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Little contest: White hexes game

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coco
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Hi, all!

I'd like to run a little contest here.

The rules:

- Design a game that uses only white hexes (30 to 60 hexes of 3 cm diameter, no extra components, no board).
- 2 to 6 players.
- Post the rules here.
- Dealine is oct-15-2009

Cheers!

Néstor Romeral Andrés
NESTORGAMES

Dralius
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Joined: 07/26/2008
What happens if i win?

What happens if i win?

Willi B
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Hex dimensions

Nestor -

Are the pieces able to be stood on their side? More dimensions = greater possibilities!

coco
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Winning

Hi, David! Good to read you again.

If you win you might get published. ;-)

magic_user
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Darn!

Had one, but it used player pieces.

Must......

Think.....

Harder.....

coco
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Joined: 07/27/2008
side is only 3mm

Willi B wrote:
Nestor -

Are the pieces able to be stood on their side? More dimensions = greater possibilities!

Hi, Willi.

Thank you for asking.

No, the side is only 3mm. So they can't stay on their side.

schtoom
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Can you write/print on the

Can you write/print on the hexes?

coco
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Just white hexes

schtoom wrote:
Can you write/print on the hexes?

No. Just white hexes. That's the challenge.

Néstor

Jpwoo
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What are they made out of?

What are they made out of?

coco
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acrylic

Jpwoo wrote:
What are they made out of?

Laser-cut acrylic. Like the ones in LIMIT, but no printing:

http://nestorgames.com/gameimages/limit_nestorgames.jpg

Néstor

Willi B
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I've got about 4 untested already....

I plan on testing them of course, but wanted to know if you are looking to take 1 entry per person or any other restriction.

Is there anything specifically you are wanting?

Is this to be multiple games from 1 set of pieces that you are marketing or a single game?

Thanks!

Kjev
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Ehrm..

Néstor, I liked the other contests that were posted on the bbg forums, but to me this sounds like a slightly ridiculous contest.. no offence.

So you have 30-60 hexes, with no way to distinguish one hex from another (no printing), so they have to be communal. They can't stand on a side and no other components (including a board) can be used, so even less distinguishing between players.. I think that the limitations on this 'contest' are a little bit too hard, so I was wondering: do you already have some sort of concept yourself, one that you are pleased with?

But still my/our 2 cents: the best thing we could come up with was that you have to eat all 60 hexes and the person that lives wins..

coco
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specifically

Hi, Willi B.

Willi B wrote:
I plan on testing them of course, but wanted to know if you are looking to take 1 entry per person or any other restriction.

You can submit as many games as you wish.

Quote:

Is there anything specifically you are wanting?

Yes. I'd like to know if it's possible to design a good game usign just 1 component (white hexes in this case). If it is good enough, I'd like to pulbish it.

Quote:

Is this to be multiple games from 1 set of pieces that you are marketing or a single game?
Thanks!

I'm looking for 1 single game. However, if it finally gets published, authors may add rules for other games using the same set if they wish. Like in Icehouse.

Néstor

coco
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concept

Kjev wrote:
Néstor, I liked the other contests that were posted on the bbg forums, but to me this sounds like a slightly ridiculous contest.. no offence.

So you have 30-60 hexes, with no way to distinguish one hex from another (no printing), so they have to be communal. They can't stand on a side and no other components (including a board) can be used, so even less distinguishing between players.. I think that the limitations on this 'contest' are a little bit too hard, so I was wondering: do you already have some sort of concept yourself, one that you are pleased with?

But still my/our 2 cents: the best thing we could come up with was that you have to eat all 60 hexes and the person that lives wins..

Well. I'm taking this very seriously.

And no, I don't have any concept.

Néstor

InvisibleJon
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Running tally score keeping...

May we also use pencil and paper? That's kind of essential if you're making a game that has a running score tally.

(Unless you use the hexes for score keeping too... Hmmm...)

schtoom
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Hex game entry

My game entry is sort of a throwback to the paper football game I'm sure a lot of you are familiar with.

Players: 2

Setup:
Players much be sitting in a manner that allows them to face each other. Each player takes a hex piece and places forward and to his/her right side. Rotate the two pieces such that they have their "points" facing each other. This is the "line" for play.

Play:
The remaining hexes are split evenly between the two players. Oldest player goes first. The players take turns flicking/sliding the pieces across the playing surface in an effort to get the most hex pieces on the opposing players side of the line. You may flick/slide a piece in such a manner that it hits another piece. If a player flicks a piece off of the playing surface that piece is placed on that player's side out of play (this also applies to pieces that ricochet off of the playing surface, meaning a player could possibly have to take ownership of several pieces for a bad shot). All hexes that are fired, if they cross the "line", must pass in between the two pieces designated at the beginning of the game. If a player hits one of these 2 pieces, they immediately lose and the game is over. This counts even for hex pieces that may ricochet into the 2 marker pieces. Additionally pieces are not allowed to be airborne unless it is a result of coming into contact with another piece; offending pieces are returned to their launcher's side, out of play to be counted at the end of the game.

Winning Parameters:
The winner is determined by who has the fewest pieces on their side of the line. Any pieces that were placed out of play on your side count as points towards your total. If there is a question about whose side of the line a piece is on, leaning over and eyeballing the "line" can determine which side of the line most of the piece is on and thus who it goes to. As previously mentioned, if a player causes any piece to touch one of the predetermined "line" markers, that player immediately loses the game.

As an added, totally nonsensical rule, each player must make a noise like an animal whenever they fire a piece. The same animal noise can not be used twice. Failure to do so means you have to reclaim the piece fired and put it on your side, out of play, to be counted towards your total at the end of the game.

coco
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running score tally

InvisibleJon wrote:
May we also use pencil and paper? That's kind of essential if you're making a game that has a running score tally.

(Unless you use the hexes for score keeping too... Hmmm...)

Hmmm. Ok. But it won't be included in the game.

Oh! And don't make a score track!

Néstor

coco
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"2 to 6" players

schtoom wrote:
My game entry is sort of a throwback to the paper football game I'm sure a lot of you are familiar with.

Thank you for your game.

But the rules of the contest say "2 to 6" players. ;-)

Néstor

InvisibleJon
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Three games: "Hex Hubs" "Stacks-a-gons" and "Hexal"

Obviously (or not) I haven't played any of these yet. I don't really have access to the requisite hexagonal tiles. Anyway, here they are:

*********
Hex Hubs
*********
Setup:
Start with a a 1x6 line of tiles and a stock pile.
Pick a player to go first.

Play:
Take turns taking a tile from the stock pile and flicking it into the arena. The starting point of your flick may not be closer to any tile in play than the length of the carrying case.
If a tile touches three or more other tiles, it counts as a “hub”.
If there is a hub after you flick, move it and all tiles it touches to your score pile. If one or more hubs remain, repeat this process.
When no hubs remain, play passes to the next player.

Ending the Game and Winning:
Play until the stock pile runs out.
Count the tiles in your score pile. The player with the most points wins.

************
Stacks-a-gons
************
Setup:
Start with a big hexagon made of 19 tiles.
Put the remaining tiles in a stock pile in easy reach of all players.
Pick a player to go first.

Play:
Take a hex from the stock pile and place it so it overlaps at least two hexes.
Take one hex from the stock pile and put it in your score pile for every hex you overlapped.
You may not deliberately move the center of the tiles in play. If the weight of the tile you place causes any tile under it to pivot up, away from the table, that's okay.
You may try to pass your turn. To do so, take a tile from the stock pile and hide it in one of your hands. Let the other player pick a hand. If that player picks the hand with the tile, you must play that tile. Otherwise, put it back.
After you play a tile (and score, if appropriate) or successfully pass your turn, play passes to the next player.

Ending the Game and Winning:
If all players pass consecutively, or if it is impossible to play, the game ends.
Count the tiles in your score pile. The player with the most points wins.

******
Hexal
******
Setup:
Start with a big hexagon made of six tiles (empty center).
Put the remaining tiles in a stock pile in easy reach of all players.
Draw three different five-hex patterns on a piece of paper and pass them to the player to your right. Examine the patterns you’ve been given. You’re trying to build these patterns. You may keep your pattern sheet hidden once you receive it.
Pick a player to go first.

Play:
Take turns playing tiles from the stock pile to the play area. If you lay one of your patterns, point it out, show it on your pattern sheet, and move three of its tiles to your score pile. If you make multiple patterns at once, lift and score them one at a time. If lifting tiles for scoring disrupts an un-scored pattern, do not score the disrupted pattern.
After you play a tile (and score, if appropriate), play passes to the next player.

Ending the Game and Winning:
Play until the stock pile runs out.
Count the tiles in your score pile. The player with the most points wins.

schtoom
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Hex game submission

Okay, I redesigned it to handle 2-6 players. :)

Players: 2-6

Setup:
Players must be sitting in a geometric pattern (2 players sit across from each other, 3 players in a triangle, etc). Each player takes a hex piece and places forward and to his/her right side. Rotate the pieces such that they have their "points" facing each other. This is the "line" for play.

Play:
The remaining hexes are split evenly between the players. Oldest player goes first. The players take turns flicking/sliding the pieces across the playing surface in an effort to get the most hex pieces on the opposing players' side of the line. You may flick/slide a piece in such a manner that it hits another piece. If a player flicks a piece off of the playing surface that piece is placed on that player's side out of play (this also applies to pieces that ricochet off of the playing surface, meaning a player could possibly have to take ownership of several pieces for a bad shot). All hexes that are fired, if they cross a "line", must pass in between the two pieces designated at the beginning of the game that form that line. If a player hits one of the line markers placed at the beginning of the game, they immediately lose and out of the game. This counts even for hex pieces that may ricochet into the marker pieces. Additionally pieces are not allowed to be airborne unless it is a result of coming into contact with another piece; offending pieces are returned to their launcher's side, out of play to be counted at the end of the game.

Winning Parameters:
The winner is determined by who has the fewest pieces on their side of the line. Any pieces that were placed out of play on your side count as points towards your total. In the case of games with 3 or more players, the pieces in the empty center section of the geometric pattern are totaled up and added to each players score. If there is a question about whose side of the line a piece is on, leaning over and eyeballing the "line" can determine which side of the line most of the piece is on and thus who it goes to. As previously mentioned, if a player causes any piece to touch one of the predetermined "line" markers, that player immediately is out of the game.

As an added, totally nonsensical rule, each player must make a noise like an animal whenever they fire a piece. The same animal noise can not be used twice. Failure to do so means you have to reclaim the piece fired and put it on your side, out of play, to be counted towards your total at the end of the game.

schtoom
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I'm not familiar with the

I'm not familiar with the material that is being used for the hexes. Is it dry marker/eraser friendly stuff? I have another idea I'd like to submit as well if that is the case.

Willi B
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Nestor -

Once you allow pencil and paper, I think you are changing the challenge.

If that is the case, please say now what all is allowed. If we are adding dry erase marker possibilities that can obviously change everything as well.

Pure hexes or no?

Willi B
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sliding

how well do these things slide?

coco
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No markers

schtoom wrote:
I'm not familiar with the material that is being used for the hexes. Is it dry marker/eraser friendly stuff? I have another idea I'd like to submit as well if that is the case.

No markers. Just white hexes.

Néstor

coco
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No pencil and paper

Willi B wrote:
Once you allow pencil and paper, I think you are changing the challenge.

If that is the case, please say now what all is allowed. If we are adding dry erase marker possibilities that can obviously change everything as well.

Pure hexes or no?

You're right.

No pencil and paper. Sorry.

Néstor

coco
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slide

Willi B wrote:
how well do these things slide?

Very well. Much better than cardboard, for example. Almost like ice.

Néstor

Katherine
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Joined: 07/24/2008
would anyone buy a game that

would anyone buy a game that consists of white hexes and nothing else? as a shopper I would assume that the board had to be bought separately and ignore them.

schtoom
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Awesome packaging?

Awesome packaging?

addaon
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My entry

Here's my attempt:

"ROSENCRANTZ AND GUILDENSTERN MUST DIE"
Designed by addaon - 9/25/2009

RULES

The game is played with a single hexagon, white on both sides (hereafter THE GAME PIECE). THE GAME PIECE represents a single disc, white on both sides.

The game is for two through six players. Players are referred to in the following rules by their roles. The first player is THE ROSENCRANTZ. The second player is THE GUILDENSTERN. The third through sixth players (optional) are THE OTHER PLAYERS.

1. Round Sequence
1a. THE GUILDENSTERN takes hold of THE GAME PIECE.
1b. THE GUILDENSTERN throws THE GAME PIECE into the air.
1c. While THE GAME PIECE is in the air, THE ROSENCRANTZ says one of
"white" or "black.
1d. If present, THE OTHER PLAYERS collaboratively let THE GAME PIECE
fall to the ground. Otherwise, it falls unhindered.
1e. A point is assigned to the winner of the round as follows:
1e(i). If THE ROSENCRANTZ said "white" and THE GAME PIECE landed
with a white side up, THE ROSENCRANTZ is awarded a point.
1e(ii). If THE ROSENCRANTZ said "black" and THE GAME PIECE landed
with a black side up, THE ROSENCRANTZ is awarded a point.
1e(iii). If neither of the above cases apply, THE GUILDENSTERN is
awarded a point.
1f. The round sequence repeats from 1a unless the game ends.

2. Ending the Game
2a. Rounds repeat until one of these conditions hold:
2a(i). THE GAME PIECE lands with a black side up.
2a(ii). The players are sued by the estate of Tom Stoppard.
2b. If the game terminated before one of the above conditions is met,
all players lose.

The winner is the player with the most points when the game terminates.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

QUESTION: Shouldn't the roles be the other way around?
ANSWER: Maybe.

QUESTION: If the hexagon represents a disc, why not just play with a disc?
ANSWER: Branding. The hexagon is a mnemonic device; each side represents one word of the game title. This also serves to distinguish the game from the similar "THE FLY GODS MUST BE CRAZY ALIENS", which is played with an octagon.

QUESTION: Is rule 2b necessary?
ANSWER: Unlike in the prequel to "ROSENCRANTZ AND GUILDENSTERN MUST DIE", where 2b was considered an optional rule, 2b is now considered mandatory. See also the following question.

QUESTION: Isn't an optimal strategy in this game trivial?
ANSWER: No. Unlike simple games like tic-tac-toe where the only winning move is known, "ROSENCRANTZ AND GUILDENSTERN MUST DIE" has rule 2b, which prevents such a strategy. See also the previous question.

FOLLOWUP CHALLENGE

As "ROSENCRANTZ AND GUILDENSTERN MUST DIE" demonstrates that a game can be made using a single white hexagon, go one step further; design one with zero white hexagons. To make it interesting, we require that the game must be specific to the hexagon. That is, it must be played without a hexagon, and no other shape; it cannot be played without an octagon or a square.

Steve
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Joined: 07/29/2008
GAME PROPOSAL - Stepdown

OBJECTIVE - 2 or more players (preferably 2, see rule variants for more players) attempt to create a series of stacked hexes, each stack one less then the prior stack connected to it. The first person to create a situation where a player can start at a stack of 5 hexes & reach the ground following other connected hex stacks wins the game (5-4-3-2-1-0).

PIECES - White hexes (the more, the merrier). For 2 players, 31 should be more then sufficient.

SET-UP - Each player gets 15 hexes at the start of the game. 1 hex is placed in the "center" of the playing area. The playing area should be sufficiently large enough so that players do not feel inhibited by their choice of moves.

CONCEPTS - A "hex stack" is a stack of playing pieces, one playing piece resting neatly on top of the other. A "connected piece" is a series of three pieces that are connected either from the top / bottom planes and/or on a piece's sides. This piece will stay "connected" to each other as though magically glued together until after it has rested onto the game area, where some of it's pieces may be removed by rules later explained. A "stepdown" is a series of hex stacks, each connected hex stack having 1 less hex piece then the previous one. Think of it as a series of steps on a staircase.

RULES - Players alternate turns & there is no deviation from this rule.

A player creates a connected piece from their pile of pieces & places it onto the game area.

If the player, upon executing their turn, creates a higher stepdown (for example, if on the previous turn the stepdown was from a 1-hex stack to the ground level & the player then creates a 2-hex stack connected by a 1-hex stack connected to the ground level) then in the previous turn, the turn ends. If the player creates such a stepdown that it starts at a 5-hex stack & descends to the ground level, then that player wins the game & the game is over.

Whenever a player places a connected piece onto the game area & can not create a stepdown, the opponent must take advantage. The opponent MUST remove one hex piece from the top of any stack (including single hex pieces resting on the ground level) & place it in their pile before playing their connected piece on the game area.

If the opponent can remove a hex piece & create a stepdown starting with a 5-hex stack in the process, then the opponent wins & needs not place a connected piece onto the game area.

If a player does not have 3 or more pieces to create a connected piece, the player must then take a hex piece from the game area. If, upon removing that hex piece from the game area, the player wins, then the player's turn ends. Otherwise, the player's turn ends & the opponent is then allowed to execute their move.

Players are not allowed to create "islands," either through the process of placing down a connected piece or removing a piece from the game area.

RULE VARIANTS - For more players, a larger goal is in order. For 3-4 players, a stepdown starting with a 6-hex stack is the objective. For 5-6 players, a stepdown starting with a 7-stack is the objective. Also, with more players, there will be more pieces in play. 3 players = 20 pieces each. 4 players = 15 pieces each. 5 = 12 pieces. 6 = 10 pieces.

If, upon more extensive playtesting, there are design concerns that arise, this proposal may be amended or removed as appropriate. Constructive criticism concerning this proposal is encouraged. Thank you.

coco
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Joined: 07/27/2008
packaging

schtoom wrote:
Awesome packaging?

Yes. Like the one of LIMIT.

Néstor

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