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Zombies at your Heels live (well, undead) on Indiegogo

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KAndrw
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Joined: 08/20/2008

http://www.indiegogo.com/zayh

Quote:
Zombies at your Heels is a fun, light-hearted card game for 2 to 4 players. You'll take command of a small group of uninfected humans, fleeing for their lives ahead of an unstoppable wave of the undead. Your success depends on their survival, and their survival will mean working together as a team. Knocking over your opponents' survivors so that the zombies eat them instead will also help.

100% of the profits from Zombies at your Heels will be given to Special Effect, a charity that develops technology and initiatives that help injured and disabled young people to enjoy video games they would not otherwise be able to.

Fixed Funding: This campaign will only receive funds if at least $1,200 is raised by Mon Jul 09 at 11:59PM PT.

1 Copy of Game = $15

Thank you to the people in the BGDF community whose feedback made Zombies at your Heels a better game!

avalaunch
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Joined: 04/13/2012
Good luck! I thought the

Good luck! I thought the video was well done, btw.

KAndrw
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Joined: 08/20/2008
Thanks! I was reasonably

Thanks!

I was reasonably happy with the video, and my wife went to great lengths to assure me that most of what I disliked about it was the usual things people dislike about seeing themselves.

My 1 year old son found the entire thing delightful, so that was nice :)

HandwrittenAnthony
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Joined: 12/01/2011
Good luck!

Good luck with the drive KAndrew! Wonderful cause to be raising funds for as well.

As an aside, I didn't realise IndieGoGo allowed for minimum caps on their projects. That's veeeeery interesting.

KAndrw
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Joined: 08/20/2008
Indiegogo's default funding

Indiegogo's default funding model is 'flexible funding':

* If you reach your target, you get all the money pledged, minus about 8% (combined Indiegogo and Paypal fees)
* If you don't reach target, you still get all the money, but minus about 13%

I really dislike that model, because it has the 'appearence' of dishonesty. If you need $10000, and your minimum pledge for the game is $100, you're saying that you can only make the game if you get $92 from at least 100 people. If you only get $87 from 50 people, you won't be able to make the game - so why are you keeping my money?

They also have 'fixed funding', which is almost identical to the model used on Kickstarter, and is the one I went for:

* If you reach your target, you get all the money pledged, minus about 8% (combined Indiegogo and Paypal fees)
* If you don't reach target, everybody gets their money back

There are admittedly two features available in a flexi campaign that are not available for fix:

* Campaign can last for a maximum of 120 days (cf 60 with fixed)
* People can pay via credit card without using PayPal (cf mandatory PayPal with fixed)

While tempting, those features were not quite enough to overcome the discomfort I have with the way flexible funding feels!

HandwrittenAnthony
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Joined: 12/01/2011
I straight up think

I straight up think all-or-nothing (or fixed funding as IndieGoGo calls it) is the way to go for game development, and doubly so for board games.

Firstly, there's the perception of value implied in fixed funding. If you say "I need 10k to finish this project, and I won't take any less", that says that you know what your $10k is for. You've likely done a budget, and you're willing to risk YOUR time in setting up the campaign for my money. The level of risk management here can instill greater confidence in a fence-sitter than flowery prose on why you game will be awesome.

In contradiction is flexible funding, wherein you say "I need $10k to finish the project, but every little bit helps". The risk now lies solely on the funder: regardless of whether the $10k is reached or not, I spend my money. Will there be enough backers? What happens if the campaign doesn't reach the goal, what will my money go towards?

And as developers, we should be concerned with providing our buyers with everything we promise. Fulfilled promises is customer satisfaction is community building.

Note this is all within the context of funding the development and manufacturing of a game. If the game is already made and you're rustling up marketing or polishing cash, that's a different kettle of fish.

As for the two "features" of flexible funding: if you're doing your marketing right (and lets be honest - crowdfunding a project is an exercise in full-time marketing), most of your pledges will happen at the beginning and end of your run. Spreading out the middle isn't going to catch you that many additional pledge-fishies.

And the choice of merchant is interesting, but I'm not sure many buyers are put off-side by PayPal as much as developers and sellers are.

Anyhow, this was my long-winded way of saying "I agree!", and wishing you luck.

Beriner
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Joined: 04/23/2012
Sorry

I've been gone so I hadn't had a chance to test your game again with the new rules from a few weeks ago, but I'm glad to see that it's ready to go!

Congratulations KAndrw!

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