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How I made my plastic parts for Noblemen

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Xaqery
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Joined: 07/26/2008

Because I was asked to write an article about this here it is:
http://noblemenboardgame.blogspot.com/2008/08/i-have-been-asked-to-expla...

- Dwight

tdishman
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Joined: 08/05/2008
Sweet demo! Out of

Sweet demo!

Out of curiosity, once the Sculpey is baked, can it be sanded, or otherwise textured with a Dremel tool? I have no idea what that material is like once hardened.

Also, what about inserting toothpicks into the molds as you're pouring. Would that work to help pull them out? You could then break them off and sand down any remaining wood.

Xaqery
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Joined: 07/26/2008
It can be sanded and

It can be sanded and dremeled. I tried that alittle here:
http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_zw102PTSjiE/SJodq9B22UI/AAAAAAAAAM0/z1GYp98U3b...

The toothpicks would be a good idea to try.

Thanks.

- Dwight

Phookadude
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Joined: 11/03/2008
A few tips for rtv/resin sculpy

I have done this a few times.
First tip is the rtv kits and resin can be bought at the big hobby stores (hobby lobby) and they often have 40% coupons online wich makes this reasonably priced.

When making sculpy peices I usually use something else, a piece of wood, a washer or cardboard to make the stand. Also using paper and other materiels can give you great results if youre not the best sculptor. I made a two-headed turtle monster (for monsters menace america) using carboard for the base, in order to get a nice hex, and index paper scales glazed with white glue. Lots of great detail can be achived. Anything can be used, I made a ufo out of a button and a soft-air bb with a paper tail fin and toothpick tip antenna, looked great after it was cast.

I tend to use 2-part moulds for most things. This gives you control of undercuts wich will weaken the mould after a few castings.

Lots of demos for this online.

If you need allot of peices the cost of the plastic resin can get high, the cheepest solution I have found is polyesther resin that is meant for fibreglass repairs and can be found in automotive departments. If you use polyester you have to use a mould release agent but most paint works fine, so you paint your mould, pour the plastic and you get the paint bonded to the plastic. This stuff is more resilent but takes longer to cure and is a bit more tricky to use.

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