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Any interest in video interviews with publishers and designers?

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Gabe
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Earlier today, I was trying to think of ways that I could contribute more to the hobby, but I ran into some roadblocks.

1. I can't do game reviews because I live in Honduras where it's pretty much impossible to get new games. My address is literally the yellow house with the big, grey truck parked out front. When a furniture store has to make deliveries, they hand you a blank piece of paper and say "please draw a map," haha. It's not exactly a place CoolStuff ships to.

2. I don't feel confident about blogging about board games as I don't think I have anything new or interesting to contribute at this time. Plus, I spend most of my day writing and don't want to add more to it.

But I just had an idea that I wanted to get your feedback on to see if it would be worth pursuing.

What if I started doing video interviews with publishers, successful kickstarters, and designers?

Would anyone be interested in that?

I've found lots of podcasts and written interviews but hardly any video interviews. Personally, I don't have much time/opportunity to listen to podcasts and I'm not a fan of reading written interviews. I much prefer to watch a video. But are there any other people with the same feelings?

I'd really like to do a series with publishers that discusses what they're looking for in a game and how to approach them with an idea. I think a lot of us here could benefit from that information.

Thanks for any and all feedback.

The Professor
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Interesting premise

Gabe,

I personally believe there's a ready audience for that content, but it must be, to a greater or lesser degree, mutually beneficial to both sides. The content creator has to have an audience wide enough to be of interest to the publisher and the publisher has to be an interesting candidate to interview to broaden the audience.

Joe

jonathanflike
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Hey Gabe

I would definitely be interested in interviews with designers that had successful Kickstarters or even failed ones and how they were able to turn it around with a second go at it. I think it would encourage more people to put themselves our there, and provide helpful information.

Gabe
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Joe, You make a really good

Joe,

You make a really good point. I see two main benefits for a publisher.

1. An opportunity to promote their company/brand and their games. Similar to how Tom Vasel handled things when he did board game university.

2. People would be more aware of how to approach the publisher which would hopefully cut down on people wasting their time and could also increase the chance of people bringing forth an idea that they actually want to publish.

For instance, if I have a political game and I find out that Z-Man doesn't publish political games, I'm not going to waste their time pitching them the idea.

To get started, I would definitely need a few people to take a chance and be interviewed knowing the audience would initially be small.

Gabe
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Gabe
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*** Double Post ***

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Gabe
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Johnathan

First of all, I'm not sure why it posted the same comment so many times, but anyway.

Yes, I completely agree that interviews with Kickstarter victors and failures could be most insightful. (Maybe I can talk Joe into an interview after today.)

Plus, people love talking about their triumphs and I bet others would want to share the reasons for their failures to help others not make the same mistakes.

The Professor
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The Industry is Changing

Gabe,

You're absolutely right...knowing your audience, ala your Z-Man Games example, speaks to a portion of the issue. Not only do most designers not know necessarily what a publishing company will or will not publish, but moreover, even how to approach them. Over the past few years, especially with the advent of Kickstarter, it's easier, more cost effective, and timely for individuals to simply incorporate and publish under their own name. Take but a few names with whom I'm directly or indirectly connected: Mike and Stan Strickland's Outer Limit Games for TAU CETI, Randy Rathert's Brown Eyed Girl LLC for The King's Abbey, and of course Jamey Stegmaier and Alan Stone's Stonemaier Games for Viticulture, Euphoria, and Scythe.

Publishing houses have been notorious over the years for holding onto projects which often never see the light of day, which has moved innovative designers to publish their own games. Wingo and other major production houses have facilitated this move away from the old structure to this new, more nimble, environment.

As to interviews, I can certainly reach out to Mike Strickland if you want a first-hand account from someone who launched one KS and when it didn't successfully fund, he addressed the issues, relaunched and joined the leagues of wildly successful projects, having funded at over $100K and more importantly drew more than 1,500 Backers to his game.

Cheers,
Joe

Gabe
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Joe, I think you're

Joe,

I think you're completely on point. Kickstarter changed everything and really leveled the playing field--much like Amazon completely changed the face of book publishing.

And while that definitely comes with both pros and cons, it's been great to see some projects brought to life that we probably would have never seen otherwise.

If you would reach out to Mike on my behalf, I would really appreciate it. I'm looking into what all I need to be able to do this and it look good, but I should be ready to record by next week. And if he'd be willing to be the first, it'll probably help me find more people to interview. (There's a pretty good pool of people here at bgdf that might be willing as well.)

Mike has a really unique perspective as he can speak to both failing and succeeding on Kickstarter, and I bet he has some really interesting insights for both sides of things. I was just looking at both the original and second campaigns, and the improvements are obvious. The game looked good before, but then you guys stepped it up to a whole different level. And the result was 100k+.

Thanks!

Gabe

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