thanks for the suggestion, but unfortunately I won't be able to use segments for my map, since each hex must be individual. Also, they have to be quite big (classical Settlers Of Catan size), and the units are individual hex's as well!

Thanks, though.

let-off studios
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Hex Tiles/Cards

I'd say go with what you can afford. That's what it's going to come down to anyway, right?

Ideally hex tiles would be preferred of course, since they're easier to pick up and are much more durable. But they are inevitably going to cost more than cards of the same size.

Look to Print & Play Productions and/or The Game Crafter for pricing info. Make the game you want to play, eh?

RyanRay
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Joined: 03/27/2014
I've purchased Game Crafter

I've purchased Game Crafter hexes before, good quality for a fair price.

Does your game really have 600+ hexes?! Even with a very small 2" hex that would make for a board over 5' square so I assume it's a wargame?

Archimedes42
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Sorry, Should Have Explained

Sorry, I probably should have explained this problem in a little more detail: 'Age Of Man' is a civ building game (not actually much combat.) However, I can see the misunderstanding! Not all of these tiles will be used in the map - in fact a fair amount of them won't even be used in a single play through:

'Age Of Man' is divided up into 8 different eras, with about 70+ tiles composing each era. Not every era will be played in a single play through, but it is essential that I include at least this many eras, and at least this many tiles in each one. Anyways, a little less than half of these tiles will even come out of the box in a single play through, and not all of the tiles that do contribute to the map (some are events, technology, etc...) So don't worry, Ryan Ray, I won't have a 5' board going on here! :)

I have already checked out the Game Crafter, and it looks like it has pretty solid components. (12 hex tiles cost about 6 bucks, whereas 12 hex cards only cost about 4 bucks - this adds up!) I'm not worried about component quality from the Game Crafter, I simply had never heard of hex cards before, and wondered if they had some flaw that discouraged designers from using them. I am definitely going to use hex cards in the prototype, anyways, so I guess that I can just cross the publishing bridge when I get there!

Thanks for all your help.

P.S. I found the hex card template on the Game Crafter, but how do you actually send your hex cards to their base to get printed? Am I missing some sort of button, or something?

RyanRay
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Joined: 03/27/2014
Yeah, their UI isn't the most

Yeah, their UI isn't the most intuitive. Luckily the stuff they produce actually comes out quite nicely (in my experiences).

You have to go to My Games and basically create a game using your custom parts, even if you're not making an entire game with them. It'll give you the option to upload files along the process.

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