Skip to Content

rules for my board game

10 replies [Last post]
bigbc
Offline
Joined: 12/31/1969

I started to make a board game because i couldnt find one out there that really interested me and that was both entertaining and challenging. I have made up some of the rules but would like in put on how to change them for the better. All help is greatly appreciated.

Setting the stage:
In the beginning the board is clear without anything on it. In order to let the game have variety the board can change every game. The opponents throw dice and whoever’s score is higher goes first. At this point you can place water, bridges and trees. On ever turn four squares worth of these are placed on board. Players take turns alternating placing these on the board. This continues for 12 rounds, a round consisting of both players placing pieces.
Types of terrain:
• Trees: These are the only destroyable type of terrain. However only cannons have the ability to destroy them. In order for cannons to destroy trees there must be at least two cannons on the attacking square. Then the normal cannon attacking rules apply. They are laid in single blocks.
• Water is impassable to every type of unit and can not be destroyed. They must be laid in blocks of four.
• Bridges can be placed over water that has been placed by you or your opponent. Bridges cannot be over two blocks long, but they can be any width. Bridges are laid two blocks at a time. And must be placed from bank to bank when they are placed on the board.
Types of units:

• Foot soldiers are the bread and butter any army. They each are worth one hit point. They move only one space for the number on the dice rolled. Example: An eight is rolled, one unit can move eight spaces or a number of units can move a total of eight spaces.
• The cavalry is the next level of the army. They are the fast moving units. They are each worth three hit points. Cavalry has the ability to move two spaces for each number rolled. Example: A six is rolled, the cavalry can move twelve spaces or any number of cavalry can move twelve spaces.
• Cannons are the assault weapons of the forces. Cannons are great for barraging enemies on any given turn. Cannons nave the ability to attack two squares away (there can be only one space between the cannons and their targets). Their shots aren’t always accurate though and in order to determine if the round was successful the dice are rolled, if the total is even then the shots were accurate; if odds were rolled then the shot missed. Each cannon, if shot was successful, deals three hit points worth of damage. Cannons are slow and when they move they take two numbers to move one space. Example: A six is rolled, then a cannon can move three spaces, or any number of cannons can move so that their totals equal three spaces. A benefit of cannons is that they cannot be lost during firing, if the target is two squares away and is not a cannon, because units cannot attack two squares away.
Attacking:
In order to attack the aggressor must be adjacent, and only one square away (except for cannons), from whom they are attacking. Both the aggressor and the defender roll two dice. The each side then totals their dice. Next they add the number of hit points on their square to the number rolled, this number is known as the battle number. The lower battle number is subtracted from the higher. This number is the damage that is inflicted on the enemy. Damage totals are taken from the total hit points on a single square. Damage is taken piece by piece. If there are less than 6 hit points worth of units on a square, attacking or defending, then only one die is rolled.
Surprise Attack:
In order to be considered a surprise attack the defender must have either been stationary for a single turn or be traveling in another direction. You can attack/be attacked from behind, the sides as well as the front. In a surprise attack the aggressor is given the advantage. On the first roll and only on the first roll the aggressor gets 25% of the enemies hit points added on to their battle number.
Ex:
The aggressor attacks with five foot soldiers to the enemy with four foot soldiers. The aggressor rolls a four and a three. This equals seven then the unit hit points are added 7+5=12. Then the surprise attack bonus is add, 25% of 4 is 1, so 12+1=13. The defender rolls a 5 and a 1 (5+1=6). Then the unit hit points are added (6+4=10). The aggressor battle number is higher so the defenders battle number is subtracted from it (13-10=3). The defender suffers a loss of three hit points. Three foot soldiers are taken from the defenders square. This leaves only 1 on the square to go into the next battle.

Jpwoo
Jpwoo's picture
Offline
Joined: 03/26/2009
rules for my board game

Hello! Welcome to the BGDF and thanks for posting your ideas.

This place seems a harsh crucibile of love and helpfulness. So let me get started.

Quote:
I started to make a board game because i couldnt find one out there that really interested me and that was both entertaining and challenging.

!!

Quote:
In the beginning the board is clear without anything on it. In order to let the game have variety the board can change every game.

As interesting as building terrain can be, it is one of the big reasons I don't play heroscape much. I would rather get right into playing the game.

I think I would rather play a game with some well tested interesting maps, Perhaps just some basic maps, and some terrain, like forests and bridges that the players add at the start. Best of both worlds.

Quote:
An eight is rolled, one unit can move eight spaces or a number of units can move a total of eight spaces.

You roll every turn for each of the three types of units?

How big are the maps going to be? up to 24 spaces in a turn is a lot!

Just as a gut feeling, I don't like random movement amounts. It makes planning ahead difficult.

If you want some random element to movement what about something like changing weather that would give a penalty to movement that is rolled every turn.

Quote:
Cannons nave the ability to attack two squares away (there can be only one space between the cannons and their targets).

In a game where units can move very far, 2 spaces doesn't seem like much range.

Quote:
On the first roll and only on the first roll the aggressor gets 25% of the enemies hit points added on to their battle number.

Throwing a percentage into the game seems weird. What about rounding? What is 25% of 9?

If you phrased the bonus as +1 for every 4 units attacking it would be a little more clear.

Quote:
In order to be considered a surprise attack the defender must have either been stationary for a single turn or be traveling in another direction. You can attack/be attacked from behind, the sides as well as the front.

I'm not sure I understand this.

Just a few questions.

How do you get units? Do you have a set number of them? Do you generate them somehow during the game?

How big of a map are you planning on? On average if this is a variable number too.

I'm guessing you mean 2d6 when you say roll the dice in this game.

How does the game end? After a set number of turns or when everyone is dead, or something else?

Infernal
Offline
Joined: 12/31/1969
rules for my board game

If you are interested in making a chalenging game I would have the Cannons being able to beat Infantry, Infantry able to beat cavalry and the Cavalry able to beat the Cannons. This cyclic relationship of "who beat who", gives the game a dynamic strategy. There is no best unit so you must constantly change your strategy so that your enemy can't exploit it.

eg: If I decided that cavalry were good because they could move fast then you could just play lots of infantry to counter that. If I didn't change mey strategy to playing cannons to counter your infantry then you would win. If I did play cannons then you would have to play cavalry to counter me, and so on. This will give the players much more variety to the game and allow for even more subtle strategies (If I have played cavalry then I know that they are going to try to counter me woth infantry so I will prepare some cannons and lue them into a trap).

You already have the beginnings of this type of system (cannons will beat Infantry and Cavalry will beat Cannons. All you have to do si make some method of allowing Infantry able to beat Cavalry (maybe give them the ability to attack first in melee - this would allow them to kill cavalry before they could be attacked and cannons could still shoot them at range).

Traditionally infantry were able to beat cavalry because of pikes (like a realy long spear) that could hit the cavalry before they cavalry could close into sword range. Also horses would not charge into an infantry line that was bristleing with pointy objects (those pikes), so if an infantry line heald then they would not be able to be charged and attacked by cavalry easily. Archers (and other ranged troops) would have an advantage over infantry because they could move quickly and hit them at range. Cavalry were good against Ranged units because they were so fast they could close with the ranged units without suffering too many casualties, also because the ranged troops were usually pread out and didn't have long pointy sticks (pikes) they were able to be charged and the full force of the cavalry could be employed.

TheReluctantGeneral
Offline
Joined: 12/31/1969
rules for my board game

Hi there bigbc. You omitted to say in your rules description, how players initially setup their armies. This would seem to be a rather important aspect of the game.

Unit setup could be made to compliment the terrain setup phase (I like the idea of players setting up the terrain themselves but I agree with JP's point about it perhaps taking a little long).

But the bigger problem I see with the terrain setup is that since the unit fighting abilities are not affected by it, and (in the absence of further info) I am assuming both players have the same mix of units, the players have no real strategic reason to place terrain. I think you either need to have different opposing armies, or have attacker and defender roles (perhaps where the defender sets up most of the terrain).

I also agree with JP that the random movement over such potentially huge distances will make it impossible to plan or form coherent strategy. However, this could perhaps be reduced by assigning each unit a 'zone of control' (ZOC), that extends forward one or more spaces from a square occupied by forces. Opposing pieces may move into an enemy ZOC but may not move through it. This allows for careful deployment of ones forces to restrict the enemy movement, just like in a real battle.

bigbc
Offline
Joined: 12/31/1969
answering some questions

Sorry about not have clarified some things the board is 28 squares by 24 squares. Also Units are bought at the beginning of each turn, each player being given 250 dollars. Each type of unit has a differnet price:
Infantry- 75
Cavalary-125
Cannon-250
All units are created at a barracks and are placed at atouching adjencent square
Also as for the purpose of terrian its to create blocks and determing the flow of action.
Thanks for comments and more would be apreciated

bigbc
Offline
Joined: 12/31/1969
and...

I forgot to say that the game ends when the opponenet is eliminated or if on so chooses, at a certian time limit and then a players total worth is determined or something like that

OutsideLime
Offline
Joined: 12/31/1969
Re: answering some questions

bigbc wrote:
Sorry about not have clarified some things the board is 28 squares by 24 squares. Also Units are bought at the beginning of each turn, each player being given 250 dollars. Each type of unit has a differnet price:
Infantry- 75
Cavalary-125
Cannon-250
All units are created at a barracks and are placed at atouching adjencent square
Also as for the purpose of terrian its to create blocks and determing the flow of action.
Thanks for comments and more would be apreciated

Simplify, simplify. Math is not fun for most people. (I myself think it's kinda fun, and then only in certain contexts.) You can easily scale these numbers down to a much more manageable equivalent of perfect ratio:

Infantry - 3
Cavalry - 5
Cannon - 10

Each player starts with $10. Keeping the numbers small like this will eliminate a LOT of wasted time trying to add/subtract 75s, 125s and 250s. Leave the calculators at home and let your players spend their time playing the game, not figuring out the economy of reinforcement.

~Josh

OutsideLime
Offline
Joined: 12/31/1969
rules for my board game

Also, I would like to cast my vote for Infernal as "Greatest Proponent of Non-Transitive Relationships in Gaming, Ever."

~Josh

Infernal
Offline
Joined: 12/31/1969
rules for my board game

Quote:
Also, I would like to cast my vote for Infernal as "Greatest Proponent of Non-Transitive Relationships in Gaming, Ever."

I humbly accept :D

the reson that I likem it is because it gives an easy way to add strategic and tactical depth to a game with the minimal amount of fuss (so it is just me being slack actually :D)

Quote:
Also Units are bought at the beginning of each turn, each player being given 250 dollars.

How do players get money through the game (and how much)? This will effect the type of strategies that are available. If there is not much income then the loss of a unit (and unit) is expensive, this will favour players who are able to attack an enemy without being attacked back, where as a game with lots of money coming in will favour a strategy of sending waves of troops at them and hopeing to get luck (or even just to pin down their troops in an area denial strategy).

Also if income is tied to certain locations then area control becomes important. If income is more abstracted and not as part of the game board then area control becomes less of an issue and a "suply line" comesinto effect where the player needs to protect the troops that are moving towards the "front lines" on the game board.

bigbc
Offline
Joined: 12/31/1969
explination

I had orginally thought that income would come as a set amount at the begining of a turn. But i now think that perhaps controlling an area such as a gold mine or something which gives you extra money at the begining of a turn. Imput please...

OutsideLime
Offline
Joined: 12/31/1969
rules for my board game

Quote:
I had orginally thought that income would come as a set amount at the begining of a turn. But i now think that perhaps controlling an area such as a gold mine or something which gives you extra money at the begining of a turn. Imput please...

Use both.

~Josh

To expand - everyone gets a base income at turn start. By controlling specific territory (gold mines), players can increase that income.

Making the gold-mines deficient in strategic value or Victory-Point generation helps balance their value and puts the choice upon the player. (eg - do I seize the gold mine and get a greater income, even though it doesn't earn me any VP, or do I seize the Castle, which will earn me a VP but doesn't bolster my income.) Obviously you may not have castles or even VP in your game, but the principle remains sound.

Syndicate content


forum | by Dr. Radut