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Accepting Game Submissions

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GiggleboxGames
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Gigglebox Games(SM) is preparing to launch a different type of independent game distribution for self-publishers. Rather than compete in the hobby game market, our target audience is the general public and new players unfamiliar with independent games. Independent distributors service a wide variety of stores including gift shops. This creates opportunities to be featured in stores that do not typically offer games. Sales consultants expand the potential for face-to-face purchases after demonstrating the games. Examples include hosting game parties and icebreakers at meetings. Because NO aspect of distribution is multi-level marketing, consultants receive profit margins similar to stores and are motivated to promote the game line.

March 1st, we began accepting game submissions from self-publishers as well as individuals desiring to become self-publishers. From 12 to 20 selected candidates will be offered distribution contracts upon mutual agreement. Although a few important requirements exist, the contracts are non-exclusive. Separate from Gigglebox Games(SM), self-publishers may utilize other forms of distribution provided online discounting does not occur. Independent distributors and sales consultants do not promote products that are discounted online. In-store and direct sales discounts are permitted.

Self-publishers are paid the mutually-agreed wholesale price plus reasonable shipping without paying fees of any kind. Gigglebox Games(SM) endorses the games, coordinates distribution and receives a small fee for processing sales transactions. Self-publishers are responsible for timely production and prompt shipping. Print-On-Demand services are great as intended but cost and shipping delay make alternatives necessary for this type of distribution. Self-publishers must be willing to coordinate production. For those selected who desire to become self-publishers, there is much advice that we can offer in regards to utilizing local printers to keep cost low. Printers often decline game projects because there are misconceptions about complexity. Alternate methods can reduce cost without compromising quality, also making smaller runs possible. Common components are available through importers at great prices. Our suggestions and advice may be helpful if problems are encountered.

Establishing a diverse game line is our first objective. Self-publishers retain all intellectual property rights as well as their personal branding. Our game line will remain small to give each game the attention that it deserves. The sales force will expect availability. Only games with long-term potential will be selected. As games become popular, gifting and other forms of volume sales increase. Our target audience spans all age groups as well as several demographic categories. Game selection will align with specific marketing objectives. Complex and long-playing games are less desirable. Themes in which the average person would recognize are attractive. In general, games with mass public appeal are optimal. There is no commitment or obligation to submit games. If you are a small publisher, self-publisher or desire to become one, we welcome your submissions. Feel free to ask questions.

Website
http://www.giggleboxgames.com/

Game Submission Form
http://www.giggleboxgames.com/submitgame.asp

Game Directory Submission Form (Free Service for Designers and Self-Publishers)
http://www.giggleboxgames.com/gamedirectorysubmission.asp

Willi B
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Joined: 07/28/2008
So...

Your only true offering to a publisher is your sales force. Without particulars on that (number of sales people and their respective, individual years of experience), I cannot see even thinking of working with your company.

MondaysHero
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Joined: 07/08/2011
Hold on now...

A better way of wording this, (as well as non-offensive, and much more diplomatic) would simply be:

Gigglebox, I have a couple of questions in regards to your sales team-
How many sales people are on your work force? What is their individual years of experience?
Thank you.
Monday's Hero

raiderrobert
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Joined: 03/05/2012
Mary Kay of Board Games?

It sounds like they're going a sort of Mary-Kay or Pampered-Chef approach here. So I'd expect their individual sales people to be inexperienced board gaming enthusiasts, as opposed to the tradition full-time sales professional. An interesting approach. I expect it to be useful for large group games or at least 4+ player games in order for each sales 'party' to be most efficient and engaging. So I'm thinking Apples to Apples or Blurt type games would be the most interesting to them.

Willi B
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Joined: 07/28/2008
MondaysHero wrote:A better

MondaysHero wrote:
A better way of wording this, (as well as non-offensive, and much more diplomatic) would simply be:

Gigglebox, I have a couple of questions in regards to your sales team-
How many sales people are on your work force? What is their individual years of experience?
Thank you.
Monday's Hero

It may be... but I really have problems with people that do nothing but facilitate making money from the doers especially when all the risk remains with the game designers.

Simply Fun already does the party model (Mary Kay style), so unless the sales force already has experience, they only differentiate from Simply Fun in that Simply Fun actually takes the risk and publishes the games which this company does not seem to do.

Unless I am misreading their post.

GiggleboxGames
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Joined: 03/04/2012
Legitimate Concerns

I’m glad to directly answer all questions. Nothing mentioned is offensive. These are legitimate concerns. This is a new venture. A sales force is not currently in place awaiting independent games. Phase 1 establishes the game line followed by Phase 2, developing the distribution network. Reversing this sequence isn’t possible. Distributor commitments require tangibles.

Although a new venture in regards to independent games, our business model is common in other industries. Enhancements have been included, tailored to independent games and specific marketing objectives. Personally, I have 25 years of experience. The first 14 years were working for large corporations. International Paper is one example. For 11 years and currently, I am the managing partner of a consulting and development firm. On several occasions, I have implemented projects for companies in which I was previously employed. Business is about building relationships. Understandably, this venture is an unknown quantity to this community.

The core elements of Gigglebox Games(SM) are structured similar to a client in another industry processing approximately $350,000 per month in sales. Having recently celebrated their first anniversary and now branching into other countries, they are experiencing tremendous growth. Half of our business day is devoted to assisting this one client. All other clients combined consume the remainder. At the moment, my evenings and weekends are dedicated to Gigglebox. Our goals are realistic. This is very much a long-term commitment. We have already received several submissions.

One misconception may be that Gigglebox is a general resource for all self-publishers. I wish this were possible. Because our target audience is the general public, the game line must be and remain limited. Principles of marketing apply. The objective is for players to become intimately familiar with the entire line, returning to purchase other games and eventually desiring multiple copies for gifting. Too many options dilute focus. Designer bios are especially important. Similar to book authors, players will relate to the faces behind the games. Many self-publishers and hobby publishers already do this well. For those who watch Food Network, the chefs have become stars. There are many marketing principles that are frequently and inexplicably neglected.

Independent games designed for hobby followers should pursue hobby market distribution channels. Any other approach would be inappropriate and ineffective. The hobby market is highly competitive. There are thousands of games and numerous niches. Hobby community expertise would be imperative. We are seeking great independent games that are appealing to the general public. Submission information is confidential. I can say in general, excellent games do exist but haven’t found their audience. Some are on store shelves experiencing dismal sales because hobby distribution does not reach their optimal audience. Those available online are often discounted. When cost is high, profit is nominal. Designers even sell at a loss in hopes of gaining popularity over time. By signing with us when we extend offers in April, our mission is to transform prior disappointments into positive realities starting mid-year.

Game selection will be strategically diverse to cover a full range of demographics and marketing objectives. Game submission is merely a declaration of interest without commitment or obligation. A decision not to participate is certainly a personal choice. Receiving a licensing agreement from a large publisher would be far superior in comparison. Four generalized groups define ages: child, teen, hipster (20 to 39), and adult. Of course, some games cross two or more age groups. Not every young adult can be categorized as a hipster. Sex is a factor in addition to personality type. Selection complexity exceeds the evaluation of each game individually. Once individually determined solid and desirable, the game line objectives must align well. Tough decisions will be necessary should multiple games ranked as desirable fall into the same demographic objective.

These distributors frequent Market in Dallas and attend general business tradeshows. Toys and novelties are common. In regards to games, imported knock-offs and gimmicks tend to default due to limited availability of better options. Not barring exceptions, inferior game lines have been attempted. Done properly with great independent games spotlighting their designers, we have no fear of failure. Can we guarantee astronomical success with absolute certainty? No. Again, our model works well in another industry. A slow to moderate start is a realistic expectation. Like with any new business or venture, success is the result of concerted effort and time. At the moment, we are pooling the talent without risk to anyone expressing an interest. Something equally important to us is having no fine print or surprises in our contracts. We would rather have a self-publisher decline agreement if not completely comfortable with the terms. The information on our website is intentionally forthcoming. Answers to specific questions are available simply upon asking.

Cogentesque
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Joined: 08/17/2011
Well I for one like the man -

Well I for one like the man - to my untrained ears it sounds good.

good luck to you and all that use you Sir!

p.s. but you do need to tighten up your website man - it feels a little disjointed. Perhaps re-attach the floating menu to the main body, or use a a nice solid colour header or a less impactful background, or colour your logo or some such :)

all the best!

sam

GiggleboxGames
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Joined: 03/04/2012
Thank you!

Thank you, Sam!

I agree with your assessment of our website. Improvements will be implemented before the end of the month. The left menu is disjointed, especially on larger desktops. A new design will be finalized soon.

Hobby game publishers are categorized as self-publishers. Submissions have been received from established and widely recognized names. We have answered questions and mutual interest is ongoing. Throughout March and April, our door is open to all self-publishers. Designers with no desire to self-publish could team up with publishers they know to explore joint ventures. Production is beyond the scope of what we offer. Suggestions and advice we provide may be helpful. Self-publishers must be established or have a solid business plan before a contract can be offered. Understandably, designers do express frustration that this opportunity is limited to self-publishers.

Cogentesque
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Heya Giggly! Yeah totally,

Heya Giggly!

Yeah totally, I'm glad you are going to fix it as it's a little harsh on the eyes.

Tell your designer that he shouldn't use tables to do design elements that are entirely different dividers - it would probably be more appropriate to use the Div tag here. Also the reason for it is he has listed the tables width in percentages - this means that the whole table is stretched across at 90% of the entire screen. It would probably be easier to list the table size as something like 900px and then center the whole div or something :)

In fact, put him on to me and I'll sort him out ;) hehe

As to not derail the thread:

"Have you had any successes yet with anything similar Giggly?"

GiggleboxGames
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Sorted Out

Sam, great observation. The left menu no longer floats. A client’s staff designer created this template a few years ago. She had set the width to 908px. To quickly have an initial website, alternate images and other adjustments were applied. It now matches the designer’s specification, very close to precisely matching the width that you identified. The new website design will correspond with Phase 2.

For many years, I have implemented processes such as these for clients. The one most similar is described in post #5. Although a different industry, distribution is a perfect model for Gigglebox. I have partnering relationships with several marketing experts spanning many clients and industries.

Traz
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production....

Your business model intrigues me, as I think I have something that would be perfect for you. But - I have a problem with the self-production part. I wonder if there could be a 'triangulation' between yourself as the distributor, myself as a designer and someone like... say... the Game Crafters?

Even though my games play well with clients, my production abilities are extremely limited.

Any thoughts on this situation?

GiggleboxGames
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Joined: 03/04/2012
Multiple Options

Traz, there are multiple options. No obligation exists to submit a game. It merely indicates that you would like to be considered and provides enough basic information for us to review the game.

The Game Crafter is a great company and makes self-publishing a reality for many designers. Cost and shipping are key factors. Keep in mind that this is a generic example. If the suggested retail price of a game were $40, the wholesale price would be approximately half. The self-publisher would receive $20 per game plus reasonable shipping. If production cost were $10, gross profit would be $10 equating to 50% of wholesale price and 25% of retail price. The average licensing royalty is only 5%. By self-publishing and having good distribution, a game designer could create a profitable business. In a similar scenario where production cost is $15, gross profit is 25% of wholesale price and 12.5% of retail price. For The Game Crafter to be a viable option, cost would need to fall into an acceptable range. Also, timely production and prompt drop shipping are necessary as well.

Several well-known publishers have submitted games. Teaming up with a publisher as a joint venture may be possible. You would first need to submit your game and affirm by email your permission to share the information. Mention in the comments field that you desire assistance coordinating production. We’ll send an email formatted to affirm your permission. Whether or not selected, I’ll be glad to provide suggestions and advice. If you know a publisher or self-publisher, ask questions and benefit from their expertise.

We have developed a list of not-so-common resources. More detail about your game is necessary to know which referrals are appropriate.

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