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What software do you use?

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Kaptin Blacksquig
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Joined: 04/18/2011

Hey all,

Simple question, what software do you use for prototyping, art, card/board design etc.
I've been playing with lots of the free stuff/stuff I've got on my computer already, but think its time to invest in some decent art and design software, any thoughts?

Cheers
KB

silasmolino
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Joined: 02/01/2013
You can never go wrong

You can never go wrong with Illustrator, Photoshop, or Indesign. If you are a student, you can get these at a discount in America. Just go to your campus book store.
I'm using CS4.

HandwrittenAnthony
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Joined: 12/01/2011
Illustrator+Photoshop

I'm not graphic design expert, so Photoshop and Illustrator are way more than sufficient for everything I need while prototyping.

I did try Inkscape for a little while, but it didn't play nice with the iMac. Plus I really didn't like the way it used groups instead of layers (but I think I might secretly be a layers pedant).

larienna
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Joined: 07/28/2008
Personally, I prefer to stay

Personally, I prefer to stay free especially since I now primarily use linux. For making playtest prototypes, Inkscape is the most important software I use.

To make the final products, I use Inkscape, GIMP and Scribus for the rules.

Other software I intend to use eventually:

MyPaint
Magic Set Editor (used as a generic card editor)

Dralius
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Joined: 07/26/2008
Although I have Photoshop,

Although I have Photoshop, Gimp and other programs I could use I don’t find the need often and use MS Word and Paint are adiquite for most things.

Martin-r-m
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Joined: 07/26/2012
Corel Draw

I am using Corel Draw. There are some discounters that sell the bundle X6 for 99 €.

Squinshee
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Joined: 10/17/2012
I use Google Drive for all my

I use Google Drive for all my design docs. The drawing software is simple and filled with a bunch of helpful preset icons that I use. You can then import any image you create from the drawing doc into a written document. And you can even edit that image in the written document! It's simple, fast, and pretty awesome. I recommend Google Drive for PROTOTYPING, not final art.

Martin-r-m
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Joined: 07/26/2012
clipart

What is more important than the software is the clipart. I am using 3 different collections and this reduces prototyping very much. Scaling cliparts and being able to modify them on vector basis makes it easier for me.

Kaptin Blacksquig
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Joined: 04/18/2011
Thanks!

Cheers guys, some really good advice.

Martin-r-m you mentioned clip art collections, any advice on good (preferable cheap) sources?

larienna
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Joined: 07/28/2008
Dingbat fonts are a very good

Dingbat fonts are a very good source of black and white clip art.

Martin-r-m
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Joined: 07/26/2012
Clipart

I am using Big Box of Art with 615.000 images and clipart.

http://www.amazon.de/Big-Box-Art-615-images/dp/B0000664K0/ref=sr_1_4?s=s...

richdurham
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Joined: 12/26/2009
Clipart sources

I've stayed away from boxed collections of art (except for prototypes) for any games that are going to the public (like print and play titles on up) since many of those collections don't give commercial rights.

What I do like to use are public domain or creative commons licensed art from places like:

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