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Scaling of Battles - Global Warming

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bottercot
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Hello,
So some of you may have seen my earlier post about risk-scale battles being resolved at a smaller scale. Well since then, I have made some changes that I think will really lead to as realistic and immersive a combat experience as possible.

The main game is played on a map representing territories and armies. Each army has a corresponding tile with smaller "battalions" in it.

When war is declared into a territory, the struggle for control is represented by joining two more detailed, smaller scaled tiles representing the two territories. On here, invading battalions will be placed at the borders.

When a battalion enter a space with an enemy battalion, it triggers a conflict. A new map is pulled out, representing the district where the battle is taking place. This includes towns, cities, and basic groupings of terrain types.

Each battalion has a corresponding tile with smaller "platoons" in it. These are what are represented on the board.

When a platoon enters a space with an enemy platoon, it triggers a conflict. A new map is pulled out, representing the battlefield where the battle is taking place. This includes terrain, rivers, towns, and environments.

Each platoon has a corresponding tile with smaller "units" in it. these are what are represented on the board.

When a unit enters a space with an enemy unit, it triggers a conflict. A new map is pulled out, representing the area where the battle is taking place. This includes rivers, streams, the condition of the ground, and clusters of trees.

Each unit has a corresponding tile with smaller "companies" in it. These are what are represented on the board.

When a company enters a space with an enemy company, it triggers a conflict. A new map is pulled out, representing the small area where the battle is taking place. This includes small streams, major fords, the state of the ground, and individual trees.

Each company has a corresponding tile with smaller "squads" in it. These are what are represented on the board.

When a squad enters a space with an enemy squad, it triggers a conflict. A new map is pulled out, representing the site of the conflict. This includes the placement of large rocks, the length of the grass, trees depicted at a large scale, and the wetness, traction and buoyancy of the ground.

Each squad has a corresponding tile with smaller "soldiers" in it. These are what are represented on the board.

When a soldier enters a space with an enemy soldier, it triggers a conflict. A new map is pulled out, representing the site of the conflict. This includes the individual placement of clumps of grass, rocks, and puddles of water, as well as the hardness of the ground, all present trees and the radius of their branches, including the type of leaves on the tree, the denseness of the branches, and the way that the individual branches of the tree have grown, accounting for clumping, odd gaps, and how the wind is making the branches wave.

The combat system finally comes into play here. It accounts for such things as weapons, weapon types, weapon designs, weapon sharpness, weapon material, how the journey has effected the weapon, handle design and the wood from which it was created, weapon durability, individual details in weapons such as deformities and abnormalities, and of course all the properties of the weapon that affect how it is wielded, such as weight, weight balance, the best stance for using it, all of it's edges, blades and points, etc. The combat system also accounts for the individual soldier's preferred combat stance and style, his build and muscle placement, his stature and training, his diet, hydration, mental state, IQ, and hygiene, and how he is feeling at the particular moment.

All of this is taken into account for both parties involved in the duel, as well as how the environment affects their performance.

For the actual combat side of this conflict, complex physics equations and procedural predictions are used to determine exactly how the soldier will engage, where he will swing, with how much force he will attack, etc., all affected by the aforementioned factors. Calculations are done at a half-second by half-second basis, where each moment is simulated in as realistic a way as possible.

There is an incredibly complex and realistic system for determining blows when they land, including the effects of armor, clothing, skin thickness, sweat and the way it might cause the attacker's weapon to slide, and the motion that the attacked is performing at the time of impact.

Damage is calculated on a blood vessel and muscle tearage basis, accounting for all the aforementioned factors. Diseases that may have entered through the wound are also accounted for, although that is a later calculation included with health concerns.

I could list every single thing that is calculated in my incredibly accurate combat system, but I don't want to go into unnecessary detail, so I'll just cut to the ending of the conflict.

After a conflict is completed, the map is put back away, and it moves to the next larger scale of map. This is executed over and over until the war is over.

There you go, that's half of my game. I'm still working on the political side of the game, and I haven't fully worked out the technology tree yet.
My question is, how can I do environmental change? I really want global warming to have an effect on gameplay, but haven't come up with a realistic way to implement it.

Suggestions are welcome.

questccg
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My opinion

It's too convoluted. Maybe if you have two (2) levels: Macro and Micro... That to me would be enough. I don't understand how people think up things and fail to see how unrealistic their solutions are.

If you had a "World-view" and a "Battle-view" I think this would be enough.

Where the heck are you going to put all the other "map layers" into the play area??? Don't you think players would get annoyed of doing all these layers maybe more than 2 times?? Isn't this going to make your clean-up or housekeeping phase too long and too repetitive?

You should simplify it. IMHO.

let-off studios
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Design Goal?

If your goal is to have the most realistic, fine-grained medieval combat simulator in existence, I'd say you are on the right path.

However, if you want to make an actual game, then you need to justify the need to scale down to such a miniscule level of detail. In other words: in the grand scheme of things, what difference does the death of one soldier in that particular 10m^2 paddock make to the pursuit of the player's goal? Do you need to go to that level of detail to make intelligent, interesting decisions?

Rather than agree with questccg about this being "too convoluted," I think I understand what you're describing here rather clearly (you did an excellent job with that!). But your description doesn't answer the crucial question of, "Why bother?"

So, what is your design goal with this? I don't think I've understood that, through any of your recent discussion threads. This is most likely a failing on my part. Regardless, I wanted to ask it flat-out so I can at least attempt to offer some useful suggestions.

questccg
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3D Platform(??)

let-off studios wrote:
...Rather than agree with questccg about this being "too convoluted," I think I understand what you're describing here rather clearly (you did an excellent job with that!). But your description doesn't answer the crucial question of, "Why bother?"...

I think you and the guy who designed the 3D Terrain solution would get along great. Why do I say this? Well he has LEVELS to his device and your IDEA would greatly benefit from several levels for each of the extra details.

For example: on the bottom-most level you could have a 12" x 12" board which corresponds to you macro view. Then you can have like three (3) levels above it which could act as your map details (the layers you have presented) at least SOME of them and then on the top-most layer you could have another 12" x 12" board with the soldiers and 3D elements like trees, etc.

The 3D Device guy was looking for people to USE his device but didn't know of any games that could be played on it. They were like: "Bring your own miniatures and play a game". Of course this is stupid, adults play with rules and enjoy games. Your idea could be adapted well to their 3D device because you'd have in-between layers (between macro and micro).

Anyhow this is what I mean for them to have a contest and have Game Designer DESIGN games for the 3D device. They failed to understand the logic and why we were suggesting that.

But your game idea could profit from the extra levels...

bottercot
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It wasn't a serious

It wasn't a serious suggestion...

let-off studios
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Hahaha!

Well, color me surprised. :)

X3M
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Wow, youth sentiments.

Serious or not. I played a similar game in the past (no politics, just war)

When entering a new territory, the macro map had entrance points. N/E/S/W. Some could have a choice too, depending on where we entered.
Retreating was the same mechanic, but reversed. You could enter a territory from the north, then retreat to the east.
To hold a territory, the centre played a role as well.

Everything was squared back then.

Snorka’s Board Games
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This is amazing.

It really is. I would play this, like, once, then decide it was entirely too complicated. Let us know when you find any playtesters. (Quick question: how many players? I think it would be really great as a solo game where the AI thinks about every possible outcome and every soldier’s individual statistics.)

bottercot
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I made up 90% of this

I made up 90% of this suggestion as I typed, by the way. There's no way on earth I could figure out how to work a game like this.

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