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Fluxuating market?

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Matt201
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Are there any existing mechanics/ones you have come up with yourself that deal with a fluxuating market?
i.e. buying and selling stock with profits/losses dependant upon cost per unit.

The only game I have played is "stockmarket" in which there is the slider in the middle of the board that moves up and down depending on the space landed on the board.

However, my board doesn't really allow for "spaces" that affect the market, and I was wondering how else it could be done.

and thoughts and ideas would be greatly appreciated. Thanks a lot
-Matt

ilSilvano
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Palmyra

I do not know if this may be useful for you, but if you can add a "market" with slots for the physical items, have a look at Reiner Knizia's PALMYRA, that implements the market in a very nice and easy way:

http://www.boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/146/buy-low-sell-high

suf
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Wealth of Nations relies

Wealth of Nations relies heavily on market fluctuation, but the market sliders take a lot of room. Mac Gerdts' The Princes of Machu Picchu and Navegador are good examples of markets that take less room on the game board, and so does Age of Industry. They're all very good implementations in my opinion. Another more complex systems is the one found in Planet Steam where you have two sliders per resource but I find that too complex for what it is. I'd start with something like The Princes of Machu Picchu where you buy and/or sell items directly to the market which is a small 4 by 4 price matrix with one column for each resource type.

Maaartin
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Saving space

suf wrote:
Wealth of Nations relies heavily on market fluctuation, but the market sliders take a lot of room.

Yes, but it's surely not necessary as this image shows. You could save half the space by simply making it more compact (and a bit ugly). You could save more with providing places for multiple cubes. You could compress it to a small ugly track in which the cubes would be laid side by side. This wouldn't leave enough space for all the numbers, but with slightly different rules there would be no need for that many numbers (e.g., the price changes after each 3 cubes only and the difference between selling and buying prices is fixed, so only a single price need to be printed; this might not work for Wealth of Nations but should impose no problem for a new game).

Matt201
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I think I've worked out a

I think I've worked out a pretty simple grid type thing to keep track of the price of each thing at any given time. What I'm now having trouble with is a way to have the track move up and down...

The board is a hex system and allows players to choose in which direction they want to move, and does not really allow for instructions on the spaces themselves to determine market value (i.e. if players can choose which spaces to land on [to a degree, depending on dice rolls], then they control market prices, which defeats the entire purpose of having one in the first place).

I was wondering if there are any ways to determine whether the track moves up/down and how far that don't rely on landing on spaces on the game board.

Grall Ritnos
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Joined: 02/07/2011
Alternate systems

I'm currently working on a design that faced this same quandary. The solution I settled on was a deck of cards, with each card influencing the price of a single commodity. I found that by balancing the positive and negative cards in the deck, but reshuffling the deck after about 75% of the cards are used, you have a system which self corrects for highs and lows, while still providing interesting price variance which helps replayability. With only 4 commodities, I reveal 5 cards per turn to help the market to feel rather dynamic (although in some cases, cards practically cancel each other out), but you could adjust this number based on the needs of your game.

Another option would be to roll a die for each commodity, with the results of the die changing based on the value of the commodity. So, if we assume a price range of 1-9, if the commodity price is 4-6, the die can swing the price equally in either direction. If the price is 2-3 or 7-8, the price adjustments are mildly adjusted to bring the price back to the center. If the price is 1 or 9, the result of the die will bring the price more firmly back toward the middle. If you have a grid you're tracking prices on, you could color code sections of the grid to show which set of die results players are referencing. I haven't tested this idea at all though.

Of course, neither of these systems take supply and demand into account at all. I decided to make this compromise for my game, since my market is primarily about buying resources at varying prices, and the market would have spiraled out of control. You could take one of these systems and add an element of additional adjustment (i.e. if 2 or more players sell this turn, price is -1), but my experience was that these type of tweaks felt a bit fiddly, at least for my game.

Thanks for the links above. I haven't investigated market mechanics in several months, so I might have to have a look to see if I might like to update a thing or two in my system. Happy designing!

Maaartin
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Matt201 wrote:I was wondering

Matt201 wrote:
I was wondering if there are any ways to determine whether the track moves up/down and how far that don't rely on landing on spaces on the game board.

I wonder if there's such a thing that does rely on landing on spaces on the game board. I know two systems

In any cases, the prices and the board are completely separated. Probably I'm misunderstanding you, but I'd suppose I'm not the only one.

wykcira
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Joined: 07/21/2011
You can look at executive

You can look at executive decision. The market is based on the supply and demand created by the players on their turn. No dice, no cubes, just numbers. The game is rather dry but it is another avenue to explore.

Brykovian
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I'm toying with a market idea

I'm toying with a market idea in a game where players produce resources and then sell them to a central market. There are "sell" phases where players that have delivered goods to a buyer can sell them at the current market price.

The pricing is a number from 0 to 6 and starts on 2 or 3 (not sure yet) ... for each unit sold up to that pricing number, the player gets 2 gold, and for each unit sold after that pricing number, the player gets 1 gold.

After the sell phase, for each player that sold a particular resource, that resource price number moves down 1. All resources that were not sold during the phase move up 1.

There are other things going on in the game beyond producing and delivering resources as well, and you have limited cargo carrying capacity ... I'm hoping to give some tension to deciding when you sell something -- wait for a better price, or sell now in order to free up cargo space and get what you can. Watching what the other players are producing and carrying should play a role as well.

-Matt

Grall Ritnos
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Joined: 02/07/2011
Variety of Resources

I like this idea as a simple representation of supply and demand. The trick will be to determine the correct number of resources to use, since its clearly easier to rapidly depress a price than it is to inflate it. If there are a good variety of resources available, the inflation mechanic will have the chance to fight back and keep things balanced. I'd be very interested to hear how this plays in testing.

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