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triviageek
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I just heard about this forum on the Breaking into Board Games Podcast, and immediately rushed to check it out. I have to say, this site is exactly what I was looking for in terms of design ideas, networking and general info.

I currently have three (very different) designs in the basic prototype/early play testing stage and was stuck as where to go next. I suspect this forum will help greatly!

Glad to make your acquaintance!

-Triviageek

Squinshee
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Glad to have ya!

Glad to have ya!

A Round Tuit
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Welcome!

Welcome!
It will.
What are your three designs? Elevator pitch version. Go! :D

The Professor
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Welcome!

TriviaGeek,

The more the merrier...glad you found us.

Cheers,
Joe

triviageek
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Pitch 1

Trial By Jury. A card game played in three rounds. Round 1 is a card draft to gather evidence, seat jurors and screen witnesses. Round 2 is the trial where witness and evidence cards are played to influence the jurors. This is all accomplished by taking turns drawing up and playing cards until all evidence and witnesses have been presented. Finally step 3 is the jury deliberation. By rolling either sets of dice (different combinations of two d4, d6, or d8) the jury either acquits or convicts based on the defense winning 6 or more of the jurors.
Two acquittal thresholds must be met, the evidence cards mitigate which die is used and the witnesses raise or lower the acquittal threshold.

triviageek
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Pitch 2

Pavlichenko

This is a one vs. everybody hidden movement game in which one player is a sniper trying to take care of the opposing force of soldiers before they can figure out where the sniper is and capture her (Pavlichenko was a legendary female sniper from WW2).
The action takes place on a customizable hex board and the sniper may do one of three actions each turn; move, shoot or reload. The sniper also has one time use cards to help her out in her quest. For their own part, the soldiers can move or search the area on each turn. When a soldier searches, they draw a card which is rarely helpful, sometimes hurtful, and often times neither. Three cards can be turned in to create a bunker behind which a soldier is safe from sniper fire.
If the Sniper kills all of the soldiers, she wins. If the soldiers find (land on) the Sniper, they win.

The Professor
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Intriguing!

TriviaGeek,

I'm truly intrigued by both games for very different reasons. As a member of the law enforcement community, a game in which guilt or innocence is determined by dice is a fascinating mechanic.

For Pavlichenko, I'm a Russian Foreign Area Officer in the Air Force and have a Master's Degree in Internatonal Relations focused on Russia and the Baltic States. I studied WWII extensively and have heard of, though know little about, this sniper.

Cheers,
Joe

triviageek
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Pitch 3

(As of now, unnamed and unthemed, but playable)

I need to work on this pitch, as I am not sure I can do it without the main component visible.

Set collection and engine building. A six segmented, rotating wheel with six different colors is the main component. To begin the game, 18 colored cubes (randomized from a bag) are placed on the wheel on their individual colored segments. Each player is assigned one of the segments as their home segment.

On a player's turn they may perform one of the following actions
-take ALL of the cubes from their own home segment
-take two cubes from two different segments
-purchase a point card (marked with the cube colors and amounts required to purchase) All worth 1,2,3 or 4 points
-Purchase a 2:1 trade card
-trade 2:1 with any 2:1 card that they own (cards allow trade of 2 of a specific color for any cube on the wheel)

At the beginning of the 2nd and all subsequent turns, the wheel is reseeded with 6 random cubes and the players blind bid for the right to be the first player (This bid is paid with cubes from their own stock)

Play continues until one player reaches 15 points

triviageek
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The Professor

The Professor wrote:
TriviaGeek,

I'm truly intrigued by both games for very different reasons. As a member of the law enforcement community, a game in which guilt or innocence is determined by dice is a fascinating mechanic.

For Pavlichenko, I'm a Russian Foreign Area Officer in the Air Force and have a Master's Degree in Internatonal Relations focused on Russia and the Baltic States. I studied WWII extensively and have heard of, though know little about, this sniper.

Cheers,
Joe

I went to great lengths to be sure that the meat of this game was in the manipulation of the dice. A base acquittal value of 7 is the starting point for all jurors. There are two separate thresholds of 7 to be met, one with a black die and one with a red die. Each individual juror has a prejudice base number (black) and a persuasion base number (red). At the base level, a black d6 and a red d6 would be rolled and added to each base number. If BOTH surpass the acquittal threshold (7 at the base level) the juror acquits.
The evidence cards and witness cards either mitigate the die (changing a d6 to a d8 or d4) or the acquittal base number for either the black or red values. By lowering the d6 to a d4, and raising the acquittal threshold, the prosecution pulls ahead on the juror. Conversely, by lowering the acquittal threshold and changing the d6 to a d8, the defense pulls ahead.
The entirety of the 2nd phase is this process played out on all 12 jurors. The players need to make judgements on which jurors are worth fighting over and which ones are either safe or out of touch.

The Professor
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Expertise?

Just curious, did you consult courtroom attorneys, judges, magistrates or anyone with some subject matter expertise? You have an interesting idea, and I'm interested to know the depth of your research. Again mitigating the evidence is exactly what a defense attorney would do, while the prosecution is doing everything in their power to make the strongest case.

ElKobold
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As for the sniper
ElKobold
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About the court game though,

About the court game though, what kinds of decisions do the players make? I.e why play this card and not the other? From what i've read so far, it's a game about being good at basic statistics ( not very engaging, to be honest) and rolling dice to see who was better at it.

triviageek
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The Professor wrote:Just

The Professor wrote:
Just curious, did you consult courtroom attorneys, judges, magistrates or anyone with some subject matter expertise? You have an interesting idea, and I'm interested to know the depth of your research. Again mitigating the evidence is exactly what a defense attorney would do, while the prosecution is doing everything in their power to make the strongest case.

As far as research goes, not much extra, outside of my own personal knowledge. My father is a fairly successful defense attorney and I picked up a lot from him. I was about three breaths away from taking the LSAT myself (that was a lifetime ago).

triviageek
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ElKobold wrote:About the

ElKobold wrote:
About the court game though, what kinds of decisions do the players make? I.e why play this card and not the other? From what i've read so far, it's a game about being good at basic statistics ( not very engaging, to be honest) and rolling dice to see who was better at it.

That is a fair point. The engagement comes from doing battle over selected jury members, but also in the first round where the draft happens. All of the evidence, witnesses and jury cards come out at once, and you have to make decisions about what to keep OR throw away before you pass your hand to your opponent. Seeing a juror that would be great for you, but also one that would be even better for your opponent, come out at the same time makes for a tough decision. Add to that that you may get an AWESOME piece of evidence, or a great witness, but you also get a juror that just can't be sat. It is all about making the right decision with the cards that you are presented with.

Yes. Statistics are important once you get to discovery, but getting there is another part of the game as well.

Thank you for your input. I am constantly struggling to keep my feelings out of the process and listen to the people who have played the game. Having a blind allegiance to my own work will make for an unsuccessful game in the long run.

ElKobold
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Ok, so it's a drafting

Ok, so it's a drafting game.

No doubt there are interesting decisions during the draft itself.

But I`m not sure if I`m picturing the later part of the game right.

Players play the cards they've drafted earlier and roll dice? Do you need that separation? Isn't just the draft itself enough?

I sort of picture myself a variation of 7 wonders, except the scoring is random :)

triviageek
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ElKobold wrote:Ok, so it's a

ElKobold wrote:
Ok, so it's a drafting game.

No doubt there are interesting decisions during the draft itself.

But I`m not sure if I`m picturing the later part of the game right.

Players play the cards they've drafted earlier and roll dice? Do you need that separation? Isn't just the draft itself enough?

I sort of picture myself a variation of 7 wonders, except the scoring is random :)

The draft is what decides which cards are in play. When you select a card, you can add it to your deck OR discard it from play. This draft continues until twelve jurors have been selected. Once the jury is in place, witness and evidence cards, the ones that mitigate the dice rolls for each individual juror, are played. This is done in a draw and play manner. This promotes a back and forth "tug o' war" if you will. Players need to decide whether they will challenge a particular juror or let it go an focus on others.
Maybe I neglected to mention that the witness and juror cards are played on individual jurors. Thus, there could be a juror that is VERY beneficial to the defense at the beginning, but has become more "in play" as the discovery process goes on. The end result is that there will be some jurors who are mere formalities during the dice roll, and others that really could go either way.

I guess, in essence, this game boils down to a back and forth battle to affect the dice for the deliberation.
I hope that clears it up a little. I will post pictures of the cards so you can see how the numbers work. That is, if I can figure out how to post a picture here...

triviageek
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pics

Pictures posted in prototype art section

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