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What do you look for in a game?

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radioactivemouse
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Many of us are designers because we love games...heck, ALL of us are designers because we love games.

But as designers, we are still fans. We still buy games even though we may not have room in our houses, we still look for new game designs to inspire us, and we love playing games at meetups and get togethers.

But what do yo look for in a game? There are...thousands of games out there, but there are games that certainly catch our eye.

What catches your eye? I apologize if this topic has been done before, but maybe we need to keep asking ourselves that question so that somehow we can make the games that others will want to play.

For me, I look for games that are unique. It may be the subject matter, its value as a game, or a very unique game mechanic.

Many times I look for games that answer the question, "I would like a game like X, but fixes Y problem". I got Ascension because I wanted a game like Dominion, but with a faster setup time. I got Two Rooms and A Boom because I wanted a party game that didn't have the elimination factor that Werewolf has and could accommodate large numbers of players.

I got games solely on its game mechanics. I got 7 Wonders because of its (unique at the time) drafting mechanic. I got Codenames because the mechanic was so simple but elegant. I just got Heroes Wanted from GenCon because the hero randomization generator was amazing to me.

Sometimes it's because of the subject matter. I got Game of Thrones LCG because of that. I got Roll for the Galaxy because I love Race for the Galaxy.

What do you look for in a game?

let-off studios
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My Current Criteria

At this point in time, I'm of relatively limited means and have very little space to call my own. I end up spending more money on my own prototypes and components to make more games than I do published titles. This modifies my criteria for games these days:

- Affordable. I have a rough monthly budget for games (both published titles and game bits) that's around $30. Some months it's more, but more often it's less.

- Compact. I've been finding smaller games for like $10 - $20 that come in small boxes or those in-vogue metal canisters. All the components can fit in my shoulder bag, and I can even take two or more with me when I travel on my bicycle. I have limited shelf space where I live, so I will frequently repackage a game into a clear plastic bag (or several small plastic bags in a 1-gallon clear plastic bag, for example) so it more efficiently packs.

- Dramatic. Regardless of what I play, I'd prefer to see some sort of immediate effect of what's been done, whatever choice has been made, and clear shifts in the game state after a decision point. To be plain: I want a game that delivers a "quick punch." Pretty much any game I play these days when I'm not testing will be done in less than an hour.

EXAMPLE GAMES

Incan Gold is at the top of the list right now. It plays up to 8 players, takes up very little space, and has immense entertainment and replay value. I host game events at a pub twice a month and since it's such an easy game to teach I can introduce it to new attendees very quickly, and help them warm up to a group of fellow guests.

Aztack is a clever tile-stacking game that has a pleasant tactile sensation like playing dominoes, but it's also colorful and compact.

Little Devils is another recent acquisition that's easy to teach others because it has similar mechanics to Spades and/or Hearts. It's the same size as a normal deck of cards.

I'd be remiss if I didn't mention the Pocket Sports dice games. :) Affordable price, very quick and satisfying, and everything needed literally fits in your pocket. I can attract a small crowd with these games and have an audience that's entertained almost as much as I am.

I would likely pick up a copy of Splendor if the price was right. A definite candidate for repackaging into a bag half the size of the box. I'd also consider 7 Wonders, though I've not found it for a very affordable price.

I do have two notable exceptions: I still have the original Thunderstone deck-builder and three of its expansions in the same box (I play this solo almost exclusively), and I'll never rid myself of Agricola.

I've played impressively large games such as BattleStar Galactica, Eclipse, and even Twilight Imperium, but for me the payoff on those comes a bit too late in the game to be satisfying. That, and they take up too much space and are too expensive for me to consider these days.

adversitygames
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I like ameritrash

I like ameritrash
I like strongly themed games
I very much like resource management games
I like deck builder games quite a bit (I prototyped and playtested a new game idea yesterday which has deck building, seems promising)
I also really like industry games where you build an infrastructure and make your wealth grow (Age of Industry and Agricola are great).
I like deep strategies, and lots of different ways to victory

Thematically I generally like: sci-fi, cyberpunk, dark settings, horror, zombies. I'll go for fantasy-themed occasionally, but it's not my general preference.

One of my favourite games is Eclipse. It's got combat, resource management, dice, explosions, aliens, industry, space ships, ship design. Lots of stuff I like.

andymakespasta
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Nice thread. I like lying and

Nice thread.

I like lying and bluffing and making deals.
Stuff like "diplomacy" and "get bit" are the purest examples.
I don't mind complicated rules and mechanics, but they have to facilitate interaction.

Eurogames that focus on planning and resource management just turns me off. Even though Catan has a lot of resource management, the player interaction makes it a good game in my book.

questccg
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I like "card" games

Ever since I was little I was into collecting cards. I used to go from one corner store to another to try to collect all 100 cards from the "E.T." movie! I had Indiana Jones cards and later X-Files (from the T.V. series).

Later on it became "Star Trek: CCG". I even managed to get 2 "Jean-Luc Picard" rare/chase cards...

Also I would go to small stores and just buy up leftovers like "Legend Of The Five Rings", "Blood Wars", "Vampire: The Eternal Struggle (AKA Jyhad)". They were just left overs and I like the artwork and they were real cheap (like $1.00 a pack) so buying 20 packs only cost $20.00!

I had a friend who was into Magic: The Gathering. But not me. He loved the game because of the beautiful artwork...

My first self-published game was a card game for kids entitled "Quest Adventure Cards(tm)"... And my second game is a Deck-Builder entitled "Tradewars - Homeworld".

As you can see I really like cards. It might also stem from the fact that I love my family and when I was younger, we used to play Rumoli for HOURS on Saturday nights...

So yeah - I might have some board game ideas - but for the moment I'm still focusing on "card games"!

radioactivemouse
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questccg wrote:Ever since I

questccg wrote:
Ever since I was little I was into collecting cards. I used to go from one corner store to another to try to collect all 100 cards from the "E.T." movie! I had Indiana Jones cards and later X-Files (from the T.V. series).

Later on it became "Star Trek: CCG". I even managed to get 2 "Jean-Luc Picard" rare/chase cards...

Also I would go to small stores and just buy up leftovers like "Legend Of The Five Rings", "Blood Wars", "Vampire: The Eternal Struggle (AKA Jyhad)". They were just left overs and I like the artwork and they were real cheap (like $1.00 a pack) so buying 20 packs only cost $20.00!

I had a friend who was into Magic: The Gathering. But not me. He loved the game because of the beautiful artwork...

My first self-published game was a card game for kids entitled "Quest Adventure Cards(tm)"... And my second game is a Deck-Builder entitled "Tradewars - Homeworld".

As you can see I really like cards. It might also stem from the fact that I love my family and when I was younger, we used to play Rumoli for HOURS on Saturday nights...

So yeah - I might have some board game ideas - but for the moment I'm still focusing on "card games"!

Oh man, I love card games. It's just so hard cause many card games ran on the random booster method...it sucked so much money out of me.

But like you said, it was the past that kept me going. I played Magic: The Gathering in the early 90's with my roommates so much that I look for those times again...the fun of building your own deck and just throwing caution to the wind on a deck you just built.

But with the advent of deck building and LCG's, it's easier to get my card fix without feeling like i have to dump hundreds of dollars looking for a card I won't find.

That's why I've created my own card game. It's personal dream of mine and I never thought I could...but I'm pleasantly surprised that I could!

I got way too many card games now...

Jarec
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I have two things I find

Edit: I love how all the answers here have been pretty much all different, and here is one different to the bunch!

I have two things I find myself seaching BGG for:

1. Strong theme - Like with every piece of entertainment I tend to gravitate towards the mystical and outlandish stuff. My favorite game, Arkham Horror, is pretty much the same game than Pandemic is, albeit less streamlined (therefor harder to play). But the setting of Lovecraft's stuff is why I only own and adore Arkham Horror and not the latter.

2. Variable player powers - as it is tagged in BGG, usually found in co-op games. I just love the D&D mentality of specialized roles in teams. It just feels so good to be the rogue in team of burly bruisers who can't even get around a door knob.

One thing I weirdly avoid are game that operate just by cards. I have nothing against card games and love them equally, IF someone just forces me to try one and explains it to me.
Many a time while browsing BGG I've found thematically cool game, with the right tags, but the first picture shows a bunch of cards. Makes me just to skim over it.
Maybe it's because I've always been a wargamer, and need my non-abstract player models and boards.

questccg
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radioactivemouse wrote:...But

radioactivemouse wrote:
...But with the advent of deck building and LCG's, it's easier to get my card fix without feeling like i have to dump hundreds of dollars looking for a card I won't find...

Well it's true that cost-wise these card games are LESS expensive. So I am trying to use the LCG model to design a "base game" and then add "expansions" to the mix. I actually reduced the number of cards from "Tradewars - Homeworld" just because I could not afford to make all the artwork for the game... We're all limited in some way (financially) to develop the game as we would want it to be - and we need to compromise and understand what the game "needs" to be.

BUT I can't keep from thinking that "Quest AC 2" could be some EPIC game with a whole new twist on "storytelling". ;)

wombat929
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Strong theme, with

Strong theme, with interesting choices to make.

Fits a niche not already occupied by a favorite. I try not to buy too many games that do the same thing as another game I already have.

Family friendly. I have a lot of games I already can't play because my non-family game time is limited. So Family friendly games work better for me.

Dralius
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My name on the cover! But

My name on the cover!

But seriously I prefer games that are elegant and easy to learn but still have depth and replayability. A bit of novelty is also good whether it be the theme or the mechanics.

limalima
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I was initially about fantasy

I was initially about fantasy games but have lately in the past year been aiming at sci-fi and some intro Euro games.

Most recently I have been getting more family friendly games and tend to gravitate to those lately. My daughter is my main gaming partner who like all sorts of games but lately my wife has been getting into games so ease of play has been a big selling point for me.

Arthur Wohlwill
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Re; What do you look for in a game?

Those criteria area also very important to me. (I also like bidding in a game).
What new games do you think best fit your wants? Splendor might, though it is not very deep....

The Professor
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Game Attraction

Great post!

Despite my connection to war games over the past 30 years, the designer board game realm is still relatively new to me (~7 years).

My collection, while not vast, is specific to what I deem as the "best" exemplars of a particular mechanic or category, as there are a finite number of them. Cost is not so much a factor, as games from established companies or from Kickstarter generally remain in the $50-$75 range. I enjoy solo play, but I also need games for our bi-weekly Game Nights for 3-6 people.

To that end, I'll describe what I've found based on that attraction criteria and what I still need to find...

Deck-Builder/Resource Management: Ryan Laukat's City of Iron hits the spot for me as a game which has a 90-min game-time, with enough choices to make it interesting. The theme is somewhat whimsical, but overall the idea of building multiple deck-types (Citizens and Military) make it a very attractive option.

Other Deck-Builders that will never see space on my shelf include Magic: The Gathering nor Dominion . For MTG , I'm a 30+ year role-player and it doesn't capture my imagination. For Dominion, it's far too bloated.

Traitor Mechanic: Far and away, Days of Wonder's Shadow's Over Camelot works extremely well. While one can argue that there are more clever ways to resolve problems instead of 'hands of cards~rummy-style' the Traitor Mechanic remains, at its core, the part that will keep you on the edge of your seat for most of the game, and then once exposed keeps the tension quite high. Admittedly, if you can only get three people around the table, playing without the Traitor Mechanic allows for a fun few hours of play, as well.

Another Traitor Mechanic driven game, Battlestar Galactica looks great but you need to play with it, as it doesn't offer the option of playing without it.

Cooperative Play: Hands down, this goes to FFG's Arkham Horror ! With more than 150 plays since 2009, this game has it all...while it certainly exceeds most players' time-frame, this one has another exciting facet, namely Variable Player Powers. I've not found another co-op game which delivers in the way Arkham Horror does and when you include the myriad expansions, it shall remain at #1 on my list for a very long time.

Worker Placement: Here's where theme matters for me, as I have several games that fall into this category, especially if one liberally defines Worker Placement. For a fantasy setting, it's Kingsburg , which, by my estimation must include the To Forge a Realm expansion to complete the game. Two others recently funded on Kickstarter include the Viking-themed game by Shem Phillips, Raiders of the North Sea and one that emulates the now out of print Pillars of the Earth game by Randy Rathert, The King's Abbey!

Area Control: In my #2 position, this game is difficult to define. While BGG identifies it as Area Control, it's a card-driven game, with an resource management/economic overlay. In my opinion, it's the most elegant of game designs I have yet to encounter...Troyes . It immediately entered my Top 10 list, and with a few dozen plays around the Gaming Table and a few more than a dozen at BoardGameArena, Troyes is a beautifully rendered game, with a die-roll mechanic which is absolutely splendid.

Civilization: For this Category, I have two games which serve me well. The first is Historia by Marco Pranza which, while it heavily abstracts resources to a few identical cubes, the pace is crisp, the use of Advisers and Wonders make for a great game which clocks-in at 90-120 minutes. The other, Nations by the Hakanssons and Rosens provides a much different feel, but gives you greater depth by the management of multiple resources as you traverse Antiquity, the Medieval period, the Renaissance, and Modern eras.

While Through the Ages has a strong following, the inability to play it solo and the time commitment to play it with others means it will never make it to the shelf.

4X: With over 50 titles at BGG which define themselves as 4X games, only a few really deliver...and of those I haven't found one that balances the 4X components or plays in a reasonable amount of time. Examples of the aforementioned include FFG''s Twilight Imperium, 3rd Edition (TI3) and Eclipse . Both make great use of Variable Player Powers, but they each suffer from multiple defects.

TI3 has some clever concepts, including the use of Action Cards to set the stage for strategic actions and a number of ships to make life interesting among the stars. Additionally, controlled planets provide a dual bonus for Influence and Resources. Unfortunately, a game requiring an all-day commitment will see almost no play on the Gaming Table, despite its epic nature. Additionally, the combat system dominates the game much more than any other aspect.

Eclipse, while more reasonable in its approach, is far too fiddly with more than 50 cubes and disks tracking everything from Money, Science, and Actions. The variability of available technology disallows deliberate development of one's abilities and I'm not personally enamored with hidden Victory Points.

However, a soon-to-be relaunched Kickstarter project entitled Tau Ceti by Mike and Stan Strickland seem to capture the right balance of eXploration through the use of a singular all-purpose star-ship by race; eXpansion by building docks/ports in neighboring sectors for the purpose of establishing trade; eXploitation through the various card decks which rely on the player's race to make effective use of their Skills; and eXtermination by debilitating an adversary's star-ship.

The games listed above form the majority of my games, as that which attracts me is the best of available options, vice a pallet of games which we'll play only a few times. As a play-tester for several companies, I definitely get my fill of various designers' ideas and interpretations. But, when it comes to the Gaming Table, life's too short to play bad games.

Happy Gaming!

Cheers,
Joe

UnBillEvilBill
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The Meta

I love the Metagame. I like to space out and wonder, "man, if they do this though, what do I do? How do I go into the game with the best chance of success?"

I love modular design. Hero Clix for example. You and your opponent could have the most different pieces in the world and you still get to play the same game with two different strategies that you cooked up at home (hello meta!), just to see if you outwitted them before the match started or if it's gonna be knock down drag out fight.

As you can tell, I also like the competition. Risk, Monopoly, those games are boring to me until I consider I'm playing against a person to knock them out and win.

I don't like elimination. Not cool to me for players 3 thru X to be sitting there waiting for me and some other person to finish up. Worse still to be players 3 thru X.

I like trading, and collecting. I do NOT like the after market. Forty bucks for one card? No thanks...

I like customization, and I like to feel like I'm drawn into a world. D&D would be my ultimate game if it weren't for the role playing. That's why I like video games. But they don't scratch the table top itch.

I also love accessories. Deck Boxes, card sleeves, all the trinkets that come with Munchkin, etc.

I know some of that sounds contradictory, but I live in that grey fog of nuance and particulars. In the end, a good game is a good game. It's hard to speak to the generalities, but I love trying!

adversitygames
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The Professor wrote:

The Professor wrote:
Other Deck-Builders that will never see space on my shelf include Magic: The Gathering nor Dominion . For MTG , I'm a 30+ year role-player and it doesn't capture my imagination. For Dominion, it's far too bloated.

(on a complete tangent)
So I've been coming across different attitudes towards what a deck-building game is. I thought that M:tG was not a deck-building game, since creating your deck is not part of the game mechanics that you do with other players (like Dominion, where you're competing for available cards). It's just something you do to prep for the game (or not, since you can use pre-built decks instead).

(I haven't played M:tG so mb I just don't know the actual gameplay mechanics...)

Also, I like your way of deciding which games to get.

let-off studios
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Excellent Thread

Fantastic write-up on your preferences, Professor!

Awesome to hear everyone's viewpoints, for sure. :)

radioactivemouse
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Deck Building

iamseph wrote:
The Professor wrote:
Other Deck-Builders that will never see space on my shelf include Magic: The Gathering nor Dominion . For MTG , I'm a 30+ year role-player and it doesn't capture my imagination. For Dominion, it's far too bloated.

(on a complete tangent)
So I've been coming across different attitudes towards what a deck-building game is. I thought that M:tG was not a deck-building game, since creating your deck is not part of the game mechanics that you do with other players (like Dominion, where you're competing for available cards). It's just something you do to prep for the game (or not, since you can use pre-built decks instead).

(I haven't played M:tG so mb I just don't know the actual gameplay mechanics...)

Also, I like your way of deciding which games to get.

I've also known M:tG to be NOT categorized as a deck building game, though I know a lot of the old Magic guard referred to the game AS a deck building game.

But time has obviously changed. With Dominion, the term "deck building" was redefined as a mechanic where you're building your deck as part of the game, not in between games (building your deck outside of the game).

Me? I'm of the old guard and still (every once in a blue moon) refer to M:tG as "deck building", but I now refer to them as "CCG" (Customizable Card Games).

The Professor
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Great Catch and Thanks!

iamseph,

Great point...other than calling a Collector Card Game or something to that effect, I was trying to use the best "board game" category...but, to be more precise, both MtG and City of Iron use Hand Management as a mechanic, so I would change my original post...if I could. Thanks for pointing it out!

let-off studios,

Thanks! I enjoy my day-job, but I absolutely love my avocation as a developer, co-designer, play-tester, and reviewer of games!

radioactivemouse,

You're probably from my generation, my friend. I could kick myself for not coming up with the idea of MtG, given my love of writing and my friend's exceptional ability at art.

Cheers,
Joe

Soulfinger
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The first thing that gets my

The first thing that gets my attention is a solidly constructed box with a linen finish, like the ones FFG produces. I prefer that it looks good on my shelf and holds up to wear. I'm actually more likely to buy games from the same manufacturer if the box sizes match up.

I'll admit that I am swayed by good cover art. I'd never buy a game by Flying Frog Productions, because I think their graphic design is just awful. Their photo model box illustrations make Asylum b-movie covers look artful. I will often buy a specific edition of a game for the artwork, quite possibly in addition to the copy that I actually play. For example, I prefer the second edition of Talisman because of Gary Chalk's illustrations or the GW printing of Chaos Marauders.

I am willing to pay more for quality components. I paint and game with miniatures, so there is cross-over appeal. I was massively disappointed by the quality of the figures, I pre-ordered Mansions of Madness to use the figures with my existing collection of old RAFM miniatures. I do appreciate little touches like the inclusion of baggies or pouches for components.

As much as I love to sit down and play a single game for a few hours with friends, I also really enjoy several 15-minute games of Thunder Road or Screaming Eagles. Quick games have really grown on me, particularly some of the vintage MB titles.

A lot of my games though, well, I bought them because I found them at a massive discount. These past few years, I've lived on a very small income, so it has been the only way for me to try new things. A lot of games that have failed commercially in some way really prove to be quite fun.

I realized at some point that I was buying games more for the potential fun that they represented than as something I would ever really have a chance to play. I'm too isolated these days. Now, I look mostly for games that I can play with my 9-year-old son. Since most of the kids his age are congenital idiots in our town, we tend toward 2 player games.

Zedrex
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This seems like a great

This seems like a great thread to put my first post here :)

I have a lot less time and budget for playing than I did 20 years ago. I was a mad D&D and RPG guy as a kid in the 70's/80's, spent my teens playing Car Wars and Illuminati and King Of The Table Top... discovered boardgames like Talisman and Space Hulk and Bloodbowl after leaving home which my friends and I would enjoy on Friday and Saturday nights. I was a hardcore tournament-competing Magic: The Gathering player before getting a mortgage and a life that prohibited this level of investment into games.

Now I'm older and have a very different lifestyle with extremely limited funds, I look for games with low-investment. By that I mean:

* I don't have to pay more than I would be able to justify to my wife or landlord to own it
* I don't have to dedicate a room of the house or a whole bookshelf for it and all of it's expansions
* It doesn't need an 18 hour session to play
* I or my friends won't need 2 hours to learn the rules or prepare

There's nothing better than enjoying drinks with friends over a fun game, but this excludes warhammer/role-playing/dry medieval historical games/things with a million components/anything that you'd need to be a hard core gamer to play. Most of my friends are not gamers and I can't boast having the time or resources to dedicate a lot to it either.

Introducing a board or card game to a night socialising with non-gamers is not easy, so I'm likely going to do it with something that looks fun or funny and is easy to just start playing. Too many rules, lots of set up or fiddly stuff around alcohol will mean my guests will either protest or gradually start to ignore it after only investing half their attention in the first place.

My wife got me "Chez Chtulhu" for Xmas and we've played a lot of that since. It's easy, it's funny and it's fun. "Man Bites Dog" meets the same needs and friends really get the concept instantly so there's no obstacles to play. "Munchkin" is pretty wicked but a minimum of three players means we need a visitor before we can play it properly. These are all games that people who don't consider themselves gamers can play and get a laugh out of and actually become gamers with

"Talisman" is easy to learn (I had all the expansions - gifted it all to the kids when they moved out) but anyone who's played it before tends to avoid it because while the first hour is fun it can drag on and on and on. There's nothing more rewarding than an in depth game but one that outstays it's welcome and goes on for longer than people are willing to play it is annoying. The fully pimped out Talisman is easy to learn and play but has too many fiddly bits and just isn't deep enough to sustain it's playing time

One of my big surprises was finding out that shorter games with the "just one more" quality are more likely to be a hit with my friends, especially if everyone gets a chuckle out of them, so that's the kind of thing I tend to look for. Simple, funny, encourages player interaction, easy to get into but with lots of twists.

My all-time favourite game? Illuminati :)

Zedrex
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Chaos Marauders! I had

Chaos Marauders! I had forgotten all about that wonderful game. We all enjoyed that one, loved the feeling of playing a Sneaky Git at the right time :)

connerdrake5757
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Strategic and Involved

I like games where there is a lot of strategy. I love winning knowing that I succeeded due to my intelligence and the correct execution of my strategy. However, I don't like games where there aren't a lot of choices. We've all played a game where the correct choice is always obvious, and while it is said to be a very strategic game, everyone makes the right choices and the winner is ultimately determined by luck. I'd much rather play a game where there are many choices and options to victory, and the starting conditions are always different, because they allow for complex, unique strategies for each player, and the player who implemented the best strategy always wins.

I also like games that are heavily themed, and where the mechanics match the theme. If it's a war game, I want to be able to move troops around and fight. If it's a building game, I want to be able to place my own buildings on a landscape.

A final thing I love about games is being able to see your choices yield a result, and fast enough to learn from it.

Stealthpike
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Something new

One of the things I look for the most is something new. I love Catan, but I don't want every game I own to be "catan, except with..." I live near a small college and I host Board Games there every Saturday, so it's really handy to have some serious games and some light-hearted games, some fast games and some long ones, some simple and some complicated, some card games, some board games. It also lets me expand my knowledge of game concepts and gives me more ideas for the games I'm trying to design. Lately, I've been looking for games that support at least 6 players because my tight-nit gaming group is usually 5 players, which rules out a lot of games unfortunately.

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