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Playtesting Coinage

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OrlandoPat
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Joined: 10/16/2008

I was just answering a post in another thread, and it brought to mind a quirky situation that you guys might get a kick out of.

We've been playtesting a game over the past several months that uses a fair number of money counters. By "fair number", I mean that each player typically has up to two hundred "gold".

I searched and searched for an easy way to represent the gold. I'm not a big fan of the little cardboard counters (ala Illuminati) for testing. They're a pain to make and don't hold up very well. I looked at chips, but the cost of poker chips was prohibitive, and I really didn't want to make stickers and stick them on.

So...I ended up using real coins. I went to the bank and got a couple rolls of pennies, nickels, dimes and quarters. It works like a charm! The coins hold up to rugged handling, there's no learning curve as to what the money represents, and playtesters are particularly careful not to lose them.

It also gives the table an exciting feel to it, as onlookers see piles of coins scattered here and there.

Verseboy
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Joined: 12/31/1969
Playtesting Coinage

I've done the same thing before. And I've used pennies as scoring chips. Nothing like getting your game supplies from Uncle Sam.

Steve Bennett

Discord
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Joined: 12/31/1969
Playtesting Coinage

I wonder if there's ever been a retail game that required you to provide your own coins/chips/tokens in this manner. :)

"Each player requires $20 worth of nickels to play. Sorry if this is a hassle, but this way the boardgame you just bought was substantially cheaper than it would have been, and when you're done playing, you can go spend your playing pieces on icecream."

Gogolski
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Joined: 07/28/2008
Playtesting Coinage

I work in a hospital, so I use flip-caps for playtesting purposes...

Cheese!

OrlandoPat
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Joined: 10/16/2008
Exactly!

Gogolski, those flip-caps are a great idea - but from your Google link, it looks like they cost more than a penny a piece. It's cheaper to use real pennies!

Ska_baron
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Joined: 08/02/2008
Playtesting Coinage

Somewhat related:

I just read somewhere that it now costs more than one cent to make a US penny.

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/04/22/business/22charts.html?ex=1303358400&e...

Crazy!

Also, I speak only as a gamer on this topic: my opinion is that metal money would be cool and definitely set your game apart. =)

Gogolski
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Playtesting Coinage

[quote"OrlandoPat"]Gogolski, those flip-caps are a great idea - but from your Google link, it looks like they cost more than a penny a piece. It's cheaper to use real pennies!As I said, I work in a hospital where flipcaps (medicine vial caps) of all sizes and colors are thrown away every day. Good for me...

Cheese!

doho123
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Joined: 07/21/2008
Playtesting Coinage

Discord wrote:
I wonder if there's ever been a retail game that required you to provide your own coins/chips/tokens in this manner. :)

"Each player requires $20 worth of nickels to play. Sorry if this is a hassle, but this way the boardgame you just bought was substantially cheaper than it would have been, and when you're done playing, you can go spend your playing pieces on icecream."

Actually, this is fairly common.

There are numerous garage-shop companies that do this for every part except for game specific things (like cards). The most well-known, and I think, the first, is Cheapass Games. The other names of companies escape me right now.

Normally, the game specific parts come in a small envelope with just black printing on colored card stock.

Additionally, many CCGs require you to go get your own life coounters. I think the Munchkin games pretty much tell you to go use pennies for your life counters, and at least the early on, Magic and Jyhad didn't come with life counters eithers (don't know if starter decks these days supply that or not).

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