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Paper for card making

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Norsehound
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Joined: 12/22/2008

I'm building a prototype game right now for a class requirement (senior project) and need to get my hands on some descent cardstock paper for an inkjet laser printer. Another thread here recommended 10pt, but the examples available on amazon say it "isn't recommended for ink-jet printing".

I'd like to manufacture the cards right from my desktop instead of sending them off to some professional to wait weeks for. Does anyone know where I can get my hands on some descent card-stock (10 pt?) for printing through an ink-jet printer?

SiddGames
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Joined: 08/02/2008
I just use regular 110 pound

I just use regular 110 pound cardstock (which works fine in a straight-through printer, not quite as good in a U-turn type printer) and then sleeve them.

How long is your turn-around time? Artscow has a coupon on 54-card decks right now for $5.77 with free shipping, and the turn-around (for me lately) has been around 3-5 days for printing and 7-10 days for shipment (they come from Hong Kong).

Link here (includes my referral code): http://www.artscow.com/?Ref=551163

Coupon code to be used at checkout: PLAYCARD377 (expires 4/30)

Link to a BGG thread discussing the printing: http://www.boardgamegeek.com/thread/395699

End of Time Games
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Joined: 04/16/2009
Thanks Siddgames for this

Thanks Siddgames for this info! Couldn't have came at a better time. Damn flabit! Why don't we have a "links" section. There are so many great links that come out like this that are so useful to designers. I know the BGDF gods are vary busy but that would be a nice feature to add in the near future.

drewdane
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Joined: 11/28/2008
110 pound cardstock

I have fed reams of 110# cardstock through my U-turn type inkjet printer with no adverse effects. Not one jam, or crease. Your mileage may vary.
110# is the heaviest paper you can find commonly. (available at Walmart, Office Depot, etc.) To get something more stout, you'll have to go to a paper company (and pay substantially more.)

That having been said, I don't think you'd be very happy with cards printed on 110# cardstock. They would still be pretty flimsy, and the color would be prone to running. If you laminated them, or used the card sleeve / junk card trick, you'd be fine. But on their own, I wouldn't recommended it.

tdishman
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Joined: 08/05/2008
If it's not for production, I

If it's not for production, I would recommend using card sleeves for your cards. If you cut your own the cards will most likely not all be the same size, and you might be able to tell the cards apart in the deck.

If you use card sleeves, you can print your cards on regular printer paper and then insert a playing card behind the paper to give the card some stiffness. This is a much cheaper alternative (assuming you're going to be changing and re-printing your cards frequently).

This is what I do for the CCGs that I design, and it works great.

Rick-Holzgrafe
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Joined: 07/22/2008
Try photo paper

If your cards don't need to be printed on both sides, you can get very good results from satin-finish (aka semi-gloss) photo paper. The output looks great, the paper is nearly opaque (unless viewed with strong backlighting), and the cards will shuffle nicely if you are careful to cut them all to the same size.

I've never been able to find double-sided photo paper, so if you need to print both sides of your cards, photo paper won't work.

By the way: it seems clear that you have an inkjet printer, but your initial post was confusing because you claimed to have a laser inkjet printer. It's laser or it's inkjet, but it's not both. Being clear will help you to get better answers more quickly.

SiddGames
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I would add that the Artscow

I would add that the Artscow cards are quite nice, but not as good as the Guild of Blades POD (Print on Demand) cards. Artscow cards have a nice feel to them and the graphic quality is good, but they aren't as stiff and "CCG-like" as GOB cards. But, while they have coupons running with free shipping, their prices are great, and you can do as few or as many decks as you want. If I ever get to the point where I self-publish something (as in, paying customers), I would go to GOB. For everything else (playtest prototypes, just for fun, gifts) I'm happy with Artscow WITH coupons.

Norsehound
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Joined: 12/22/2008
thanks

Ugh. Inkjet printer...

The biggest problem is that my cards are of 'odd dimensions', specifically 4.5x2in which is why I wanted something I could print with and cut to size.

Thanks all.

drewdane
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Joined: 11/28/2008
My solution for odd sized cards.

We have odd-sized cards in 18EZ. For the prettytype I made to show off at conventions (A prettytype is a prototype... but prettier) I printed the cards on 110# cardstock and then covered the entire sheet with clear contact paper before cutting them out. That way the low-rent laminate matches up with the edges perfectly. Only a few cards have printing on both sides, so those were the only ones on which I covered both sides. If I was doing it again, I'd do both sides of all of them. Those cards have a nice feel to them.
You might get better results with peel-and-stick laminating film. I don't think my contact paper cards would hold up to shuffling very well (which is not an issue in 18EZ.)

http://www.michaels.com/art/online/displayProductPage?productNum=fa0618

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