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Colors

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boardgameguru
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I see a lot of red art colors for Party games boxes etc.

Is this the best color?

Has any research been done about colors for Party board games bestsellers?

Thanks great designers

BHFuturist
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Color is powerful

The effects of color on the mind and how it shapes our reactions is a very large and deep topic. It does relate to games and gaming, and it is a topic that I think about as a hobbyist designer. A lot of research into the effects of color have been done, but I am not aware of any study that has linked the color red directly to the sales of party games.

That would make for some interesting research. Here are some articles to get you started on the psychological effects of color if you are interested:

http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fpsyg.2015.00368/full

http://www.colorpsychology.org/red/

http://www.colour-affects.co.uk/psychological-properties-of-colours

I hope this helps,

@BHFuturist

boardgameguru
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BHFuturist wrote:The effects

BHFuturist wrote:
The effects of color on the mind and how it shapes our reactions is a very large and deep topic. It does relate to games and gaming, and it is a topic that I think about as a hobbyist designer. A lot of research into the effects of color have been done, but I am not aware of any study that has linked the color red directly to the sales of party games.

That would make for some interesting research. Here are some articles to get you started on the psychological effects of color if you are interested:

http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fpsyg.2015.00368/full

http://www.colorpsychology.org/red/

http://www.colour-affects.co.uk/psychological-properties-of-colours

I hope this helps,

@BHFuturist

Great help thanks

I Will Never Gr...
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Google "Marketing and Colors" ..

It's pretty interesting the way color can influence peoples thoughts before they've even read or inspected a product or business.

From some of the topics on the psychology of color related to marketing;

Red – Creates a sense of urgency, which is good for clearance sales. Encourages appetite, thus is frequently used by fast-food chains. Physically stimulates the body, raising blood pressure and heart rate, associated with movement, excitement, and passion.

Blue – The preferred color of men. It’s associated with peace, water, tranquility, and reliability. Blue provides a sense of security, curbs appetite, and stimulates productivity. The most common color used by conservative brands looking to promote trust in their products.

Green – Associated with health, tranquility, power, and nature. Used in stores to relax customers and for promoting environmental issues. Green stimulates harmony in your brain and encourages a balance leading to decisiveness.

Purple – Commonly associated with royalty, wisdom, and respect. Stimulates problem solving as well as creativity. Frequently used to promote beauty and anti-aging products.

Orange & Yellow – Cheerful colors that promote optimism. Yellow can make babies cry, while orange can trigger a sense of caution. Used to create a sense of anxiety that can draw in impulsive buyers and window shoppers.

Black – Associated with authority, power, stability, and strength. Often a symbol of intelligence, but can become overwhelming if used to frequently.

Grey – Symbolizes feelings of practicality, old age, and solidarity. But too much grey can lead to feelings of nothingness and depression.

White – Associated with feelings of purity, cleanliness and safety. Can be used to project an absence of color or neutrality. White space helps spark creativity since it can be perceived as an unaltered, clean state.

radioactivemouse
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Colors

boardgameguru wrote:
I see a lot of red art colors for Party games boxes etc.

Is this the best color?

Has any research been done about colors for Party board games bestsellers?

Thanks great designers

Like others have said, color plays an important part in game design...a lot more than people think.

So pick your colors wisely. Many times choosing a color can actually give you a direction on where you want that faction/character/NPC/whatever to go.

So you shouldn't really ask, "Is this the best color?"

Rather you should ask yourself, "Is this the best color for my game?"

Only you can answer that question.

lewpuls
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Be aware, in different

Be aware, in different countries the "meaning" of colors can change quite a bit. US tends to associate "yellow" with cowardice. Not at all true in France, I understand.

In other words, color meaning is at least partly learned rather than inherent.

Willem Verheij
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When it comes to the game

When it comes to the game box, I feel it's most important to have it stand out in some way, so that it will catch someone's attention if they look past a shelf.

It can help to get people to walk over and see what that eye catching box is all about.

Personally I loathe false advertisement though.. some games have beautifull box art that makes me exited to see what the game might look like and I pick it up and turn over the box.. and see a very simplistic board with some basic pawns and undetailed cards.
Naturally not everyone cares for how a game looks, but it's sending kind of a mixed message if the box art looks like a lavish renaissance painting and the game itself looks very simplistic.

JamJam52
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Joined: 03/20/2016
Agree!

Yea false advertising is annoying, but for me its when a game has been incorrectly skinned (not themed). Not sure what the correct term is but it happened to me the other day with Santorini. It looked like an ok game but I found I wasn't that interested because it looks a little childish and I was looking for a more in depth game. Looking into it a bit more and its apparently a highly acclaimed abstract strategy game I am now really interested to play. Had it looked a bit more sophisticated I would have been interested sooner. I guess its a marketing thing but to me the type of game it is and the feel of it doesn't match...

Interesting thought, whats more important styling the game to be most attractive to the desired market or to best reflect the game itself?

Willem Verheij
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Why not both? If the false

Why not both?

If the false advertisement is already obvious when looking at the back of the box to see what the game looks like, it will only work against the game unless people already know of the game and how it plays.

If the theme is light, it might be better to keep the game box a bit more abstract as well, but still eye catching.

SuperTooned
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It doesn't matter

It really doesn't matter what color you choose. It's whatever you think will look good for your game. Don't let people tell you what color to choose.

Good Luck ;)

-Tooned

radioactivemouse
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really?

SuperTooned wrote:
It really doesn't matter what color you choose. It's whatever you think will look good for your game. Don't let people tell you what color to choose.

Good Luck ;)

-Tooned

What makes you think that we were telling him what colors to choose? We weren't.

This thread was all about effective use of color...whole different ballgame.

But to respond formally to your post, it DOES matter what color is chosen. If you start replacing all the black with pink in a Star Wars game and it will have a totally different feel than before.

There's a strong psychology to using color effectively and, if used right, can really enhance a game design.

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