Skip to Content

Would these mini articulated robot / mech be fun to play in board games ???

21 replies [Last post]
neurobota
Offline
Joined: 12/10/2014
Neurobota Unicorn 01.jpg
Neurobota series one 02.jpg
Neurobota Hammer 01.jpg
Neurobota series one 04.jpg
Neurobota cyclone 01.jpg
Neurobota Cyclone 02.jpg
Neurobota white 04.jpg
Neurobota series one 06_1.jpg
Neurobota white.jpg
Neurobota Unicorn vs a block.jpg

I have designed a series of mini articulated robot / mech with interchangeable body parts and, they stands 2 - 5 cm tall, consisting 20 - 100 parts forming complex universal mechanical joint and interchangeable arms, legs, pelvis, foot, weapons and attachment. You can take off the arm leg pelvis weapon or the whole upper or lower body and change it with the other robot / mech create unique and interesting combination.

I have little experience in playing board game, my friend suggest they could be fun to play as a character in game. I figure the best way to find out is to ask opinion from game designers and players. So any feedback are welcome.

Here are some photos, they called Neurobota

nomad
Offline
Joined: 11/13/2014
Nice Work!

Heck yeah they can work in a board game. PM me for some suggestions and ideas.

Oh, and welcome.
-nomad-

X3M
X3M's picture
Offline
Joined: 10/28/2013
I have to say...

They look awesome!

What did you use? 3D printer or molds?

larienna
larienna's picture
Offline
Joined: 07/28/2008
That is Awesome! You just

That is Awesome! You just created and amazing toy similar to legos.

I know that there is a lego mecha game out there on BGG, search for lego in the bgg pictures and you'll stumble on them.

Maybe you can reuse the same mechanic system.

Here it is:

http://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/25045/mechaton-giant-fighty-robots

Canyoncl
Canyoncl's picture
Offline
Joined: 06/05/2014
Reply

Short answer: YES

Long answer: YES!!!!!!!! (With a lot more ! points!!!)

Those look awesome, The only real problem I have with making stuff is that my graphic design is lacking. A lot. (Although I can make good looking cards from stock images, but that is the extent). I would reccomend building a small demo game of sorts and seeing if it is fun! That is what I did and now I am designing a full 4X space game!

neurobota
Offline
Joined: 12/10/2014
They are made with 3d

They are made with 3d printing

neurobota
Offline
Joined: 12/10/2014
larienna wrote:That is

larienna wrote:
That is Awesome! You just created and amazing toy similar to legos.

I know that there is a lego mecha game out there on BGG, search for lego in the bgg pictures and you'll stumble on them.

Maybe you can reuse the same mechanic system.

Here it is:

http://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/25045/mechaton-giant-fighty-robots

Thanks for your suggestion, I will check that out.

lewpuls
lewpuls's picture
Offline
Joined: 04/04/2009
Impractical for most purposes

As a practical matter, neat as these seem to be, anything with that many assembly parts isn't practical for a commercial board game, except in a small niche.

(But it might appeal to the same sorts of people who spend vast sums on Warhammer minis.)

JTAshby
Offline
Joined: 12/07/2014
Even without using them in a game...

I would buy some of these just to have around, they look really neat!

As for their practicality in a game, I'll have to agree with others that there might just be too many parts to be feasible except in a tabletop miniatures-style game, unless they came preconstructed with most pieces fused together so that they won't get lost with use. The major body parts (head, torso, arms, legs) could still be interchangeable, but I don't think that the average gamer would want the stress of potentially losing one of 20+ pieces.

larienna
larienna's picture
Offline
Joined: 07/28/2008
As a practical matter,

Quote:
As a practical matter, neat as these seem to be, anything with that many assembly parts isn't practical for a commercial board game, except in a small niche.

I have to agree with this, if you want to have a game playable out of the box, then NO unless they are pre assembled.

If you want a game like mech warrior where an important part of the game is to simply design your mech, then YES.

But again, that might be a niche market. I think the best solution would be to accomodate both. Supply preassembled model playable out of the box ( maybe printed as 1 block, not modifiable except for weapons) and give the option to design your own mech by using detachable parts.

I would go further, make bigger models and sell them as toys like if they were legos. There is enough assembly to be a "game" in itself.

thoughtfulmonkey
thoughtfulmonkey's picture
Offline
Joined: 12/04/2014
Great but niche

The type of game that they would be great for is something like Ronin Duels / Wars - where players could customise the weapons and equipment of their mechs. I think they mainly required you to glue bits on or use magnets though.

However, the creators (Cell Entertainment) went bankrupt, so that gives you an idea of how difficult a sell it might be.

If you did manage to get a distributor for shipping them as toys (like Zoids or Micro Blocks), then having some suggested game rules to go with them couldn't hurt.

neurobota
Offline
Joined: 12/10/2014
Canyoncl wrote:Short answer:

Canyoncl wrote:
Short answer: YES

Long answer: YES!!!!!!!! (With a lot more ! points!!!)

Those look awesome, The only real problem I have with making stuff is that my graphic design is lacking. A lot. (Although I can make good looking cards from stock images, but that is the extent). I would reccomend building a small demo game of sorts and seeing if it is fun! That is what I did and now I am designing a full 4X space game!

Thanks for your suggestion, I thinks so, maybe start from a simply prototype demo and see how it goes.

neurobota
Offline
Joined: 12/10/2014
lewpuls wrote:As a practical

lewpuls wrote:
As a practical matter, neat as these seem to be, anything with that many assembly parts isn't practical for a commercial board game, except in a small niche.

(But it might appeal to the same sorts of people who spend vast sums on Warhammer minis.)

This is a great point, I will keep that in mind for future design, maybe have two versions, one as piece, and one as a whole.

Zag24
Offline
Joined: 03/02/2014
You haven't given the

You haven't given the critical piece of information, which is how much would it cost to make them in bulk. I suspect that the answer is that they would be somewhere north of $1 per robot, but I honestly have no idea. That would mean that a game can't really afford to have more than a few of them and expect to sell for a profit, which really cuts down on the value of the limbs being interchangeable.

Here's a place you might shop them: Go to kickstarter and find people making games involving robots. Ask them if they would like to offer a set of these as a bonus for larger donations.

larienna
larienna's picture
Offline
Joined: 07/28/2008
The problem with games with

The problem with games with mini is always the price. They are expensive. I have seen a few mini games lately, not sure of the name, but none of them is under 100$.

It now depends on the game, if you can have a playable game with enough parts to build up like 5-6 robot, it could reduce your cost. But if you need 30+ mini, it will be expensive. Another idea is that if for example, your robots are fighting tanks and planes instead of other robots, those mini could be cheaper or simply be cardboard tokens since they are not customizable.

If you are going the toy route (which I strongly suggest), then having enough pieces to make 1 or 2 robot is more than enough.

questccg
questccg's picture
Offline
Joined: 04/16/2011
Risk Legacy!

One idea that I had was "Risk Legacy": http://www.boardgamegeek.com/image/1196938/risk-legacy

The premise of the game is that if you "Destroy" a card, it is permanently removed from the game by "tearing"/"ripping" it up!

Now I'm not saying your concept aids this - BUT in a way if you SHOOT off a Robot's hand, you simply "remove" the part. Or if it's a arm hit, you "remove" the ENTIRE arm...

This form of "destruction" lends well to the "Risk Legacy" concept - even BETTER than destroying cards. I mean *seriously*: you want us to ruin a perfectly good game?!

However in the case of destroying MECHs this makes more sense... And the mechs can be like the Terminator 1000 - they keep on coming unless there is a "head shot"... or something like this.

But disassembling parts of your army seems like something MORE realistic!

questccg
questccg's picture
Offline
Joined: 04/16/2011
Assembly required

If you can design "Lego" documents to document how to assemble pieces, this would be a better game concept.

Some ideas are:

  • Include a NUMBER under each piece. Like the hand is Piece #12.
  • Then in your GAME refer to cards which say "Destroyed Arm [12]".
  • Then the player can choose either the right or left arm...

These are just some *small* ideas. BUT if you had assembly instruction with numbers it might be more possible to "play" with these especially if we have the "destroy" concept where pieces get removed and need to be "restored"!

I must say the robots - look *kewl*. But assembly needs to be rather QUICK and easy (follow the steps), if you want this to be a TOY or used in a GAME...

questccg
questccg's picture
Offline
Joined: 04/16/2011
Sales ideas

I would aim for something like "2 Player" game sets. Like the Unicorn Mech, maybe you could include two (2) of these one for each side...

Or you could have a set of four (4) of different robots, sold for one (1) player. If players want to play two (2) players - each player would need to buy a set...

As miniatures, I would go the set route - whichever you prefer.

But in a table-top game - it might be hard to incorporate since most wargames don't have the "interchangeable" option. BUT your minis bring something NEW and FRESH... Maybe somebody wants to design a Mech Game around your minis...!

neurobota
Offline
Joined: 12/10/2014
cost

They are much more expensive to produce than the conventional production method. I am currently designing smaller mechs within the $1 to $2 price range, and their body parts are still compatible with larger mechs.

I also believe kickstarter is the way to go.

neurobota
Offline
Joined: 12/10/2014
toy

That is great idea of cutting the cost. In this case, only 2 mech will be needed for a starter game.

My initial idea of creating Neurobota is to make them into toy as well as in game character. I am going to take them to the toy show this March in Melbourne, hopefully find some distributors for them. Making a game around them will be the next goal, if everything goes well.

neurobota
Offline
Joined: 12/10/2014
removeable parts

Great idea!

I believe this can be achieved with mech made with interchangeable body parts. If one is damaged in the battle field, you can simply remove the part to reflect the damaging effect. You can also put the part back on after being repaired. Opponent's parts/weapons can also be captured and used to enhanced your mech.

neurobota
Offline
Joined: 12/10/2014
Assembling

questccg wrote:
If you can design "Lego" documents to document how to assemble pieces, this would be a better game concept.

Some ideas are:

  • Include a NUMBER under each piece. Like the hand is Piece #12.
  • Then in your GAME refer to cards which say "Destroyed Arm [12]".
  • Then the player can choose either the right or left arm...

These are just some *small* ideas. BUT if you had assembly instruction with numbers it might be more possible to "play" with these especially if we have the "destroy" concept where pieces get removed and need to be "restored"!

I must say the robots - look *kewl*. But assembly needs to be rather QUICK and easy (follow the steps), if you want this to be a TOY or used in a GAME...

You just gave me some great ideas to make it playable! I will certainly add numbers or names for each body part and weapon.

Here is one of my previous lego like step by step assembling diagrams:

http://www.pinterest.com/pin/536421005591686976/

Following the instruction, this mech can be assembled in just few minutes. Here is a video showing the assembling process in one minute:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QdW0FCZhllA

I agree, the assembling need to be quick and easy.

Syndicate content


forum | by Dr. Radut