Skip to Content

Producing a prototype

6 replies [Last post]
sedjtroll
sedjtroll's picture
Offline
Joined: 07/21/2008

I

Anonymous
Producing a prototype

Cards can be tricky. I would definatly lay out your artwork in a template. I make cards on an 11 X 17 sheet of C2S cards stock, and manually feed it through the back of the printer. I would use plain paper first until you have all the front to back registration dialed in. Always use the rear manual feed. Otherwise, the slip of the the paper when the printer pulls the page through will make maintaining registartion a nightmare.

Ink jet on C2S can also be trouble because the ink will smear, so, I print one side, let it dry for about an hour, then print the back side. After this, you

sedjtroll
sedjtroll's picture
Offline
Joined: 07/21/2008
Producing a prototype

Just at the moment we have about 100 of 1 type of card, 25 of another, and 18 of another. These numbers will necessarily get bigger, this is like a scaled down sample version so we could test it.

- Seth

FastLearner
Offline
Joined: 12/31/1969
Producing a prototype

There are a couple of threads here on cards. I use plain cardstock in CCG sleeves for the very early prototypes, then I print both sides of the cardstock (on my color laser) and Xyron (cold laminate) them -- they shuffle very well and are almost like real cards (though there are minor problems, including them sticking together during the first game).

Wil_Upchurch
Offline
Joined: 12/31/1969
Producing a prototype

Since I just finished up a prototype today this topic is near and dear to my heart.

As an aside, I don't even think you need to use cardstock for a card game prototype. Printing cards on paper and putting them in sleeves is really enough.

For any game you need to build a template and then populate it. I went about things the hard way for this latest prototype, but the results are nice. I created the board in Photoshop then printed it in pieces, cut it, and glued it to a piece of cardboard. The 124 tokens were made by putting together a template in Quark and then importing the pictures for each. Then I glued the tokens (round wood discs from Michaels) to colored poster board and cut them out (next time I will simply use markers to color them), and then printed the illustrations out, cut them into circles (hand cramps!), and glued them to the opposite side...voila! A 4-player game with waaaay too many tokens. :)

Now we'll have to see how it plays. :)

Wil

Scurra
Scurra's picture
Offline
Joined: 09/11/2008
Producing a prototype

Wil_Upchurch wrote:
...voila! A 4-player game with waaaay too many tokens. :)

ROFL. I had the same reaction when you mentioned over a hundred tokens... It's always good when the designer realises that might be a problem as well :)

Anonymous
Producing a prototype

My recent prototype used carboard just cut from a box, and it bent great! I taped the edges with electrical tape, and this gave the board an almost psuedo-professional touch. Also, let's not forget my use of spray-painted pinto beans for counters.

One more thing: I bought a few stamps and made a card deck out of some old business cards I had lying around. They work great! They shuffle fine, and are perfect for fine tuning of cards for testing. In fact, I've really condisdered getting some nice stamps for testing and creation. Maybe even as a way to produce sellable protos.

Syndicate content


forum | by Dr. Radut