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Self Publishing an Probability math e-book

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larienna
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I have been reading a bit about probability math lately and I was eventually thinking of writting a document explaining how probability math works. Still, I thought that instead of writting a document, why not write a book that I could sell.

The problem is that english is not my native language, so I am automatically rejected to english publishers, and I am not a mathematician which reduces my credibitily. In the french market where I live, I don't think there an demand high enought for a simple probability math book.

So I was thinking that maybe I could self publish an e-book instead and and sell it for cheap like around 5$. I don't know if like for PDF games, there are websites for publishing e-books on this subject.

Still, even as an e-book, I would prefer having a publisher that can re-read my document and make necessary corrections. But again, most of the time, they don't accepts non-native english speakers.

Do you think it's a good idea?
Do you know any e-book publishers or websites?

scifiantihero
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It seems . . .

. . . like there would be two ways to approach the subject: Write a really complex book about probability, or write a simple layman's book about probability.

It seems like you're going for the latter (since you said it would be simple, and you aren't a mathematician by trade!).

In this case, how much information is there really to convey (enough for a book?) I can't think of very many uses for probability that could be generalized for someone who was not familiar with it (and the specific uses--poker, for instance-- have many books about them already.)

Also, how much can someone who doesn't already know about probability be expected to want to learn about it? Forums I read about games which reward players who can handle probability (magic, and axis and allies for example) all have threads where the topic comes up, and then someone explains how it works fairly well. I don't know how much more than that is needed.

That said, it IS a branch of math that is not at all intuitive, and it is one that most people don't know very well at all. It's something I'd certainly love to read more about, but I'd probably want a bigger, heavier book on the subject. Maybe there are enough people in between people like me, and the confused forum goers who cant understand why they didn't draw a land in three cards when their deck is one third land!

That made me kinda think, too. Are there many accessible, fun, math books out there-- Something analogous to grammar's "The Elements of Style?"

I'd actually love to read a short, accessible book about a math subject (like probability) that explained the simple things and why people got them wrong, gave examples, and maybe poked fun at it a little. That said, I'd probably want to read the real book, and not a pdf. I'd feel like I was paying someone for a blog or something.

So there's my opinion: 'Eh, I dunno of that's a very good idea, but it might actually be a really cool idea!'

:)

(Also, you can self publish hard copy books, just like games. Check out superior print on demand. I only know them, because they've linked their card printing services here, before.)

larienna
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I read various probability

I read various probability books and chapters of non math books that talked about it and everything I read so far approach the subject from very different point of views. So my first idea is that since I am not a mathematician, I might approach the subjet from a point of view that might seem easier to understand.

Second, some probability books assume that you already have some sort of math background which might makes it even more confusing. In one of the book I read, I had an hard time grasping the first chapter. In fact I am not sure I really understood something.

So my goal would be to try to make an easy to grasp book for anybody that at least know the 4 basic math operators, fractions and a few other stuff. But there are so many books out there that it is possible that my book will not stand out from the others.

I don't want to self-Publish physical books since it cost a lot of money to place into production. Considering that I don't want to self-publish phisical games, I will not self-publish physical books.

InvisibleJon
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Just a side comment...

scifiantihero wrote:
That said, it IS a branch of math that is not at all intuitive, and it is one that most people don't know very well at all.
Heck, I'd assert that - in quite a few instances - it's literally counterintuitive. What you expect to be true is incorrect, if not the opposite of what your instinct tells you should be true.

I believe that's one of the reasons people don't understand it well.

larienna
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Which mean that there could

Which mean that there could be a demand for that kind of book?(Probabilitiy math for dummies kind of book).

I imagine I will have to make a book with a lot of examples and illustration and progress slowly in the teaching.

drewdane
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Why not?

larienna wrote:
In one of the book I read, I had an hard time grasping the first chapter. In fact I am not sure I really understood something.

You might want to clear that up before writing a book on the subject. :)
If you use a print-on-demand service like cafepress.com I don't see what the harm would be. The most you could lose is your time (which is of value, so don't discount that!) Since there is no inventory, there is no financial risk for you.

larienna
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Quote:In one of the book I

Quote:
In one of the book I read, I had an hard time grasping the first chapter. In fact I am not sure I really understood something.

Like I said, there are various approach to probability math and you can use it for different purpose. Probably the book I read applied probability math to more advanced concepts.

One of the first things you learn in probability math is to deal with arrangement and combinations. While in the book above, they did not talk about it at all. So it seemed much more abstract which mean that I won't need to go that far in my book.

For the cafepress web site, are you talking about this site:

http://www.cafepress.com/

Because it does not seems like a book website at all.

larienna
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Joined: 07/28/2008
Quote:In one of the book I

Quote:
In one of the book I read, I had an hard time grasping the first chapter. In fact I am not sure I really understood something.

Like I said, there are various approach to probability math and you can use it for different purpose. Probably the book I read applied probability math to more advanced concepts.

One of the first things you learn in probability math is to deal with arrangement and combinations. While in the book above, they did not talk about it at all. So it seemed much more abstract which mean that I won't need to go that far in my book.

For the cafepress web site, are you talking about this site:

http://www.cafepress.com/

Because it does not seems like a book website at all.

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