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When to get Artwork

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Roll For Surprise
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Joined: 08/16/2012

Hi all,

I have a game Planet 313, that will be put on kickstarter. I am well into the playtesting phase and feedback is starting to get to the point of "ready to publish".. I have borrowed artwork from google images on my prototype and box.

Since I am not sure of the kickstarter success, I would like to hear other folks approach to...

1. when they buy artwork,
2. how much do they buy before Kickstart,
3. and how much after success??

This would greatly help me attack my first Kickstarter!

Thanks

Emil Rudvi
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Joined: 02/13/2014
Start early =)

I recommend that you use free art. Art takes time to make so start early =)I Think that if you got pretty good artwork it becomes easier succeed during the Kickstarter Campaign. Take a look at other Projects it might help =)

Good luck with the game!

Best regards
Emil Rudvi

Roll For Surprise
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Thanks

Emil,

Thank you for the reply. How do you go about getting "free" artwork. I have been using "Borrowed" art off of Google Images. However, these are not good for a final product to sell sense i don't have any IP or copywrite rights to them.

If there is a way to get free artwork I would love to find out!

thanks,

John

McTeddy
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Joined: 11/19/2012
While I haven't personally

While I haven't personally run a kickstarter, I'll tell you what I've learned from other people's campaigns.

DON'T SKIMP ON THE KICKSTARTER ART! Don't use clip art, temp art, or anything else that doesn't resemble the final product. You need this page to look good.
More than a few people buy games on the look alone.

My advice is to start researching artists that you want to work with right now. Check out their prices, see if they'd cut a deal per piece for doing the full project after the kickstarter.
Also, find out how long it will take for both the full project and a handful of "Kickstarter" pieces. This will tell you how long to start in advance.

Order JUST enough artwork to fill your kickstarter page. This might be a few example cards and a few good images of your setting. Maybe even the boxart for now.
Mention that the artist who did the samples will be doing the game art so that the player's can expect more of the same.

If the kickstarter fails, you don't want to lose too much on art costs. Make the page look great... but don't spend more than you need to yet.

When the Kickstarter succeeds, get the rest of the artwork. You'll need it before you ship and the kickstarter money will make things a bit more affordable.

questccg
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Joined: 04/16/2011
My opinion

Roll For Surprise wrote:
I have borrowed artwork from google images on my prototype and box.

I would omit using "borrowed" artwork and just find *placeholder* artwork. Like if your games is about space, find a nice NASA space picture and use that on all your cards.

Roll For Surprise wrote:
Since I am not sure of the kickstarter success, I would like to hear other folks approach to...

1. when they buy artwork,
2. how much do they buy before Kickstart,
3. and how much after success??

This would greatly help me attack my first Kickstarter!

Typically your budget for artwork should be between $500-$1,000. Obviously the more artwork you have for your Kickstarter, the better that is.

If you are dealing with cards, my suggestion is to have 3 to 5 cards done. Next go for the money art - get a box cover done. This should be your image used on the Kickstarter page. You want something nice.

You should also try to negotiate a good rate for all your artwork, preferably from one artist. Consider the $500-$1,000 an advance for Kickstarter artwork. You can also have your artist design banners to divide your Kickstarter page sections.

So if you have 100 cards in your game, have something like 5 done and deduct them from the 100... So you would have 95 remaining to do.

Also tell the artist that the artwork is for a Kickstarter. This way the artist might spend a little more time on the artwork knowing that the goal would be to help fund the remainder of the artwork...

Roll For Surprise
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Thanks

Thanks McTeddy and Quest, these suggestions are great. I am speaking with an artist this week and I am going to follow your advice about breaking into 2 phases.

I really liked the Idea about having the artist do bannars for the kickstart too. Thanks so much

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