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What brought you to game design, motivation?

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fjohnz
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Joined: 10/17/2018

I'm not sure I can articulate this well. The motivation for you? Was it the popularity of the computer: open to almost anything? Was it the cents [USD] or sense: the mind find, brain twists and turners?

Certainly the mental challenge enters into it! But why-- for you?

My interest is in Society and reaching goals. Two players, tight rules, and "The perfect game ending," or game play. The elusive "Never a draw."

Then, there is the marriage between game and fame with its compensation[s]. Is that the main drive?

I like the growing mind and not so much the entertained
endeavor. Luck and pluck. . . like the duck who reaches the opposite end of the pond, one web after the other.

Fertessa
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Joined: 07/18/2018
If I'm understanding you

If I'm understanding you correctly, my motivation was needing a creative outlet. It's also my desire to recreate the entertainment and fun I experienced from certain games in my childhood. I don't care for puzzles or levels of difficulty. I chase the amusement and friendly banter.

Jay103
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Joined: 01/23/2018
"the popularity of the

"the popularity of the computer"?

I like the challenge of design. Not just the game, but figuring out what components would be needed and how much they would cost and how to make them all fit in a box that would fit on a shelf and the whole thing.

wob
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Joined: 06/09/2017
i started designing because

i started designing because the games i wanted were too expensive or not quite what i wanted. so cleverly i spent a lot more money, time and effort making my own.

Tim Edwards
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wob wrote:i started designing

wob wrote:
i started designing because the games i wanted were too expensive or not quite what i wanted. so cleverly i spent a lot more money, time and effort making my own.

I'm with you on this one, wob. My motivation is to get to play the game I want. I'd much rather someone else went to the trouble of making it - especially since I'm struggling so much on my current project. Some people worry about having ideas stolen. I would pay someone to "steal" mine!

wob
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Joined: 06/09/2017
hi. well i do like the

hi.
well i do like the designing side of things. i dont really care about getting published, i either make my games for the piecepack (a public domain game system that anyone can make games for) for PnP (there are a few sites for that) or i make a nice final prototype for the family to play at gatherings (like christmas).
my original post was more that started to design because "why spend £20 and wait 6-8 weeks delivery when you can spend £50 on prototypes and a year designing"
i dont know if that makes me a creative person or a shortsighted, impatient idiot.

after my post i got thinking and realised i actually started by designing "house rules" (monopoly is built for this. i bet we could have a whole other forum on peoples monopoly rules) or "extras" (new community chests, new fluxx cards, new heroes for legendary) i have a feeling most of us started that way.

Jay103
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wob wrote:after my post i got

wob wrote:
after my post i got thinking and realised i actually started by designing "house rules" (monopoly is built for this. i bet we could have a whole other forum on peoples monopoly rules)

Or.. start from a GOOD game and see where THAT goes :)

wob
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Joined: 06/09/2017
i really liked monopoly, but

i really liked monopoly, but like i said we rarely played by the rules (has anyone ever actually read them? i think they are just passed down from generation to generation like folk tales).
we used to play it more like diplomacy than monopoly ( "you dont have to pay me rent this turn, but i want free travel on your railways" or "i will give you half my rent from the blue properties if you move your hotel onto it")
any game that has lasted 100 years and still sells thousands every year must have gotten some of it right.

Tim Edwards
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Joined: 07/30/2015
We someone managed to

We someone managed to revolutionise the game "Coppit" as kids. Much more dynamic after we got our sticky minds all over it, I reckon.

Don't get me wrong, I find the design process really exciting. It's just that the INITIAL motivation for me is not really 'I want to make a game about XYZ'; it's more 'I want to PLAY a game about XYZ, and a good one doesn't exist yet'.

Thanks for the tip about Piecepack. I hadn't heard of that. Although my projects are for personal use, it would be exciting to make them available. Maybe that's a good way of sharing. :)

questccg
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What is "piecepack"???

wob wrote:
...well i do like the designing side of things. i dont really care about getting published, i either make my games for the piecepack (a public domain game system that anyone can make games for) for PnP (there are a few sites for that) or i make a nice final prototype for the family to play at gatherings (like christmas)...

I had to take a look at "piecepack". I'm not 100% sure I understood... Maybe since you have more "familiarity" with it, you could answer some of my question.

1. Is "piecepack" like a SET of components? Much like game "restrictions" in certain game design contest like you need a "Board" and "meeples" but no "dice", etc.

2. If "no" ... then I misunderstood and don't comprehend the platform. Can you offer some additional insights?

Thanks for addressing these questions. Cheers!

ZerusDabliu
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Joined: 10/22/2018
There are 2 main reasons for

There are 2 main reasons for me. Firstly game worlds and how interesting their concept can be, I've experienced this mostly with online RPGs, not really into the story of the game. Spent a good time admiring the different habitats, landscapes, cities and how these affected or were made by different creatures and races existing in that world.
Secondly was the player actions. How the rules allowed players to take different actions to solve their problem or achieve a goal, it's all about letting players finding their preference on how to tackle a situation. Games that offered this kind of customization and versatility of play really inspired me.

wob
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Joined: 06/09/2017
questccg (sorry to anyone not

questccg (sorry to anyone not interested this is a bit off topic) the piecepack is a game system. it was designed to be the boardgame equivalent to a pack of cards. it is made of tiles (24 marked 0-5 in 4suits with a grid on the back), 24 coins (0-5 in suits) with matching pawns and dice. (there are standard specs on line)
there are a few versions (different suits). it is all public domain/free from copyright etc so anyone can make and sell the sets. there are a few places that sell them or you can make your own- the graphics are all free online (making a set is a nice activity to do with the kids)
the games are all free as well at ludism.org piecepack wiki (google it to be sure). you can make a game for it to share (or keep to yourself). any games you share will be available for anyone to play free but you do retain the rights to it (like a free print and play).
there are no restrictions as such. you can add other components (extra dice, cards etc) just make them easily available and generic
i like it as a first step for prototyping. the pieces are flexible (coins can be pawns, victory points, a progress track etc) and it makes it easy for play testers (print and play without the print).
the games you make will be abstract (or you will have to imagine the theme) but that could be a good thing if you want to make a "real" game later.
i really recommend the system as a starting point for designers. a few people have made "ports" of popular games like settlers.( i dont know how the license holders feel about that but i dont think they mind (i havent heard of any court case)) and this can be a good training exercise in game design (even if it never leaves your play group).

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