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Need Kickstarter Advice

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Dralius
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Minion games is gearing up to produce my game Tahiti later this year and they want to start of with a Kickstarter campaign. For this I have been asked to make a video to introduce myself and demo the game.

I have plenty of experience demoing games in a live setting but have never had to work in front of a camera. I know quite a few people here have had success with kickstarter and was wondering if anyone had any advice.

BTW - the entry for Tahiti was just added to BGG today in case you wondering about it.

http://www.boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/118776/tahiti

Crifmer
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The Game Whisperer

Go here:

http://www.thegamewhisperer.com/

Richard Bliss does an excellent podcast with quite a lot of very helpful advice for utilizing Kickstarter. I'm gearing up for a campaign myself later this year and found his podcasts invaluable.

Crafty
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Hello! I found this list of

Hello! I found this list of links on the Board Game Geek forums when looking for advice as well. My own project (http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/684989390/proto-typical) is almost expired, but you should find this useful. =D

http://www.boardgamegeek.com/thread/718136/succeeding-with-kickstarter

- Crafty

PierreNZ
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Dralius wrote:I have plenty

Dralius wrote:
I have plenty of experience demoing games in a live setting but have never had to work in front of a camera.

In that case, i'd suggest organising some regular demos and having a friend of yours film it. So long as he/she can keep the camera steady (tripod is a must) then you'll get something that looks a lot more natural than you "working in front of the camera". Better still, organise three demos in a row (at least one new player for each session ... so you hae to go through everything), you'll forget about the camera in the background by demo #2 and get into your groove.
Then in the editing stage, in between the different phases of the game, i'd add the relevant diagrams for a clean view of what's going on.

My two cents ;-)

InvisibleJon
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Consider narration with pictures instead of video?

Dralius wrote:
I have plenty of experience demoing games in a live setting but have never had to work in front of a camera. I know quite a few people here have had success with kickstarter and was wondering if anyone had any advice.
We got in on Kickstarter early, so this advice may not apply any more.

The Project: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/dystopianholdings/inevitable-dystopi...

We opened with a friendly introduction with pictures of the two of us, and we narrated the entire video. We had no "live video" of us talking to the camera. In fact, we had no live video at all (lots of "Ken Burns effect" and thematically appropriate transitions). This made the video much easier to produce (the two of us live halfway across the USA from each other) and kept us from having to get a video camera or worry about "acting normal" for the camera.

Note that the video also is not a demo. It's more a "sales pitch" that highlights what's cool about the game and what our plans are. I've done a few (non-Kickstarter) videos where I perform the demo in front of the camera, then lay the narration over the video later. That keeps me from having to act and speak at the same time, and makes it easier to do everything correctly.

I hope it turns out well for you!

PlayCrossbones
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Voice Over

I tried the live presentation in a past project and found it very difficult to pull off an entire pitch without a lot of do-overs and final cut editing.

So, I would tend to concur with the suggestion for a voice over narration as opposed to the live demo presentation.

Give it a try and see what works for you...and try not to stay up too late.

Dralius
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Demo

InvisibleJon wrote:
Note that the video also is not a demo. It's more a "sales pitch" that highlights what's cool about the game and what our plans are.

My part is the demo which will help show why it’s cool and unique. My publisher will use the footage as part of the overall pitch that he is putting together.

genericm
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I'm not sure how you computer

I'm not sure how your computer skills fare, but for our kickstarter campaign I learned Flash animation. Its pretty easy to learn! I would say after a few tutorials you could be up and running in a day or two if your images are already created.

As a bonus it tends to look more professional as well, because you don't have to deal with poor lighting conditions.

Check out these examples:

http://dicehatemegames.com/games/carnival/
http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/gameknightgames/exile-sun-multiplaye...

Dralius
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genericm wrote:I'm not sure

genericm wrote:
I'm not sure how your computer skills fare, but for our kickstarter campaign I learned Flash animation. Its pretty easy to learn! I would say after a few tutorials you could be up and running in a day or two if your images are already created.

As a bonus it tends to look more professional as well, because you don't have to deal with poor lighting conditions.

Check out these examples:

http://dicehatemegames.com/games/carnival/
http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/gameknightgames/exile-sun-multiplayer-conflict-redefined

After numerous hours of filming, reviewing the video, and pulling my hair out I’m going to try making an animation and dub in my voice in.

Maybe I’m being too critical but less than 10% of what I filmed I deemed usable and much of that I’m not totally happy with.

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