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Kickstarter *Marketing*

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questccg
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Hi all,

I was wondering if other BGDF members might be able to help in terms of *Marketing* a Kickstarter campaign.

Aside from creating the campaign and announcing it to the BGDF community and maybe posting something on BGG... Does anyone have any ideas how to market a Kickstarter campaign...

I was wondering where I might be able to further *Advertise* the Kickstarter campaign... Are there other websites to market the game on? Is there any place where I could pay for banner ad space???

Many thanks for your input.

Stormyknight1976
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Ad space.

Try out these sites. Rpg.net. And Gamedev.net. On rpg.net they have a link to rpg drive thru. That site is for the hard to find and out of date or stock rpg games from the 70's 80's and maybe 90's.

abdantas
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you might want to also do a

you might want to also do a paid preview from Tom Vasel on The Dice Tower. Loads of people check him out pretty often.

Dralius
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http://www.facebook.com/#!/gr

http://www.facebook.com/#!/groups/138469072961355/

Is the Kickstarter best practices group. There is both fresh ideas and experience there.

TwentyPercent
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RE: Kickstarter *Marketing*

Don't forget to spread the word locally. Friends and family are some of the best resources you have, as they will be willing to work the most to help you. Also, consider talking to local comic book, hobby, and game stores about your Kickstarter Campaign and your game. Maybe they'll let you put an ad in their shop and/or website/social media. Additionally, you may find new locals interested in checking out your game.

Online is a great resource, but it's also the most impersonal. Reaching out to your local community can have the greatest impact and is the best way to connect with people on the most personal level.

Good luck!
20%

questccg
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Local promotion vs Online

TwentyPercent wrote:
Don't forget to spread the word locally. Friends and family are some of the best resources you have, as they will be willing to work the most to help you.

Well the Kickstarter campaign is for US citizens only. I am only shipping to the USA. As such local promotion with friends and family isn't very useful.

TwentyPercent wrote:
Also, consider talking to local comic book, hobby, and game stores about your Kickstarter Campaign and your game. Maybe they'll let you put an ad in their shop and/or website/social media. Additionally, you may find new locals interested in checking out your game.

Again, I am hoping to get the attention of gamers in the USA. Our campaign manager lives in NY NY. The other thing is the prototype is very basic (just cards with writing on them). Not very attractive.

TwentyPercent wrote:
Online is a great resource, but it's also the most impersonal. Reaching out to your local community can have the greatest impact and is the best way to connect with people on the most personal level.

Impersonal or not, my goal is to try to attract sufficient visitors to my Kickstarter web page. Most of these visitors should be from the US and a good portion of them should be gamers, or people who like card games. The other, more costly reward, is people who are looking for a personal experience (unique)...

Man is it just me or advertising on the Internet has become *difficult*. Sites used to have banners to advertise, not many banners around anymore...

TwentyPercent
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RE: Local vs Online

I have never done any online advertising, but I'd think it has always been difficult. Banners may not be popular anymore b/c they were not effective. If they were effective, they'd probably still be around and a popular means of advertising.

I didn't realize you were not in the US. Obviously you have to campaign within your means, but if you have a manager in the States, maybe he can help advertise locally. Don't just write off the idea since you aren't local; try to think outside of the box.

You want people to visit your Kickstarter web page and that's exactly what my idea of promoting your game at a local level would do. To get visitor's, you need exposure, but having people visit your Kickstarter campaign requires effort on their behalf. Advertising face-to-face is more personal and is a more successful means to grab peoples' attention and have them want to visit your Kickstarter.

Do you think a random visitor on BGG wants to click a banner for a random Kickstarter project? Probably not. Now if you (or said manager) is at a hobby shop, talking with people, and showing off their game/ideas, you have a significantly greater chance to grab someone's attention. Sure it's more work and you have less audience, but it's all a trade-off.

Please don't take what I say the wrong way. I didn't take offense to what you said; just merely trying to elaborate my intent and help you think outside the box. Kickstarters are rarely successful, so the more methods and effort you put into it, the better your chances. And I want you to succeed. =)

questccg
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Random web visitor

TwentyPercent wrote:
Do you think a random visitor on BGG wants to click a banner for a random Kickstarter project? Probably not. Now if you (or said manager) is at a hobby shop, talking with people, and showing off their game/ideas, you have a significantly greater chance to grab someone's attention. Sure it's more work and you have less audience, but it's all a trade-off.

Well actually when I visit BGG and see a Kickstarter banner... I often click! Maybe it's just me, but I'm curious to know what is being funded on Kickstarter, especially in terms of tabletop games.

The problem I see is that my prototype is just cards with text... It is as if you need to have a finished product before going on Kickstarter. Or you need a review from the Dice Tower or Father Geek. If the game is just a prototype, I also don't see what the excitement would all be about. BUT if a product has its artwork and its nice game box, then I can see people getting excited (at least enough to want to fund/pre-order).

But the subject of this message is how to *market* a game on Kickstarter. So basically how to drive MORE traffic to your Kickstarter campaign.

TwentyPercent
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questccg wrote: But the

questccg wrote:
But the subject of this message is how to *market* a game on Kickstarter. So basically how to drive MORE traffic to your Kickstarter campaign.

Well, I gave my opinion. I personally think the best chance you have at getting a single individual to visit your Kickstarter page is to speak with them... in person... where they get to talk and interact with the game designer, as opposed to click on an advertisement. That level of engagement is going to have the most impact on them, and therefore have the best chance of them be willing to put for the time and effort to check out your Kickstart page. I understand your proximity prohibits that level of engagement from you, but depending on the roles, the manager can act as an your extension in terms of marketing. The best chance you have of making an influence on someone is face-to-face. People want to know their opinions and thoughts are heard, and that level of engagement could be what makes them go out and tell their friends, and their friends' friends, about the game.

Obviously, the online community has a significantly larger audience than the local game store, but it's also a significantly smaller percentage of people who are going to give a damn; so you are comparing apples to oranges.

Either way, I wish you luck and much success. I'm excited that a fellow designer is ready to take their project to the next level. I hope that my ideas gets to that level of completion.

abdantas
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I'm paying someone to do a

I'm paying someone to do a few cards. Maybe 1 of each type so that people can get what the artwork, but then im incorporating into the funding cost what it would take for me to recuperate that sum as well as to pay for the rest of the art to be finished. Good simple art, as long as you don't want someone spending hours and hours making something extremely intricate. Most artists that have worked on these kind of campaigns will do the original few artworks at a reduced cost in the idea that if the kickstarter is successful they will be getting much more work.

just food for thought.

questccg
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I love NY...

abdantas wrote:
I'm paying someone to do a few cards. Maybe 1 of each type so that people can get what the artwork, but then im incorporating into the funding cost what it would take for me to recuperate that sum as well as to pay for the rest of the art to be finished. Good simple art, as long as you don't want someone spending hours and hours making something extremely intricate. Most artists that have worked on these kind of campaigns will do the original few artworks at a reduced cost in the idea that if the kickstarter is successful they will be getting much more work.

I'm not really worried about the *artwork*. We have a very talented artist. I am going to try to get him to design a *centerpiece* for the campaign. Kinda like an advance on the artwork. One piece is not the end of the world and will not take months to complete.

Then I will share some of his other pieces of artwork on the campaign page (Conan the Barbarian, maybe a Dr. Strange... I don't know yet, we will see what he thinks is best).

I understand the idea of talking to people about the game (word of mouth). I will see if our campaign manager can get into some shops and advertise our game... (in New York city).

questccg
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Always challenges

TwentyPercent wrote:
Well, I gave my opinion. I personally think the best chance you have at getting a single individual to visit your Kickstarter page is to speak with them... in person... where they get to talk and interact with the game designer, as opposed to click on an advertisement. That level of engagement is going to have the most impact on them, and therefore have the best chance of them be willing to put for the time and effort to check out your Kickstart page.

There is another *challenge* we are facing. If we produce the Kickstarter campaign it is to produce our artwork and to sell some copies of the game to contributors. That's all fine... we can produce the game and send copies to the people who contributed (because we will use POD to satisfy those orders).

The problem comes when we suggest dealing with local game stores. See our product will be produced using POD and the profit margins are not very good. Our costs are TOO HIGH to be able to sell our game at a local game store. What that means is that our Kickstarter's goal is to get the artwork done and produce a *nice* prototype with that artwork and all. The next step from there is approaching a potential publisher and seeing if THEY can do something with the nice prototype (artwork and all).

Because of POD, it makes it that we can fulfill the orders of the Kickstarter but that we cannot SELL to retail locations.

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