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How do I get an artist

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Admiral Lazarev
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Joined: 08/16/2017

I am a new game designer and I've got the game all ready I just need art for it. I do not know how to get an artist and I need one. What do I do?

Evil ColSanders
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Joined: 12/08/2010
www.deviantart.com If you are

www.deviantart.com

If you are SERIOUS about PAYING MONEY for artwork for your game, I would recommend this place. Go on the forum and put out an ad for a commerical commission (if you plan on selling the game) and I'm not talking about, "Maybe I'll sell it if it gets popular". No. Welcome to sue-town if the artist is notified about that, (and fans of their art can and will). If you just want to make a game for yourself and friends, then there's no prob.

If you have a specific art style in mind, you'll have to spend DAYS looking for that perfect style, cost, and turn-around time for art. You will pay anywhere from 10 to 120 USD for one artwork. More if it's for a commercial commission. I was lucky enough to get a fairly cheap artist there and I STILL spent about $500. Money well spent though, as I get compliments on the artwork all the time.

In short, deviantart.com If you don't care about the style, you can get stuff fast and cheap. Have a certain style in mind. It's going to cost you a lot of time and money. Worth it in the long run.

Here's my game on The Game Crafter. It's going live in 7 days as of this posting. Happy hunting!
https://www.thegamecrafter.com/games/dungeon-brawl5

FrankM
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Joined: 01/27/2017
Is all commercial-use art the same?

First, congrats on going live in seven days!

Second, suppose I'm trying to get some artwork to round out a prototype that I have no intention of self-publishing, but would like to submit to publishers.

My understanding is that publishers would almost certainly replace the artwork anyway, but I think it's be worth $50 or so to kick the rules up a notch from Sterile Word Document to Semi-Professional Rulebook. So this is a commission for commercial-use art, but not for wide distribution. (In the unlikely case the publisher wants to use this exact art, I can always but them in touch with the artist.)

How does something like this affect the pricing?

Evil ColSanders
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Joined: 12/08/2010
Well, if you want some quick,

Well, if you want some quick, throw-away art of which you will 100% remove with other art, just get "private-use" commissions. Which is basically, they draw it for you, but they retain all rights of the work. So if you were to sell it, make t-shirts, posters, etc, you'll get in some legal trouble with them. If you wish to sell the art or include the art in media (i.e. a boardgame) then you have to get a commercial commission (for commercial use). Now, you are contracting them to make art for you of which you will own the rights.

It's like the difference between using fair-use clipart vs buying a shutterstock photo. Pricing varies artist to artist. Some do not do/allow commercial commissions. Some ONLY do them. the price is up to the artist. It's however much they are willing to let their services go for. Sometimes there's no markup. Usually the average I've seen is a $50 markup. If you want to own it and not have legal trouble, do it.

Gabe
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Joined: 09/11/2014
Here's a list of the best

Here's a list of the best articles I'v found about finding artists: http://www.boardgamedesignlab.com/business/#art

But if you're just putting together a prototype, just find stuff on Google images. As long as you're not selling the game, there's no issue.

Admiral Lazarev
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Joined: 08/16/2017
Thanks for the help colonel!

Thanks for the help colonel! Good luck on your game!

Admiral Lazarev
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Joined: 08/16/2017
Sorry Gabe, didn't mean to

Sorry Gabe, didn't mean to leave you out! Thank you too!

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