Skip to Content

What do I do with my design?

14 replies [Last post]
Ristora
Ristora's picture
Offline
Joined: 11/05/2013

Hi everyone!

I've been working on my own and friend's game designs for about 2 years now. I've got one game on the go at the moment, and another one I just finished.

This is probably going to sound dramatic, but if I've created a game that I think is extremely good and others have told me is extremely good, how can I get it out there for blind play testing while at the same time ensuring that the idea won't get ripped off? How do I make a link between me and the game that is undeniable?

Any feedback will be very appreciated!

X3M
X3M's picture
Offline
Joined: 10/28/2013
A Patent?

Patenting your game?
http://www.ipwatchdog.com/2011/12/22/patenting-board-games-101/

Although, find other site's on this as well. Make a study out of it.
I am planning to make a study out of it.

I don't know how others here think about this.

Ristora
Ristora's picture
Offline
Joined: 11/05/2013
Thanks X3M, but a legal

Thanks X3M, but a legal patent will likely not help me. First off, I can't afford to do it. Second, from what I understand, there are only certain kinds of elements you can patent when it comes to game design. For example, Wizards of the Coast tried to patent 'tapping' and if I recall correctly they failed in one way or another.

I'm just looking for a way to associate my design *with* me, not so that I have legal recourse, but so that if anyone were to duplicate the idea or keep the exact mechanics and change the theme, I could point to X and say "This was my idea first".

Maybe I'm over thinking it/being paranoid.

Corsaire
Corsaire's picture
Offline
Joined: 06/27/2013
Use your full name and post

Use your full name and post the instructions on BGG with your name on the copyright. You could include some paragraph or so of thanks/background that discusses when you started working on it and the folk(s) that helped.

X3M
X3M's picture
Offline
Joined: 10/28/2013
Well, I can't afford it

Well, I can't afford it either.

That's why I am planning to do a second test run with more people. Not just 1 guy.
And register them all.

If anyone copies the idea. The others are witnesses that it is my game.
But then again. The chance of it happening is slim when you test with friends and family.

Ristora
Ristora's picture
Offline
Joined: 11/05/2013
BGG

Thanks Corasire, I didn't consider that as an option!

Once I do that, you think it would be 'safe' (haha) to distribute the card designs for select play testers on BGDF?

EDIT: I've submitted the game information on BGG. Does anyone have an idea the turn around time on that?

EDIT 2: Just found this interesting post on BGG regarding patents, copyrights, and trademarks: http://www.boardgamegeek.com/thread/493249/mythbusting-game-design-and-c...

anonymousmagic
Offline
Joined: 11/06/2013
Don't waste your time on

Don't waste your time on copyrighting, trademarking or patenting. It's expensive and if you plan on shopping it around to game publishers, it's a bad idea because that's something they'd handle for you. Just post about it, put it out there. The more people who know you created it, the more people will be able to back you up if you get ripped off.

However, you should look at a video from the Dice Tower Review on Youtube about their Top Ten Tips for game designers. The chance you get your idea ripped off is really less likely than you think. Writers worry about it too, but truth is, ideas are a dime a dozen. What matters is the execution.

Ristora
Ristora's picture
Offline
Joined: 11/05/2013
Thanks anonymousmagic :)

Thanks anonymousmagic :)

crenshal
crenshal's picture
Offline
Joined: 09/30/2013
Local Comic Shops and Gamers

I have tried to send various games out to be blind tested by friends and friends of friends and I run into the same problems every time. The game is never played, the feedback is poor at best and I never end up getting the game back or the game never gets circulated. I should say, I don't expect to get copies of the game back or have them circulated like currency, but I consider it rude to get something for free with the intention to play it and comment and turn around and not play or return or not at least to forward the game to a friend/family member to play the game instead. I am very clear that the purpose of me spending time and money to get a person a game is to have them play it.....anyways.

My new strategy is to go to local comic stores and ask to have a table for game nights. I can control how many copies of the game are being played, I can get feedback just from watching people play the game, I can get instant feedback from the people who play the game. The next step is when a game night player shows some level of interest I ask them if they would like to take a copy home or to a friends and have them test it blind. Because the people I give copies to have seen my face and shaken my hand, I gain a comfort level that they will do with the game what they say they will do and not try to take advantage of me and the game. The hope is that they will start telling their extended network of local, non-local and online friends they have played this awesome game and everyone should try it out. Yes, this is an ideal situation but I think I have given up on trying to force my games on people and will use the organic growth model from now on. As interest grows, I can either send out copies or send people to the game on TGC. To be honest, I have not gone that far in the strategy, but I have only taken this route for 6 weeks now and I am happy with early "returns".

deadcatdreaming
deadcatdreaming's picture
Offline
Joined: 10/08/2013
Excellent Idea

Thanks Crenshal, I really like this idea of maintaing a face to face connection and will hopefully adopt it in the near future. Thanks for sharing.

Ristora
Ristora's picture
Offline
Joined: 11/05/2013
Thanks for the reply

Thanks for the reply crenshal. My plan right now is to canvas BGG and BGDF for play testers. I figure if people volunteer to playtest, there is a good chance they will. I suspect a problem with getting friends of friend to do it is that they are more likely to say they will even if they really don't want to.

questccg
questccg's picture
Offline
Joined: 04/16/2011
TRUTH

anonymousmagic wrote:
The chance you get your idea ripped off is really less likely than you think. Writers worry about it too, but truth is, ideas are a dime a dozen. What matters is the execution.

TRUTH!

I couldn't say it BETTER than that!

perfectimperfection
Offline
Joined: 11/10/2013
Game shops

I have to say, I'm with the shop idea. I am in super-early design phases with my game right now, but I was curious how to move forward. I went to my local game shop and spoke to them. They have a board game night on Wednesdays where about 100 people turn up. The manager said I should come along one Wednesday and say hello and ask the organisers (who are not shop staff) to address the whole group. Then say that I will be coming back in x weeks with a game looking for play testers - they normally book up what they're going to play in advance, so this kind of notice is necessary - and then turn up and hopefully get a table or two interested in playing. That way you can also explain the rules to a bunch of people all at once. Hope that's helpful.

Sabash
Offline
Joined: 10/21/2013
If you're near a major city,

If you're near a major city, check your area for boardgame design groups. I know there is at least one in Boston, for example, where they organize blind playtest nights. There's one tonight, for example.

Kroz1776
Offline
Joined: 10/09/2013
I.E.

What better example that ideas are a dime a dozen when you see the success Twilight achieved, and then a year or two later you see the bookshelves FILLED with vampire love stories. One was more than enough.

Syndicate content


forum | by Dr. Radut