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Wanted: Ideas for Unexplored Dungeon mechanic.

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phpbbadmin
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Ok folks, a quick intro: I'm working on a game where players take on a dual role of controlling a set of adventurers infiltrating your opponent's dungeon, as well as the role of a DM running a dungeon and trying to thwart your opponent's adventurers.

Here's my dilemna:
Each player, in the role of DM, lays out their dungeon and stocks it with monsters, traps, treasures, etc. I want a mechanic that 'darkens' out the unexplored areas of the dungeon, so that contents of rooms obviously won't be revealed until those rooms are visited -and- that unexplored portions of the dungeon are darkened so that the opponent won't know that there might be rooms there to begin with, if that makes sense.

Any ideas? I haven't played a lot of dungeon crawlers so I have no real point of reference.

-Darke

Julius
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Wanted: Ideas for Unexplored Dungeon mechanic.

The easy way is to put the rooms on cards that are face down, and flip them over when a player visits them.

phpbbadmin
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Wanted: Ideas for Unexplored Dungeon mechanic.

Julius wrote:
The easy way is to put the rooms on cards that are face down, and flip them over when a player visits them.

I've obviously thought of that, but as I stated, I need a mechanic that doesn't give away the existance of rooms, plus I need to be able to load the rooms with monsters, traps, etc.

-Darke

sedjtroll
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Wanted: Ideas for Unexplored Dungeon mechanic.

Some of the cards could be blank.

Also, each card (I was going to say 'tile') could be 'populated' by 2-3 face down chits... again, some of which are blank. The chits have things like treasures, Monsters, Items, whatever you might find in a dungeon.

Maybe you don't populatr a room until you are within a certain number of spaces, at which time you might hear noise from certain types of chits (they might have a colored border or something)

- Seth

hawaiiirish
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Wanted: Ideas for Unexplored Dungeon mechanic.

Here's what I see:

a deck of room tiles (or deck of room cards, take your pick) that specifies the contents of the room (monsters, treasure, etc.). Within that deck, the DM player is also given some "dummy" room tiles (or cards) that act to seed the deck. In that way - the player has no idea what's around the next corner, right?

The DM can "layout" the dungeon into the deck. For each opened door or corner turned, the player places a new card.

The only problem I see with that is that you might have a finite number of "dummy" tiles - but, again, that is mitigated by the DM laying out the dungeon.

[Edit] Seth and I were on the same page (post?) ... hmm ... sorry for the copy, Seth. May I say, "Great Idea" ;)

Krakit
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Wanted: Ideas for Unexplored Dungeon mechanic.

Check out FF's Doom for ideas on how to do this.

Carl

Julius
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Wanted: Ideas for Unexplored Dungeon mechanic.

The 'dungeon' for each player could be fixed. The game board has two matching dungeons with empty corridors and rooms drawn on it, as well as a marked entrance and goal (treasure, princess, dragon, or whatever).

However, the contents of those rooms, corridors, and whatnot are up to the dm to determine. With this, use the blank card idea. You might place a trap in one corridor, and two decoys in the other (Evil Grin).

This will definately simplify your game rules quite a bit.

Jebbou
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Wanted: Ideas for Unexplored Dungeon mechanic.

Instead of face down cards, each player could build their board using large tiles, each containing a corridor or room (a little bit like Doom, but all tiles would have the same size). It would be build behind a large pannel preventing the other player from seeing. A large cardboard rectangle could surround those tiles, thus preventing them from moving (Optional). Players would then cover the board with black cardboard tiles, to simulate a "fog of war". There could be one black tile to cover one room tile. Each time a room or corridor is explored, the black tile is removed to display the room's content. Using black tiles remove the necessity of playing with face-down material, and having to "flip" the tiles face up (this can be a bother if you have material on tiles that are next to the one you flip). You could even prepopulate the dungeon with traps, monsters and chests, and then cover the each room with a black tile, along with its content. The major drawback of this setup is obviously the insane amount of material required to build this game (Room tiles, black tiles, large pannel to hide game setup, tiles for monsters, chests and traps, etc).

OutsideLime
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Wanted: Ideas for Unexplored Dungeon mechanic.

... a very interesting idea...by letting players create dungeons for each other, you give them the opportunity to decipher each others' styles in trickery, trappery, and monstery. (1 out of 3 on word-realism ain't so bad, is it?)

The ingredients from which each player creates their dungeon must be fixed and finite (else why not put a Death spell on every door and chest, a platinum dragon in every chamber?), plus there must be a successful way to survive the whole thing. That may be counting on players' lenience as DMs a bit too much.

I am very interested to learn how you can guide your players into creating challenging yet necessarily solvable dungeons for each other, once you get past this hidden-information problem... in the meantime I will try to think of a solution that hasn't been touched by other posters...

Perhaps a fixed grid of squares... say 10 x 10. 100 possible spaces, total. Each player must build a dungeon (while screened from the other player) that is composed of say, 50 room tiles. Room tiles are placed face-up in the grid, and monster/treasure/trap tokens (or however you intend to convey encounters in general) are placed into their respective rooms. Now, a blank "cover" tile is placed on each square of the grid, including empty ones. You have now a pre-existing dungeon with reasonably obscure dimensions, and all encounters set in place pre-start.

~Josh

OutsideLime
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Wanted: Ideas for Unexplored Dungeon mechanic.

sigh.... Jebbou, you out-typed me.

~Josh

TheReluctantGeneral
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Wanted: Ideas for Unexplored Dungeon mechanic.

HawaiiIrish wrote:
Here's what I see:

The DM can "layout" the dungeon into the deck. For each opened door or corner turned, the player places a new card.

I think this system makes the most sense to me. I'd view the dungeon as a series of nodes connected in specific ways, rather than as a specific geography in which each section of corridoor gets it's own tile(s).

The 'dungeon as card deck' mechanic also opens up the possibility of the opposing DM's dynamically creating the dungeon as they go along in response to his opponents success of failure in a given room. You could require that the DM deploy new room cards 2 or 3 moves ahead of the point at which enemy adventurers would encounter said room, such that the enemy adventurers always have a range of possibilities open to them.

Then the DM that runs out of cards first or fails to deploy sufficient cards to keep his interlopers busy looses, or must deploy the 'end of level baddie' card or whatever.

If you want to more closely link the opposing dungeon/adventure party games, make the DM's choose between deploying cards to set out more dungeon against the enemy adventurers, or play cards to bolster his own adventurers in the enemy dungeon.

If cards were dual use (i.e. had function as both dungeon room/trap/monster AND as adventurer power ups) then some real tactical tension could be introduced.

Nestalawe
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Wanted: Ideas for Unexplored Dungeon mechanic.

TheReluctantGeneral wrote:

The 'dungeon as card deck' mechanic also opens up the possibility of the opposing DM's dynamically creating the dungeon as they go along in response to his opponents success of failure in a given room. You could require that the DM deploy new room cards 2 or 3 moves ahead of the point at which enemy adventurers would encounter said room, such that the enemy adventurers always have a range of possibilities open to them.

I see this as being one of the key considerations - do you want players, in their DM role, to lay out the whole dungeon, part of the dungeon or only the 'next bit' of the dungeon.

If you lay out the whole dungeon, players have free reign over where they go, and they may end up not going to certain places. This could be good, or it could be bad -

- If the dungeon is layed out a bit ahead of the adventurers, then they will most likely end up encountering most of the 'stuff' you have to put into the dungeon, as opposed to having the majority of the dungeon already laid out (above) in which case it is likely that players will not encounter certain things.

TheReluctantGeneral
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Wanted: Ideas for Unexplored Dungeon mechanic.

Nestalawe wrote:
- If the dungeon is layed out a bit ahead of the adventurers, then they will most likely end up encountering most of the 'stuff' you have to put into the dungeon, as opposed to having the majority of the dungeon already laid out (above) in which case it is likely that players will not encounter certain things.

Perhaps, although you could arange it such that dungeon forks not followed represent cards which are effectively wasted by the DM. Could be a pain, or might turn out to be a gameplay/strategy enhancer. How big do you want the card/tile deck to get?

In any case, perhaps with a suitable scheme for linking locations, enemy adventurers could be lured down one path (encountering strength sapping traps and beasties on the way) only to find it connects back to one of the previously layed cards - making the journey a wasted one as far as the adventurers are concerned.

In this type of game, I guess that the mechanic that makes connections betwen nodes would be king. Not sure how this would be achieved though.

The daemon's in the detail, as always.

Gogolski
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Wanted: Ideas for Unexplored Dungeon mechanic.

One more tile-idea:

There is a central bord with four rooms/areas of different types (stone castle-like hall; cavern; forested canyon; something-else).

Each player builds his dungeon using small tiles, but confrontations are resolved on the central board.

Stuff to use on the central board:
- Circle of sight: a plastic circle that defines the area that explorers see. You only populate that area with features.
- Walls: The rooms have different sizes and shapes, but you put walls in place as your opponents explore and see your dungeon/castle...
- Chits: Everything from monster over dust-pile to furniture or nothing-at-all. Chits should probably come in different vallues. (Dust is less exiting than a demon on his treasure-hoard)

==> Each tile could have a maximum value of chits that can be used in it. (This number goes up as you progress, some previously unseen stuff may be added on the way back if a room allows for it)
==> After a room is 'cleaned' (or declared clean by the DM), the DM puts the chits from the central board on the tile of his own dungeon, to mark what was/is there.
==> After a room is 'cleaned' (or declared clean by the DM), both the DM and players blindly take chits of certain vallues according to the encounter. So each player can strategicly plan his next rooms...

Maybe chits can involve either dungeon building and/or exploring.
==> Do you put the sword chit in your dungeon for others to find and use or do you find the sword in another player's dungeon to use yourself? Putting it in your dungeon for other players, should allow you to take extra chits or something; while using it yourself, does not and even limits your chit-choice by one (the sword itself)...

Cheese!

Hedge-o-Matic
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Wanted: Ideas for Unexplored Dungeon mechanic.

I've actually done three games of this sort. You know how it is, you finish one game, and do another "version" of the same theme with modified mechanics, and so on.

The way I handled this was either card-based or tle based. Personally, I thought the tiles had more of a dungeon-crawl feel. To control the insanity, I had the players constructing actual places to be used, rather than death-filled mazes. Sure, there were traps, and monsters, but the players themselves were physically placed within their own catacombs, and their designs were meant to help them rather than hinder someone else. Traps were dangerous to everyone, and made using the spaces very difficult if not placed intelligently.

The basic format was each tile had a 6x6 grid on it, and this grid had corridors and rooms designated. These could be partially obscured by placing 3x3 cards over them, and altered in the same way, but the geography was generally visible.

The contents and uses of the rooms were controlled by chits and cards. Potion Breweries, for example, could only be set up in a room of 3x3 or larger, while torture chambers could be far smaller, and cells could be single spaces (or, if you were feeling very evil, you could pack multiple captives into single spaces). There was a full set of useful locations available, of course.

Torture actually served a useful purpose, since there was information to learn, but this was best carried out by a specialist, who needed to be paid, and would need a place to live, and so on. So the dungeons grew out of necessity, rather than sprawling for no reason. And they tended to become intelligently sectioned off. The prisoners were kept in the area with the cells, not near the armor works or the magic library. Money-making schemes could be set up in the dungeon, but players tended to (wisely) restrict these to just what was needed, or else they had to build cumbersome and otherwise-useless treasure chambers to store all of their unused loot, and this tended to attract NPC adventurers, which were generally destructive and didn't know anything of importance.

The areas were usually isolated by defensive perimiters of monsters, spells, or traps, but often players would set up secret passages to bypass much of this, allowing their wizard to move more freely. Nothing more bothersome than turning off trap in order to get past it (and then having to choose whether or not to leave it off... sometime an evil wizard had to get by in a hurry!), or having to move about with monster-tenders so you don't have to defend yourself from the monsters in your own dungeon (you don't want to damage them, after all)!

So, basically, I think that what made this design work is the idea that dungeons aren't set up to be amusement parks of death (though they tend to turn into that later). Keep in mind that fact that a dungeon is built for a reason, and it will make busting into them far more fun and interesting than just a series of danger-filled rooms and corridors.

phpbbadmin
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Great ideas

Guys,

Some great ideas here, but a lot of them have the tendency to drastically change the mechanics I already have in place, so for that reason I will be unable to use them.

I like the idea of using 'bluff' room tiles with unexplored areas, but I'm thinking some sort of mechanical cover is probably the best way to go, albeit difficult to implement...

I also believe that a panel is necessary, but only while the DM adds things to his dungeon. I also like the 10 X 10 grid idea. It gives the adventurers some point of reference, I.E. they hit the exterior wall of the dungeon (we could assume that this isn't actually an underground dungeon, but more like a square above ground keep.)

I don't necessarily like the idea of playing rooms dynamically, because I think that lends itself to throwing everything the DM has at the adventurers every chance he gets. If the DM is forced to plan the dungeon, then perhaps the adventurers will be able to skip a particularly nasty room, and it also forces the DM to consider placing his forces evenly versus creating specific room strong holds.

Any more ideas?
-Darke

Nestalawe
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Wanted: Ideas for Unexplored Dungeon mechanic.

Hedge-o-Matic wrote:
I've actually done three games of this sort. You know how it is, you finish one game, and do another "version" of the same theme with modified mechanics, and so on...

Whoa, sounds very cool! Is/Are the game/s finished? Do you need a playtester? ;)

phpbbadmin
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Wanted: Ideas for Unexplored Dungeon mechanic.

Hedge-o-Matic wrote:
Keep in mind that fact that a dungeon is built for a reason, and it will make busting into them far more fun and interesting than just a series of danger-filled rooms and corridors.

Actually I'm going for the latter effect; I.E. as you stated, "Amusement Parks of Death". Your idea for a dungeon sounds clever, but I think a bit more complicated than what I'm aiming for in this game.

-Darke

Hedge-o-Matic
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Wanted: Ideas for Unexplored Dungeon mechanic.

Nestalawe wrote:

Whoa, sounds very cool! Is/Are the game/s finished? Do you need a playtester? ;)

Yup, but not to the degree of finish I currently consider ready for public exposure. The graphics for them, in particular, need massive reworking. All three were playtested a lot with crude sets. I could forward some rules to you, if you were interested.

jwarrend
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Wanted: Ideas for Unexplored Dungeon mechanic.

I think the basic idea in this game is interesting!

I have a concern, though. My guess is that, for reasons of fairness, most likely each player will have a nearly identical set of dungeon elements -- roughly the same number and variety of traps, treasures, monsters, etc. So, each player will lay out his dungeon from these elements. My concern is, what will be the difference between a dungeon laid out by a player and one assembled at random? What does a "good" dungeon look like? I fear you may be giving the players the appearance of an important decision (and one that will be very time consuming to perform) when in actual practice it may not be that important.

Another basic conceptual question. Let's say there are 4 players in the game. Does each player send a party into one other player's dungeon, or into all other players' dungeons, or one at a time? When does the game end, and how is it won?

Depending on how you do things, I think it might be interesting to having a mechanic whereby players have to draft their adventurers and the monsters in their dungeons. THEN there would be some decisions, since you want to construct your dungeon to emphasize the deficiencies of other players' parties. For example, if you can keep Joe from getting a thief in his party, you can toss in a bunch of locked doors and it will really give him problems.

I suspect the blind layout can be handled, I'm just wondering out loud how the game works and what in the game makes this layout phase important or interesting.

Sounds like a fun idea, though; good luck!

-Jeff

Krakit
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Wanted: Ideas for Unexplored Dungeon mechanic.

I think I've finally sussed it. Tell me what you think (it'll be expensive).

Each DM is given a Battleship type board. You lay out your dungeon in miniature with square elements and place components in rooms with pegs of different colors (red for monster, yellow for treasure and green for weapons).

In other words, replace the battleships with room shapes and put holes in the rooms to accomodate the pegs.

Now you can lay out the tiles as they are visited and correspond to your battleship laptop thingie.

Carl

phpbbadmin
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Wanted: Ideas for Unexplored Dungeon mechanic.

jwarrend wrote:
I think the basic idea in this game is interesting!

I have a concern, though. My guess is that, for reasons of fairness, most likely each player will have a nearly identical set of dungeon elements -- roughly the same number and variety of traps, treasures, monsters, etc. So, each player will lay out his dungeon from these elements. My concern is, what will be the difference between a dungeon laid out by a player and one assembled at random? What does a "good" dungeon look like? I fear you may be giving the players the appearance of an important decision (and one that will be very time consuming to perform) when in actual practice it may not be that important.

Another basic conceptual question. Let's say there are 4 players in the game. Does each player send a party into one other player's dungeon, or into all other players' dungeons, or one at a time? When does the game end, and how is it won?

Depending on how you do things, I think it might be interesting to having a mechanic whereby players have to draft their adventurers and the monsters in their dungeons. THEN there would be some decisions, since you want to construct your dungeon to emphasize the deficiencies of other players' parties. For example, if you can keep Joe from getting a thief in his party, you can toss in a bunch of locked doors and it will really give him problems.

I suspect the blind layout can be handled, I'm just wondering out loud how the game works and what in the game makes this layout phase important or interesting.

Sounds like a fun idea, though; good luck!

-Jeff

Jeff,

Actually the distribution of monsters, adventurers, items, traps, rooms, etc ARE in fact handled by a TTR like drafting mechanic, so everything *should* be meaningful. That actually will probably answer a lot of your concerns. Also it should be noted that this is a two player only game. It's probably possible to do it multiplayer, but I thought it would be too difficult to implement initially.

Thoughts?
-Michael

phpbbadmin
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Wanted: Ideas for Unexplored Dungeon mechanic.

Krakit wrote:
I think I've finally sussed it. Tell me what you think (it'll be expensive).

Each DM is given a Battleship type board. You lay out your dungeon in miniature with square elements and place components in rooms with pegs of different colors (red for monster, yellow for treasure and green for weapons).

In other words, replace the battleships with room shapes and put holes in the rooms to accomodate the pegs.

Now you can lay out the tiles as they are visited and correspond to your battleship laptop thingie.

Carl

Krakit,

Thanks for pondering it, but I must say I'm not too keen on the battleship mechanic. If I remember correctly, there was a dungeon game from Japan that had a similar mechanic.

-Darke

TheReluctantGeneral
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Wanted: Ideas for Unexplored Dungeon mechanic.

Perhaps some magnetic sheeting would work here. You have substrate tiles, to which dungeon tiles are magetically attached. Monsters and so on are then magnetically attached to dungeon tiles.

Then 'dungeon tiles' and various traps, beasties and so forth can be placed by the DM behind a screen, all face up, in the right positions, making dungeon planning easy and straight forward.

Having finished the dungeon layout, all tiles are flipped over, only to be revealed when adventurers reach that tile. Further, if monster/trap counters are placed face down, then you can add the circle of sight mechanism suggest by (I think) gogolski, so adventurers can see the dungeon layout on a per-tile basis, but specific items within that tile are only flipped over when they advance within say 2 squares of the item.

Constructing the tiles could be tricky, since you need two layers of magnetism - one to stick dungeon tiles to the substrate tiles, and one to stick individual traps and monsters to the dungeon tiles. I think it could be done like this (the diagram shows tiles in their post deployment 'hidden' mode):

Substrate tiles (say 3x3 squares)

side B
+-------------------------------------------------------+
| side A | <- slightly raised sides
| substrate tile, with metal sheet on side A | (not to scale)

Dungeon tiles (1 square each):

+--------------+ +--------------+ +--------------+ <- side A = magnetic
+--------------+ +--------------+ +--------------+ <- filler layer
+--------------+ +--------------+ +--------------+ <- side B = metalsheet

The metal sheet is overlaid with dungeon tile image stickers

Side A of dungeon tiles stick to side A of substrate tiles

Unit/trap/item tiles:

As for dungeon tiles, but stickers represent items & monsters etc, and no need for the final metal sheeting layer.

The substrate tiles have 'sides' high enough to accomodate one dungeon tile and one item tile such that when it is flipped into 'hidden' mode the resulting tile stack remains clear of the playing surface.

You may be thinking that the polarity of the magnetic sheet would prevent this double layering of magnetic sheeting from working. However I believe that the polarity of the magnetic field lines in this type of sheeting is parallel to the plane of the sheet, which should allow this scheme to work. Also the magnetic sheets I am talking about are strong enough to hold metal miniatures, so should more than suffice for counters.

Finally, if the magnetic sheeting does not work for reasons of polarity or expense (these sheets - magentic or steel, seem to retail around $6 per A4 page), then perhaps some kind of 'clickable' base solution could be substituted - though this could be very expensive to produce.

|

Hedge-o-Matic
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Wanted: Ideas for Unexplored Dungeon mechanic.

TheReluctantGeneral wrote:
...these sheets - magentic or steel...

Steel dungeon tiles. Man, you are so hardcore! That's be awesome. Heavy, but awesome.

TheReluctantGeneral
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Wanted: Ideas for Unexplored Dungeon mechanic.

Hedge-o-Matic wrote:
...Heavy, but awesome.

Nope, just awesome ;-) The steel sheeting is 0.02" thick, as is the magnetic sheeting. See

http://www.litkoaero.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Store_Code=LAI&Category_Code=MB

for just one example.

seo
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Wanted: Ideas for Unexplored Dungeon mechanic.

The magnetic rubber material commonly used fo fridge magnets works fine for both the tiles and the items and monsters.
I've just checked and I you can easily place three layers of this material one onto another and turn it upside down without any problem.

Seo

Bozonoir
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Wanted: Ideas for Unexplored Dungeon mechanic.

My two cents...

first, sounds like a wonderful game in the offing. can't wait to play it.

when you wrote it up what i immediately thought of was a two person game with opposing sides. a fixed board between the two players with a grid of say 9 tiles. The tiles would contain a number of rooms and passages with multiple in and out sections to other tiles. If they dead-end into the edges of fixed board then so be it. Each player tries to get from their entry point to the opposite entry point, as exit. This grid of tiles could be randomly shuffled or the players could take turns placing dealt tiles.

So far as the dm'ing mechanic, i was thinking of a Stratego-like chess piece that, as others have mentioned, would hold monster/treasure/trap/dummy symbols. The piece would be revealed only when a player lands in the room. Each DM would have as many pieces as rooms. For an added measure, you could provide generic trap/monster type counters and then have the adventurer draw from a challenge deck/trap deck/treasure deck - but then i like some random in with my strategy.

phpbbadmin
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OK

Guys,

I appreciate the ideas regarding the magnetic solution. It's a little bit more complicated than I had wanted.

Here's what I'm considering:

Make each player's dungeon a 10 X 10 grid of rooms. This dungeon 'board' consists of three levels of cardboard. The first level is just the base. The 2nd level is a grid laid affixed to the first level, where the squares of the grid are equal to the size of the room tiles. This 2nd level is twice as thick as a room tile. This will allow for the room to be placed inside of the grid, as well room content chits on top of the room. The third layer will be similar to the second, only the squares will slightly larger to fit darkness tiles. These darkness tiles will be slightly larger in size than the room tiles (possibly 1/8-1/16"), and will sit in the darkness slots, effectively obscuring any rooms and room contents that are beneath it.

Now granted, this setup is still way more complicated than I'd like, but it seems like the only one that I'm capable of practically prototyping. If anyone has any better suggestions, please feel free to throw them out to me.

Thanks in advance.
-Darke

TheReluctantGeneral
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Wanted: Ideas for Unexplored Dungeon mechanic.

Darke - IMO what you are proposing seems significantly more complicated and expensive to prototype than the magnetic solution. I suspect my posts did not convey how simple, light, cheap and easy to work the magnetic materials are (you literally peel them off their backing plastic and stick them onto whatever you need having cut them with scissors or knife).

It may also be worth considering some hybrid scheme whereby only the counters/chits are magnetically affixed, if you have a good way of affixing room tiles and darkness tiles to the dungeon superstructure. This could make a magetic solution more feasible.

Also, the setup you outlined seems very vulnerable to slight knocks. In any case, it's up to your judgement of course but I'll be happy to provide more info on the magnetics via PM if you change your mind.

phpbbadmin
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Wanted: Ideas for Unexplored Dungeon mechanic.

TheReluctantGeneral wrote:
Darke - IMO what you are proposing seems significantly more complicated and expensive to prototype than the magnetic solution. I suspect my posts did not convey how simple, light, cheap and easy to work the magnetic materials are (you literally peel them off their backing plastic and stick them onto whatever you need having cut them with scissors or knife).

Hmmmm. I think we're going to have to agree to disagree about this. What happens with the magnetic solution when you flip the room tiles face down, yet some of them have chits underneath and some do not? Obviously these room tiles with chits underneath will be wobbly or at best, raised above those room tiles that don't have chits beneath them. Sure, you could put 'bluff' chits underneath those rooms that don't have anything in them, but I think that adds extra complexity. Also as far being more expensive, $6 per A4 sheet is through the roof expensive!!!! All I'm talking about is some sheets of chipboard, which is not hugely expensive.

Quote:
It may also be worth considering some hybrid scheme whereby only the counters/chits are magnetically affixed, if you have a good way of affixing room tiles and darkness tiles to the dungeon superstructure. This could make a magetic solution more feasible.

Again, I'm just not sold on the magnetic solution - and it's not that I don't understand it. My son has a little magnetic playset that uses what you are suggesting (kind of like a magnetic version of colorforms). It's a great idea, and I think it could work great with board games, I just don't think it's necessarily best for my game.

Quote:
Also, the setup you outlined seems very vulnerable to slight knocks. In any case, it's up to your judgement of course but I'll be happy to provide more info on the magnetics via PM if you change your mind.

I disagree with this. I don't think this setup will be prone to nudging any more than any other board game. In contrast, I think it would be less prone, due to the fact that the room tiles and the contents of the room will sit in the room tile 'trays'. These trays will hold everything in quite nicely, I presume.

Thanks for your input. Please don't take it personally, I just don't think the magnetic solution is the way to go for me.

-Darke

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