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ideas stolen?

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pierrelombardi
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how do i know ideas i mention on these forums will not be stolen?

Traz
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answer

You don't.

pierrelombardi
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lol, funny..... so if you

lol, funny.....

so if you have the best idea ever, someone can use it up and become rish from it?

what if some guy thought of the best ideas, and he's a lawer, and uses as a proof that he made those ideas?

NativeTexan
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fear cripples inspiration

Every new designer thinks they have the 'best idea ever'.

Every new designer is worried that someone will steal their idea and 'become rich from it'.

Over time you learn that you do not have the best idea ever.

Over time you learn that no one wants to steal your ideas.

Clever ideas don't result in successful games. Time, energy, relentless commitment to playtesting, and a little bit of luck creates a recipe for success. You can't find that on a forum and you certainly can't steal. You craft it over a period of weeks, months, and sometimes years.

Fear will cripple your inspiration. You've got to let it go.

pierrelombardi
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its that i had this idea

its that i had this idea where you can only move along the board game by rolling the number on which you stand, lets say you stand on a seven, in order to move that turn you must roll a number seven, then you move with the highest dice thrown

ok then thx, for the tip

InvisibleJon
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99% of the time, you're better off sharing...

I've PnP released over 100 games in the past 9 years, and made up another 50 or so that I haven't released. Out of all of these games and ideas, only one has been so gosh-darn commercially viable that I haven't shared it (...And it's killing me! I really, really want to tell everyone I know about it – especially game designers – 'cause it's so darn cool.).

In general, you're going to get better results and a better final product if you collaborate. The only time I'd recommend not sharing your idea is when you can really and truly imagine a big company (Hasbro, etc.) making not just one game, but an entire line of games, based on it. Typically a single mechanic isn't going to be worth keeping to yourself, but something like the "Pop-O-Matic bubble" is worth keeping under wraps and patenting.

InvisibleJon
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Sticky spaces...

pierrelombardi wrote:
its that i had this idea where you can only move along the board game by rolling the number on which you stand, lets say you stand on a seven, in order to move that turn you must roll a number seven, then you move with the highest dice thrown
That's a neat idea, and it does a nice job of creating "sticky" spaces - especially if you're rolling two six-sided dice instead of just one ten-sided die or somesuch.

An idea: You could give players a choice of rolling two six-sided dice and moving the highest or one twelve-sided die and only moving one space. If you're stuck on a 2, 3, 11, or 12, you may find the one-in-twelve odds of moving only one space with a dodecahedron a lot more appealing than the one- or two-in-36 odds of moving a random amount with a pair of cubes.

pierrelombardi
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InvisibleJon

InvisibleJon wrote:
pierrelombardi wrote:
its that i had this idea where you can only move along the board game by rolling the number on which you stand, lets say you stand on a seven, in order to move that turn you must roll a number seven, then you move with the highest dice thrown
That's a neat idea, and it does a nice job of creating "sticky" spaces - especially if you're rolling two six-sided dice instead of just one ten-sided die or somesuch.

An idea: You could give players a choice of rolling two six-sided dice and moving the highest or one twelve-sided die and only moving one space. If you're stuck on a 2, 3, 11, or 12, you may find the one-in-twelve odds of moving only one space with a dodecahedron a lot more appealing than the one- or two-in-36 odds of moving a random amount with a pair of cubes.

well every square in the game has a number, except 7 is the only alone, after that its 6/8 then 5/9 then 4/10, 3,11 and 2/12 as you progresss the game gets more difficult, and you also contain cards that help you along, like some let you switch spots with players, which is really cool....

End of Time Games
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A couple points as I see

A couple points as I see them:

1. There is nothing new under the sun Horacio.

2. People are only interested in their own ideas usually.

3. If your game is unuique you don't have to worry about someone els stealing it because they will not know what to do with it. They don't have your mind.

4.This is not a profitable idustry unless your puting out lots of hit games all the time.

5. Dig in this forum and you will find other material on this question.

ilta
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Point of order, EoTG: your

Point of order, EoTG: your quote is Ecclesiastes, not Hamlet. You're probably thinking of "there are more things in heaven and on earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy;" ironically this actually contradicts the intended idea of your quote, which is that everything's been explored already. :)

As for the topic at hand, as others have said, there's no shortage of ideas (great and lame) waiting to be exploited and wrought into a successful game, and the industry as a whole is barely profitable. Nobody would bother stealing something when ideas are so easy to come by themselves and there's so little to gain.

Moreover, it would be an easy matter to trace a stolen idea to its source -- the guy who posted it on the forum page first. Ironically, your best protection from being beaten to the punch is in fact to talk about your ideas, develop them, improve them through playtesting, and publish them. They won't do you any good locked up inside your desk drawer.

jeffinberlin
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Do it because you enjoy it, not for the money

It's true--worrying about your ideas getting stolen is the first warning sign from a publisher that your are an amateur. Because most ideas (even the one you mentioned) are derivatives of other games already "out there", it can even happen that some seemingly innovative mechanics are actually developed simultaneously by different designers, unbeknownst to each other. It really does happen.

And, as the others mentioned, the real work is not in the idea, but in the work in developing and playtesting. For example, you have one simple idea, but you'll need much more to get the game noticed in this increasingly crowded marketplace. What about theme? Could that add some additional layers to the initial idea? What is your target audience? What publishers do you respect, and want to pitch the game to?

And even if you get a contract, the money you earn won't be worth the time and money spent in developing your idea. Most likely not, any way.

MatthewF
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To add on to what everyone's

To add on to what everyone's already said, basic ideas like yours -- while there could well be good games behind them -- are incredibly easy to come up with, once you've worked at designing games for a while. I could quite literally sit down for an hour and come up with 20 new twists on mechanisms that haven't been used before and that all have potential. That's honestly no form of bragging, it really is something that comes from spending enough time working through game mechanisms/ideas.

As such, there's really no need to steal anyone's idea since you can just come up with a new one of your own. The trick is, as has been said, creating a full-fledged, completely playable, and truly fun game from the idea(s), and the only thing you'll ever sell. Ideas aren't worth anything, and therefore aren't worth stealing.

pierrelombardi
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hmm, well thx everyone for

hmm, well thx everyone for your comments

thought i do have a theme, its the number 7

Steve Ginty
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Sorry if this has been said

Sorry if this has been said already but you could extend the use of 7 as a theme. Maybe have seven main requirements to win, etc. You could call the game "7" too, which would be cool. Plus, making the number "7" the central theme could make the overall game rules far easier to remember, if 7 was key to the mechanics.

brisingre
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Hell, I wish I was in a

Hell, I wish I was in a position to steal ideas. I've got twenty half-finished games of my own, I don't need to any more ideas. Also, nobody ever got rich doing this, to my knowledge, so I'd say your ideas are pretty safe.

InvisibleJon
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Well, that was easy.

brisingre wrote:
I've got twenty half-finished games of my own, I don't need to any more ideas.
...So if you mush 'em together, you'll have ten finished games, right?

(*grin*)

Naw... I know it doesn't work that way. Heck, I'm in the same boat.

...Although, it does suggest an interesting solution.

End of Time Games
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I can understand there is an

I can understand there is an initial feeling when beggining game design of wanting to protect your idea. I have to admit that I came to realise that 1. what board game has cured cancer? 2. So, the world can live without my games. Also the world can live without my art.

So it pays to not take your idea too seriously. I think it's really the ego and wanting to be recognized at the heart of it. Do what makes you happy. If that is board games, perfect, but I wouldn't do it for the money or thinking that your game is going to turn the earth upside down and the ocians into gold. I think what we have here is a long line of designers who came in thinking this way and had a reality check.

Be passionate about this, but don't think you have to protect it. Chances are, you are the only one who would feel that way about your game. I can't think of anygame I have ever seen that if I could steal it I would. It is not the nature of a creator to steal. No one wants your idea. We wish you t he best with it though.

And I have to agree with the idea that it is all about persistance.

What was that ausom thing Dralius said about games and flys on a windshield?

devin
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lol

to bad im in the same place 2 games and nothing to do with them

simpson
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the game designer's adage

the game designer's adage (ala Henny Youngman):

"Take my game, please!"

Steve Ginty
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Why doesn't everyone on the

Why doesn't everyone on the forum create their own company together? Or rather, their own giant design team. Concept games could be voted on to decide which to pursue, then what components seem most attractive, etc.?
Since most game designers don't make real money anyway...

End of Time Games
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I think that would require a

I think that would require a cohesive group to work. Not every one on here thinks alike or close enough to work together. Or has the same tasts. We don't all like the same kinds of games. I could see small groups working together.

simpson
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"Or rather, their own giant

"Or rather, their own giant design team. "

Big groups of designers don't work well together -- one of a designer's strengths is his design opinion.

Also, the amount of effort is going to vary depending on if the designer is a pro, an artisan, or a hobbyist. If a commercial venture was made, how would the group divy the profits?

simpson

pierrelombardi
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yeah, the mechanics use

yeah, the mechanics use seven, the game board has a bunch of sevens in the background, rolling a seven gives you things for rolling it.....i even call it seven

pierrelombardi
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lets make a bunch of groups

lets make a bunch of groups amongs us

seo
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Steve Ginty wrote:Why doesn't

Steve Ginty wrote:
Why doesn't everyone on the forum create their own company together? Or rather, their own giant design team. Concept games could be voted on to decide which to pursue, then what components seem most attractive, etc.?
Since most game designers don't make real money anyway...

As mentioned, it's hard to make a big group of people work well together. But there are lots of BGDFers who have worked together on some games: Jeff Warrender and Steve Sisk have an Indiana Jones game, Doho123 and Sedjtroll have a trains/word game, Zzzzz and myself joined forces for a GDS entry once, and many of us have helped each other on games to the point where it's reasonable to consider the team as a designer and developer team (Sedjtroll comes to my mind again, as he helped me a lot with my tennis card game and so did I with his 9-ball card game).

The key for these teams to work, IMHO, is a similar vision for the game and a good degree of friendship among the designers. I love collaborative work, but wouldn't even try to develop a game with someone else unless I was sure I can freely criticize his ideas without hurting any feelings, and accept his suggestions and critiques in the best possible way. If you find someone like that to work with, it is a great experience.

brisingre
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teaming up

Well, kneuronak (lurker) and I work together on all our stuff, so I suppose I do a lot of work with (one) other BGDF member. Also, if somebody is serious about trying to pull together a giant team, I could maybe do some art for you, depending on what you need. I'm far too into my own ideas to join a design group, but I'd love to help out with visual stuff.

End of Time Games
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Steve Ginty wrote:Why doesn't

Steve Ginty wrote:
Why doesn't everyone on the forum create their own company together? Or rather, their own giant design team. Concept games could be voted on to decide which to pursue, then what components seem most attractive, etc.?
Since most game designers don't make real money anyway...

Actually, sinse you bring this idea up, I have in fact tried to seduce fellow game designers on an idea that I hoped they would sort of take it or work with me or help make something happen.

I have had this idea and have made some developments with it, of designing a style of mechanics that work similar to some card tricks. Not as card tricks themselves, like a long system for predicting a card or creating some dorky illusion, but an interesting way of causeing interesting things to happen in a game. I always thought this could be an interesting aproach. And this kind of was sparked when I saw how some game use lots of cards and how there are decks of card around the board, and how a game I was playing had "mystery" cards that were placed under character cards. Then I remembered some card tricks I had seen and how there was a system of dealing them out.

I'm still contemplating about doing this not only with cards but spaces on a board and how you move, and tiles or tokens places on that board. I beleave you can take principles from these card tricks and apply them in further unkown ways. Anything can be a card. What interesting creative ways can I apply these solid mathematical principles and formulas?

I still want to work with interested designers on ideas like this. I have a limited passion and energy to put in my games and therfore my games do not gain the momentum that would be necessary to where I want them to be or will take some period of time. I don't know how long. Hay if anyone wants to colaborate on Beyond the Wheel, it's on. Just talk to me. If anyone has anything similar or wants to colaborate on this stuff, let me know.

MatthewF
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We did have a group project

We did have a group project here some years back, developing a cavern exploration game. Lots of good ideas, but maybe too many. I think the site owner, Michael/Darkehorse, moved forward with it some more, but I'm not certain.

End of Time Games
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MatthewF wrote:We did have a

MatthewF wrote:
We did have a group project here some years back, developing a cavern exploration game. Lots of good ideas, but maybe too many. I think the site owner, Michael/Darkehorse, moved forward with it some more, but I'm not certain.

Really! When I read this ideas begin to stir. Is there a link to the thread?

Steve Ginty
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Interesting! I have to agree

Interesting! I have to agree with the points but perhaps there are work-arounds to the problems. When there are a myriad of game design options, for example, a voting system might be the way to whittle them down to one.
Game design seems to be hampered by it's main strength: open endedness.

It's nice to know some were able to make it work in the past.

Dralius
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Steve Ginty wrote:Why doesn't

Steve Ginty wrote:
Why doesn't everyone on the forum create their own company together? Or rather, their own giant design team. Concept games could be voted on to decide which to pursue, then what components seem most attractive, etc.?
Since most game designers don't make real money anyway...

1. Start a game company

Everyone here wants to be the company designer but there are many other hats that must be worn which will take away from the time you have to design your games. Deciding who will design the games and who will give up their free time to promote, sell, and otherwise run the business so another person’s game can get published is a sticking point. Running any business is hard work and working hard to get another person’s game published is not what most of up here are looking for. I have not heard a proposal for a balanced system that would allow all participants to have a fair chance of getting their game published. If you could come up with that then you have a starting point and may get some takers.

2. Design teams

It’s great to work with other designers as long as they are compatible. I worked with Mike Petty on World Gauntlet federation which I published as a PDF game. It was his design and I help him polish it but I think my additions bettered the game as a whole. I am also working with Clark Rodeffer on Weird Heraldry which we will be testing at Protospiel this year. The upside of working with a partner is that they keep your energy level up. When you are burned out or at an impasse they may not be and can keep the process moving. They will also approach the project with a different perspective and as long as you’re flexible and willing to try their crazy ideas it often pays off by creating solutions you would not have thought of. In the end whether you design alone or in a team you’ll still need to find a publisher.

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